Sony and Samsung Breaking VBR

By: Ethan Ace, Published on Oct 21, 2016

For years, users have known variable bitrate (VBR) as one thing only: bandwidth varies, compression stays the same.

This is not an accident but an essential characteristic of VBR. By allowing the bit rate to vary, the compression level can stay the same regardless of the changes in scene complexity (think hallway when a school is closed vs hallway during recess vs hallway at night).

But now, in a confusing move, some manufacturers have changed their definition of VBR, giving users no option to adjust image quality. We take a look at these issues in this note.

*** *****, ***** **** known******** ******* (***)** *** ***** ****: bandwidth ******, *********** ***** the ****.

**** ** *** ** accident *** ** ********* characteristic ** ***. ** allowing *** *** **** to ****, *** *********** level *** **** *** same ********** ** *** changes ** ***** ********** (think ******* **** * school ** ****** ** hallway ****** ****** ** hallway ** *****).

*** ***, ** * confusing ****, **** ************* have ******* ***** ********** of ***, ****** ***** no ****** ** ****** image *******. ** **** a **** ** ***** issues ** **** ****.

[***************]

Samsung/Hanwha ******* *

*** ******* * ****** (*** *** ****) **** *** ******* a **** *** ************** which ***** *********** ** a ******** ************. ** compression ******* ** ******** in *** *** *********, shown *****, ***** **** Samsung ****** ******** **-** ***** ** *********** levels. ******* **** ******, users **** ****** ** trial *** *****, ********* the ******* *** ** find *** **** ******** of ***** ******* *** bandwidth *** ***** *****.

Sony *** **********

** ****'* *** ********** 4K/20MP ******, *** ***-****** (*** *** ****), *** ***** ******** no ***********/******* ******* ** was ***** ** **** cameras, **** * ***** "Bit **** *" (*********** a ****** *******) *** "Max" (*** ***). 

*******, **** ***** ******** are *********, ** ** found *** ****** ******** less ********* **** *** target ******* ** *** tests, *** ***** ********** the ******* ***, ********** of ***** ********. ** review ***** ****** ** this ***** **** *** tests, *****. 

Why **** ******* 

******* ******* ** ***********, users *** (**********) ****** that ***** ******* *** using ********** *********** ****** (27-30 *******), *** ******* bandwidth. *******, ***** ******* settings ** **** ** the ***** ************* ******* in **** *** ************ (low ***), ***** ******** little ******* ******* ** image *******, *** ********* bandwidth *************.

******* ***** ***** ** these ****** *** ***** workarounds, ***** ***** *********** be ******* *********/******* ***** and ******** ********* ****.

May ** ******

**** **** **** ** highlight *** ************* ***** as *** ******** ** are ***** ** *** our *******. *******, ** you **** ***** ******** of ************* ***** ***** or ***** ***-******** ***** configurations, ******* *****.

Further *******

************* ****** ***/*** (******* bitrate) ************** ** *** to **** ******* ************ video. ******* ****** **** see ***** ******* *** more *********** ** ***** streaming *******, *** ******* of ********* ****, *** compression:

Comments (4)

Dear Ethan,

I am confused with the terminology MBR used by you, what it means as per standard ?

As such there is

CBR - Constant Bit Rate( Encoder must meet user set target bitrate )

VBR - Variable Bit Rate ( There is no cap on Maximum bitrate to be achieved by encoder, video image quality is the encoder's priority irrespective of result bitrate)

CVBR - Constrained VBR ( Extended VBR standard where there is cap on Maximum Bit Rate, to achieve quality under complex scene encoder can not exceed the Maximum Bit Rate cap).

Do you mean the term MBR is CVBR as per standard ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_bitrate

Do you mean the term MBR is CVBR as per standard ?

CVBR is not a 'standard'. It is just another name for VBR with a cap.

We avoid using CVBR since, within our industry, some vendors use CVBR to mean something different. For example, Pelco's CVBR implementation historically has been VBR within a tightly constrained bandwidth range.

As such, we use MBR to emphasize the 'maximum' element.

Thanks for the clarification John.

So MBR is the name used by IPVM or some vendors.

Googled about MBR but except IPVM site I couldn't get any such useful information and was curious to know what it is.

Axis is using MBR:

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

Bandwidth Fundamentals For Video Surveillance on Jan 13, 2020
Bandwidth is the most fundamental element of computer networking for video surveillance systems. Because video surveillance can consume an immense...
Testing Bandwidth vs. Frame Rate on Jan 23, 2019
Selecting frame rate has a major impact on surveillance bandwidth and storage consumption. But with smart codecs now common and cameras more...
Bandwidth vs Low Light Shootout - Avigilon, Axis, Bosch, Dahua, Geovision, Hanwha, Hikvision, Uniview, Vivotek on Feb 08, 2019
Nighttime bandwidth spikes are a major concern in video surveillance, but do all manufacturers' cameras perform the same? Are some more consistent...
H.265 Usage Statistics on Apr 19, 2019
H.265 has been available in IP cameras for more than 5 years and, in the past few years, the number of manufacturers supporting this codec has...
Average Frame Rate Video Surveillance 2019 on May 23, 2019
What is the average frame rated used in video surveillance systems? In IPVM's 2011 statistics, the average was 6-8fps increasing to ~10fps in...
Verkada Video Quality Problems Tested on May 23, 2019
Verkada suffers from numerous video quality problems, not found in commercial IP cameras, new IPVM testing of Verkada vs Axis and Hikvision...
Smart CODEC Usage Statistics 2019 on Jun 03, 2019
Smart codecs are now nearly a standard feature in IP cameras, but our statistics show integrator adoption has not increased at the same rate. In...
False Verkada 'Unrivaled' Low Light Performance Claim Removed on Jun 12, 2019
Verkada falsely claimed that it delivered 'UNRIVALED LOW LIGHT PERFORMANCE' until IPVM questioned. In fact, Verkada's low light performance is...
Axis Live Privacy Shield Analytics Tested on Jun 25, 2019
Privacy is becoming a bigger factor in video surveillance, driven both by increased public awareness and by GDPR. Now, Axis has released Live...
IPVM Opens 12,000 Sqft Testing Facility on Dec 16, 2019
IPVM is proud to announce the opening of the world's first video surveillance testing facility that will allow us to significantly expand our...

Most Recent Industry Reports

Hazardous & Explosion Proof Access Control Tutorial on Feb 27, 2020
Controlling access to hazardous environments requires equipment meeting specific ratings that certify they will not start fires or will not...
Motorola / Avigilon Drops ISC West on Feb 26, 2020
Motorola Solutions has pulled out of ISC West 2020 effective immediately, because of coronavirus concerns, IPVM has learned. This is done amidst...
Cancel or Not? Industry Split Over ISC West on Feb 26, 2020
The industry is split, polarized, over whether ISC West 2020 should run or be canceled. New IPVM survey results of 400+ respondents show heated...
Coronavirus Hits Sony, Bosch Says Switch on Feb 26, 2020
Sony's fall in video surveillance has been severe over the past decade. Now, they may be done. In this note, we examine Bosch's new...
Video Surveillance Cameras 101 on Feb 25, 2020
Cameras come in many shapes, sizes and specifications. This 101 examines the basics of cameras and features used in 2020. In this report, we...
Favorite Video Analytic Manufacturers 2020 on Feb 25, 2020
Video analytics is now as hot as ever, driven by the excitement of advancing deep learning offers. But what are actually integrator's...
Latest London Police Facial Recognition Suffers Serious Issues on Feb 24, 2020
On February 20, IPVM visited another live face rec deployment by London police, but this time the system was thwarted by technical problems and...
Masks Cause Major Facial Recognition Problems on Feb 24, 2020
Coronavirus is spurring an increase in the use of medical masks, which new IPVM test results show cause major problems for facial recognition...
Every VMS Will Become a VSaaS on Feb 21, 2020
VMS is ending. Soon every VMS will be a VSaaS. Competitive dynamics will be redrawn. What does this mean? VMS Historically...
Video Surveillance 101 Course - Last Chance on Feb 20, 2020
This is the last chance to join IPVM's first Video Surveillance 101 course, designed to help those new to the industry to quickly understand the...