Trend: 4K Monitors for Surveillance

Author: John Honovich, Published on Jan 10, 2014

4K is one of the next growth areas for IP cameras. Indeed, with major new announcements at CES 2014, it may more quickly impact surveillance monitor selection first.

Historically, some objected to multi megapixel cameras because of monitor resolution constraints. Though digital zoom, especially for investigations, still made it useful, clearly being able to display multiple cameras at native resolution live and without zooming holds benefits, including the potential to make it easier for guards to spot problems (and lose focus less quickly).

** *** **** ****, ** ********, ***** ********, **** ********* of *******, *** **** ****** *** ******** ****** **************** ******* ****** **** ********** ********.

***, **** *** ************, *****, ******** *** **** ** ********** *** ****** ************ ***** **$***, **** ***** ** *** *************. ******* *********, ** *** 2014,****, **** *** ****** *** *********** ******** *** **** **** $*,***. ****,***** ********** ** **** ** ******* **** **** ** **** **** than *** ******* $*** ***.

** *** ****** ****, ** *** * ********** ** **** ** *** ******* ********** ************ ******* *** ****? *** *** ******* **** **** ***** ******* ****** *************** **** ********* *** *****:

*'* ******* ** "** ***** **** **********" ******** *** *** current ********. **** ** ***** **** ********** ********** ************ ********* that ***'* ** *********, *** ** ***** ** *** ***** of *** *******. * *** *** ************ ** ****** (******* to ** ******* ***** ******* *****) *** *******, *** *** use ***** *** **** ********.

Use **** ***

*** *** ******* * ******** ******* **** **** ** ***** down ** ***** *** ******* ***** ******* **** * * MP ******'* ***** ******** * **** ***** ** **** ** parking *****. *** ***** ******* *** **** ***** ** *** overall *****, *** ** ** ****** ** ** ***** ****** the *********** ***** ***** ***** ******* *** **** ***** ********** when *** ***** ** ** ** *****.

**** ** ****** ********* ** ******** **** ******** ******-***-**** ** pixels-per-anything—they ****** ****** ***** ** * ********* ***** *** *** looking ************* ** *** ****** ******. (**** *: * ******* know *** *** *** * *** ** ***, *** *'* agree **** *** *********** **** *'** ***** **** * ****-***** application **** ** **** ** *** ****, ** *** ********* providing *** **********.) ************* ***** ****** **** *** ****** ******’* location *** *********** *** ** ****-**********, * ********* ****'* *** often *** ****. ** *** **** ** ****** *** ******** **** ****-***** ********* is.

** *** ****, **** ** ***** ** **** *** ****** camera ***** ** * ***** *******, *** ***** *** **% of ****** ****. **** ****-**** ********* ** ********** (******* **** or ********) ****** *** ** ** ** *** **** ** this *** ****, ***** ***** **** *****-**-******* ******* ** *** customer ****.

**** * *** *** ********** ** ***** *** ** **** * **°**** ** *** plate** ***** *** *** ***** ****** ** *** ****** ******** screen *** * ********* ****** ******** ****** *** *****, ******** right ***** *** ******. **’** ******* ** *** ***** **-******, and **’* *** *** ****** ** *** *** ***** ****. When ** ******* *** ***** ** *** ****** ** ** 100% ****** **** *** ******** ** *** *****, ** **** did *** *** ****** ** *** ******* ****. ***** ** shouldn't **** **** * ********, *** ** ***.

**** ***** ** ********** ** ***** ** ************* *** ** recordings—*** ** *** **** * **** ** * ********** ****************. ** *** ******* ** *** *********** ****** *** ***** ***** number ** *** ***** *******, **’* *** ** * **** goose *****.

So ** **** * ******* **** *** ******* *** ****** ****** ***** ** *** ****** ** ***% ****** ****. **** ***** **** ** ** **** ***** *** ***** **********. *** *** ***** ***** *** *** ****** ***********.

Use ***** ***, ***** *** ****

*** ******* ****** **’** ******* ** ***** **** ******* ***** (same ** *** **** *** *****), ******* ****** (**** **** Two), **** ******* *** ****** ****** (*** **** *****). ***** use ***** ******* ******* ***** **** ** ******** ********** ************, and ** * ***** **** (*** **** ****).

*** factory ****** *** **** involves reading labels on packages that move down the production line. This ** *** *****-******** ************** ***, *** *** ***** **** ** watch *** ***** ******** ** ***% ****** ***** **********. ************ ***’* **** *** ******* ********* ********* ******* ******. *** safety **** ** *** ******* ***** ***** **** ******* **** resolution ****** ** ******** ***** ***** *** **** ****** ***** is ***% ****** **** ** *** ******.

*** *** events *** **** we want to read license plates, attendee name badges, and get good facial images (at choke points) as well as get good resolution of overall activity. The name badge situation is similar to the license plate use case. We’ll need to view badges in real time on-screen at 100% actual resolution, at the security monitoring workstations. The video wall must have the same resolution as the monitoring workstations.

*** Security ********** ****** (***) ***** **** ****** ******** ******** *** ********** ************,*** ** ******** * *** ** *** *****. *** ***** wall ******** **** ** **** ** ******** ********* ** **** real-time ********** *** ****** **** ******* **** *********, ******* ********, ******* “****** **” ********, ********** **** *****, **** **** ******** ***** *** ***** data *****. ****** **** ** **** **** ** ******** *****, the ****** **** ** *****. ********** *** ********** ********* *** be ** *** ***—** *** ** ******** ** *** ******* watching *** ***** **** (************* ****) ******* * ***** *********** window, ***** **** ** ** **** **** *** ***** ****. A *** ***** ** **” ** *** ******** ******** * 7680 * **** ******* ******* ** ********** * ****-**** *********, and *****/******** ****** *********, **** *** ******** ***** ****** ** by ******, *** ***** ****** ** ** ******** ********, **** other *********** ********.

Requirements *** *******

*’* ** *** ******* ** requirements *********** right now. The next step is to find appropriate video clips and still images to use for the various use cases, from the customer sites or other sources that accurate represent what we’ll be doing. This includes some example dashboard display images.

***** **** *** ** ** * *********** ******** **** * video **** **** ******** **** ** *** ********, ******** *** ****** ****** ***** ****.

**** ***** *** ******* *******, **** ** *** ***** ***** 4K *** ************?

[******: ******* ** ******* **** *******- *********** / *********** *** ******* / *************.]

Comments (18)

Oh, for those of who are developers or desktop power users, here's a good blog post from a programmer using the Seiki 4K monitor.

I can't wait to get my hands on a 4K monitor for development work. I currently have a GeForce GTX 670 card, which seemed to be the best bang for the buck at the time, and I am now a little anxious to see how well it will handle a 4K display. After all, ONE 4K screen is somewhat similar to driving 4 x 1080P screens, so the GPU is going to be busy. Apparently, the new Mac Pro can drive 3 x 4K displays, but the cost of a Mac Pro is a tad bit higher than your average Dell.

I'd be interested to hear about Ray's real life experience with the 4K system (or anyone else for that matter).

We're using the Seiki 4K 120 Hz monitor as one of three displays on our 3D CAD workstation (the other two displays are a low res ~ 20" monitor for status and other text, and a 1080p monitor for lower resolution concurrent 3D work, typically for subassemblies). There's not much to say about it, except that it's a great price point and the display is crisp and clear. There was nothing remarkable about the setup -- we just plugged it in and the system defaulted to 4k on that display.

Morton, we've also had good luck with GeForce graphics. Since this was a recent build, we're using the GeForce GTX 780 which not surprisingly has the horsepower to manage these displays.

Slightly off topic, during the build we ran across a quirk in which Windows 8.1 consistently crashed very early in the installation process, but two different Linux Live CDs ran with no issues, and using their suites of system testing exposed no issues. You probably know the drill: Google a lot, try this, try that, and see what fixes it. Several hours later, placing the graphics card in PCI-e slot 2 moved us past that challenge. The surprise was, usually it's Linux that delivers some hardware or driver incompatibility that takes a while to run to ground, but this time Linux validated the hardware while Windows 8.1 was stopped dead in its tracks.

John,

Casino applications for 4k monitors wouldn't be that different from any other vertical. In fact, I'm not so certain of any real advantage to 4k monitors other than one large monitor having the ability to replace four smaller monitors for Monitor Walls.

One point is that if the observer is sitting the same distance from the same size screen, there would be very little benefit to 4k over 2k. My reasoning is that the maximum perceivable resolution of a monitor would be the point just before individual pixels can be seen (or jaggedy edges on 2k cameras displayed full screen). By that reasoning, if an observer is far enough away from a monitor that they can't see its individual pixels, any increase in pixel count would not lead to increased perceived sharpness of the images.

Video walls for casino surveillance typically deploy 40"-46" monitors mounted 5' or more away from from observers. At that distance with that screen size, even the sharpest eyes can't see the individual pixels so increasing the pixel count to 4k would provide negligible benefit. That said, if four say, 42" monitors were replaced with one 84" 2k monitor, the individual pixels could become evident at the same distance.

Keeping in mind that one 84" 4k monitor would occupy approximately the same wall area and have the same pixel count as four 42" monitors, replacing the four with the one would yield almost exactly the same pixel count per unit area.

We currently have our monitor wall displaying a mix of 1x1 and 2x2 salvos. We see no need or valid reason to display larger salvos because it would be impossible for an observer to process the information from even 16 (2x2x4) simultaneous panes and, of course, as you increase the number of panes in salvos you lose resolution for each pane.

The only possible application for an 84", 4k monitor that would allow increased detail would be to display an image that is larger than 42" from a single camera and, all else being equal, the camera itself would need to have >2k resolution.

To expand a bit on this, replacing four 42" 2k monitors with one smaller-than-84" 4k monitor on our Monitor Wall would make little sense either. We would either be forced to display less than 16 cameras or resolve to deal with lower resolution per camera than we currently get.

While I have stated and believe that one observer cannot view 16 simultaneous images, the one advantage of displaying that many is that observers would only have to shift their eyes to different areas of the wall to concentrate on the cameras displayed there rather than having to call them up. That's a lot faster. 2x2 salvos per monitor on 2x2 or 3x2 walls allow an observer to focus on one display at a time with no more than four images within their area of concentration. Tracking action on four simultaneous images is considered to be within the capability of a typical operator.

Carl, thanks for the feedback.

I agree: "If an observer is far enough away from a monitor that they can't see its individual pixels, any increase in pixel count would not lead to increased perceived sharpness of the images."

What we have done is bought the Seiki $499 4K 39 inch monitor and a 1080p from them at the same size. We'll do a few scenarios with different distances / positioning of the monitors to see how much it helps make out details, watch surveillance feeds, etc. It won't address your 84 inch monitor scenario but I do think it will help some users get a sense of potential applications.

If you or anyone else have input on this test, let us know.

Hi John,

any specific reason for choosing the NVIDIA Quadro K5000? The AMD FirePro W7000 also supports four 4K monitors and it has similar GPU power as the K5000, but it is basically half the price. I'm just wondering actually, since I don't have any experience with those graphics cards.

Tiago, that was a quote from Ray Bernard.

Ethan recently bought a 4K graphics card. What did you buy, Ethan?

Ops... I overlooked that part.

Btw, checking some reviews on newegg.com, the AMD FirePro W7000 does not seem to be that good.

We bought an ASUS GT630-SL-1GD3-L. It's based on an Nvidia chipset, only dual output, though. It's driving a 40" 4k display currently, which we plan to start formally testing today.

Thanks, Ethan. The 40" 4K monitor is manufactured by Seiki, I assume... based on what I read above?

Looking forward anyway to the results of this test.

It is indeed that monitor. Or TV, really. They also have a 50" available now for $899, and a 60" for cool $2000.

By the way, for those interested, the 4k Wikipedia entry has a been kept up to date with 4k displays (TVs, monitors, and projectors) as they're announced or released.

A performance perspective on 4K monitors.

We recently upgraded our lab to include 4K monitors for some of our products, so naturally , I tried out a couple of VMS clients with them as the target output.

What I discovered is the the CPU use was a 30-50% increase due to the larger 'workspace' that the VMS sees and I was using a higher end video card.

My test was four 2MP cams and I switched the output between a 1080P monitor and a 4K one.

So, keep this in mind when your customers ask for 4K monitor output. Prepare for more CPU horsepower.

Great info, Mike!

I just tried this out with Exacq. Which is not necessarily typical of all VMSes.

Four 1080p streams open in a 2x2 view:

  • Monitor set to 1080p: 23-24% CPU
  • Monitor set to 4k: 27-28% CPU

So clearly there is an increase. I'll be curious to see if it is more or less in other clients. I'll do this on the side of other tests, as we're using other clients. I'll report back if/when I find anything interesting.

So clearly there is an increase.

A 15% increase seems pretty modest considering 4K is rendering 4x as many pixels.

In this case, the 4K quad could be rendered bit-for-bit, where the 1080p version needs to be down-scaled.

On my 4K monitor you can either have the graphics card do the 1080p down scaling or the monitor itself. Whether one way or another affects the CPU more than the other, I'm unsure.

Ethan,

I was using 5MP cams at 10FPS with Milestone. The 2x2 salvo is the same.

The CPU went from 40 to mid 60% simply by changing the monitor.

What might be intereesting on Exacq is the GPU % change since they do use the GPU a little bit.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

Solar-Powered, Smart-Phone-Based Access Kit (VIZPin) Examined on Nov 02, 2018
Cloud-based access control company VIZPin is releasing a solar-powered and smart phone based access control system for gates and other remote...
Directory of Access Control and Intrusion Startups on Oct 30, 2018
This directory catalogs access control and intrusion detection startups IPVM has found noteworthy. The directory is provided for your review to...
ADT Acquires Red Hawk, Becomes Billion Dollar Commercial Business on Oct 25, 2018
With its ~7th commercial acquisition in the past year, ADT is transforming itself from a residential provider to a commercial player with now more...
ADT and Brinks Home Security Struggles Impact On Industry Examined on Oct 23, 2018
ADT and Brinks Home Security have both been struggling over the last year. ADT valuation is 50%+ less than their IPO target. Brinks Home Security,...
Higher Power PoE 802.3bt Ratified, Impact on Security Products Examined on Oct 12, 2018
Power over Ethernet has become one of the most popular features of many video, access, and other security products. See our PoE for IP Video...
Security System Health Monitoring Usage Statistics 2018 on Oct 09, 2018
How well and quickly do integrators know if devices are offline or broken? New IPVM statistics show that typically no health monitoring is...
Fall 2018 New Products Directory on Oct 03, 2018
Fall 2018 New Products Directory We have compiled a directory of new products released fall 2018, or at least since our Spring 2018 Directory. The...
Alexa Guard Expands Amazon's Security Offerings, Boosts ADT's Stock on Sep 21, 2018
Amazon is expanding their security offerings yet again, this time with Alexa Guard that delivers security audio analytics and a virtual "Fake...
Central Stations Face Off Against NFPA On Fire Monitoring on Sep 18, 2018
Central stations are facing off against the NFPA over what they call anti-competitive language in NFPA 72, the standard that covers fire alarms....
European Mega Security Firm Verisure Pushing Security Fog on Sep 17, 2018
The European mega security firm Verisure (Securitas Direct), with a reported 2 million customers, is pushing security fog, as shown in this BBC...

Most Recent Industry Reports

'Sticker' Surveillance Camera Developed (CSEM Witness) on Nov 16, 2018
The Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) has announced what it calls the: world’s first fully autonomous camera that can be...
ISC East 2018 Mini-Show Final Report on Nov 16, 2018
This is our second (updated) and final show report from ISC East. ISC East, by its own admission, is not a national or international show, billed...
Facial Detection Tested on Nov 16, 2018
Facial detection and recognition are increasingly offered by video surveillance manufacturers. Facial detection detects faces in an image/video...
Throughtek P2P/Cloud Solution Profile on Nov 15, 2018
Many IoT manufacturers either do not have the capabilities or the interest to develop their own cloud management software for their devices....
ASIS Offering Custom Research For Manufacturers on Nov 15, 2018
Manufacturers often want to know what industry people think about trends and, in particular, the segments and product they offer.  ASIS and its...
Hikvision Silent on "Bad Architectural Practices" Cybersecurity Report on Nov 14, 2018
A 'significant vulnerability was found in Hikvision cameras' by VDOO, a startup cybersecurity specialist. Hikvision has fixed the specific...
French Government Threatens School with $1.7M Fine For “Excessive Video Surveillance” on Nov 14, 2018
The French government has notified a high-profile Paris coding academy that it risks a fine of up to 1.5 million euros (about $1.7m) if it...
Integrator Credit Card Alternative Divvy on Nov 13, 2018
Most security integrators are small businesses but large enough that they have various employees that need to be able to expense various charges as...
Directory of Video Intercoms on Nov 13, 2018
Video Intercoms, also known as Video Door-Phones or Video Entry Systems, have been growing in the past decade as more and more IP camera...
Beware Amazon Go Store Hype (Tested) on Nov 13, 2018
IPVM's trip to and testing of Amazon Go's San Francisco store shows a number of significant operational and economic issues that undermine the...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact