Sony Exits Branded Video Surveillance Business

By John Honovich, Published Apr 15, 2020, 09:14am EDT (Info+)

After years of decreasing investment into video surveillance, Sony has now exited the branded video surveillance camera business.

However, Sony will continue to provide imaging sensors and camera modules.

In this note, we examine what happened, how it is all ending, what partner Bosch is doing and the future for Sony in video surveillance.

Exit **** ******* ********

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******* *** ***** ****** ****** *** being ***** ** **** ** ******* accessories,***** *********:

Bosch *********** **** ** ****

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Panasonic *******

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Sony ******* ** *** ******?

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** *** ***** ****, *** ****** has ******* **** ******* ******* ***** to *********-******* ****, ** **** **** Sony ** *** ** ****** ** they *** ** *******.

Vote / ****

Comments (22)

Didn't Sony finally just release a bunch of new models including the long awaited multi-sensor? It is strange they would invest all that R&D and then just stop the business.

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The multi-imager (SNC-WL862) was essentially a rebranded Vivotek MA9321-EHTV. Here's the two side by side.

If you look at the WL862 manual, it looks like Vivotek firmware, as well, just in a different color scheme.

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Many Sony cameras were Vivotek OEM. Fish eye for example.

Regards

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Check out Sony's Mobile Phones, this sounds very similar to how they are handling that.

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No more VB-770?

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The best camera from 2016? Sony 35mm Super Low Light Camera Tested

That underscores the problems for Sony. They needed to keep pace and did not.

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Has there been a better low light camera since?

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What about the Canon ME20F???

"Better" is a tough one. The SNC-VB770 might still have an edge in terms of pure low light image quality, but it also had a few problems.

  • Its "VBR" wasn't VBR, so bitrates stayed unnecessarily high when the scene was still, and then didn't increase much when the scene was busy.
  • It had compression artifacts because of that, so you had to set your "cap" (not really a cap) higher than normal or end up dropping quantization inadvertently.
  • The FPS was limited to 10 when multi-streaming (and who doesn't want to multi-stream a 4K camera pushing 8+ Mbps?) or 5 if you turned WDR on. Not the biggest issue considering what it's intended for but others don't have the same limits.

I'd say new generation large imager models like the Axis Q1798-LE, while maybe not quite as bright in low light, are approaching the ballpark but without the same limitations, at 1/4 of the price, and include IR. We haven't tested the two side by side but the Q1798-LE is pretty damn bright, comparable to the best 1080p low light models we've seen.

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Good point on the Q1798-LE as that is a lot cheaper and very close. I have both the Q1798-LE and VB-770 but I haven't done a shoot out.

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All kidding aside though, I think it's a good move for them strategically. There's just so much competition and overhead in selling cameras. Selling components allows them to focus on what they do best. While they were the standard in image quality that only a few could hope to match, they were always late in releasing new products, had limited form factors and troubles with back orders almost on par with Axis.

We'll miss seeing their name, but they definitely haven't gone anywhere.

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You have to change in a timely fashion and keep the loss's minimal or they take down the whole company

Bigger the Giant , the more overhead to watch and more to loose fast

This move will save the rest of the company in the network of companys they own.

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In the industry as we know it today , time is crucial to Profit and making changes and changing with the economic climate is crucial , having the same product over and over will not cut it.

We see this with past Giants who fell due to failure to adapt.

pelco , toshiba , many more

The reason the foreign markets make it and we fail is that we dont give 150% and then after all the overhead and laws, policys force the hand , you cannot make it.

Discipline , Determination , obsession , Life's work all hamper this.

To be the Best , You have to always be in front , going at 150% and never looking back , always looking forward and never breaking for life . Hard way , but success has it s price .

Ask any successful person or company and they will all have the same thing in common

Plans, Visions, goals, discipline , never letting go

Sorry to see you go Sony , you had great product line. and great ideas

The under 100 market , did to you , like they did to many others , went to the bottom to keep sales on top

Change of Venue

Change of direction

Great for opportunity

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This was predictable. Anyone who is surprised or caught off guard by this announcement should probably re-think their line of work :)

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I guess this explains why we were having trouble getting them...

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A sad but quite logical ending. And there is much more to it than the lower margins and the coronavirus. In various periods of the past 15 years I have been working closely with 3 Japanese cctv vendors - JVC, Sanyo and Panasonic. And the thing which was always troubling was the extremely frigid corporate culture of these companies. Yet, around 2010 most of the big Japanese vendors were under attack from the Korean players who were delivering higher specs and attractive design at a better price. And the Japanese companies just refused to adapt, still insisting on doing the business in their way, including outdated sluggish web/software interface, "brick" style product design, "back to the 80s" style of marketing and putting a strong accent on reliability over functionality. The product life cycle of many products was ridiculously long (just take the fact that the Panasonic WJ-NX400 is still a current product in 2020?). They just refused to change and adapt, preferring to close down in the end rather that update the corporate philosophy and be more flexible. The only positive example is probably Canon - not changing anything in the brands they acquired was a good idea...

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do you think this is also the reason why the KR amd TW manufacturers couldn't compete with China ?

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I would say yes, the story repeated itself. The companies from CH were helped further by lower labor costs, huge production base capacity, huge domestic market, so it was even easier for them to overcome the TW vendors in that moment. Also the Chinese business culture is somewhat opposite of the Japanase - they are quite extrovert and flexible, eager to learn and duplicate/mimic what others have succeeded in. And they are really fast to do it..

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Era in buon prodotti professionale.

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Era in buon prodotti professionale.

La troppa bonezza finisce nella monnezza.

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The margins in the CCTV branded product business never came near other pro video sectors where Sony were dominant. I am surprised it has taken them this long to put it out of its misery.

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Sad to see Sony go. I hope they come back in future. If only Bosch can purchase the IP for the SNC-VB770 and re-engineer it to sell at a lower price point, now that would be good!

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