Access Control Does Not Want ONVIF

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Jul 27, 2016

ONVIF has become a major force in video surveillance. Despite its well deserved criticisms, ONVIF is widely embraced by video surveillance manufacturers and generally useful in production deployments.

However, ONVIF has been a resounding dud in Access Control, which has continued to be insular and proprietary. Moreover, that is not changing anytime soon, and the message is clear: Access does not need nor want ONVIF.

We look at the situation deeper in this note.

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*******, ***** *** **** * ********** *** ** ****** *******, which *** ********* ** ** ******* *** ***********. ********, **** is *** ******** ******* ****, *** *** ******* ** *****: Access **** *** **** *** **** *****.

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Single ***** ****** ********* ******

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Major ****** ********* *** "****"

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Interoperability *********** *** *******

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******, ****** ***** ************ ***** *************, **********, *** ***-***** ***** clamored *** ****************, *** **** ******* ****** **** *** ***** in ****** *******.

ONVIF * ** ******

** ***** ** **************** *******, *** **** ** *** **** of ********. ***** *** **** ******* ** **** *** **** video, **** *** * ******* ** ****** ********* ******* * as *** *** *** ********* '**************** ******* ******* *** ******* of ******** ****** ******* ******* (****) *** *******-***** ***** *******'; or ********* ******** *** ****** ******* ******** *********** *** ********** software.

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*** **** ********* ** *** ****** ********, ** ** ***** in ********* ****************: ***** ***********, **** ********* ****** *** ** ****** ********** ** *** conforming ******* *** ** *** *******.

ONVIF * ** ******

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Access ***** ******** ***** ** ***** ********

** *** ******** ** '*** ***'* ***** ********* *** ******?'

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Interoperability's ****** *******: ****

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Big ******: ******* ******* & ********

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Comments (8)

Amen

All that you posted is true. Here one additional item to think about. After we have sold all the hardware and all of the software. We get so sell the other thing, the "blades", i.e., the cards and the codes which is the long term ROI that the providers are working reach.

Besides why on earth would video centric group like ONVIF have in common with the access control market?

I'm with you on this one...

"Many considerOSDP as 'Weigand 2.0', since it adds features like encryption, bidirectional communication, and smart-credential bitrates."

I completely agree on the point that Interoperability has less interest for Access Control. OSDP is where access control meets interoperability. Not only the security, less/easier wiring, but also reduced total cost of the solution. Using Wiegand, you need to have one controller for every 2~4 readers. With OSDP you can have 8~30 slave access readers on each RS485 BUS. That is partially reducing the total cost of the solution ("partially" because in most of cases you still need extension boards with door relay/sensor).

more than 2 readers on an OSDP (or RS-485) wire is apparently rare. A small number of vendors seem to go up to 8 readers.

more than 2 readers on an OSDP (or RS-485) wire is apparently rare. A small number of vendors seem to go up to 8 readers.

That's completely true but I would give "more than 2x OSDP readers" a 25% share of installations. The advantage of OSDP is not only increasing security but also saving cost. I had a third one that is "convenience" because many installers do not wire the feedback from controller to the reader (often called Green/Red LED + Buzzer). So with OSDP you have to think of a 3 sides improvement: "Security/Cost/Convenience"

Our side we see more and more customer using 8x Suprema readers on a daisy chain, with a Master reader controlling the whole (storing the fingerprint templates and being installed in the secured part of the building = "no fingerprint data at the door")

http://kb.supremainc.com/knowledge/doku.php?id=en:tc_technology_rs-485_wiring_guidelines&s[]=daisy&s[]=chain

Because for some installations, TCP/IP or Wiegand cannot work:

- Either the TCP/IP number of lines is limited by the customer

- or the readers are distant from each others or from the controller (TCP-IP = 100m, RS485 = 1.2 km, Wiegand ~150m) <= average distance (this varies with cable type and other factors)

Indeed, unlike video surveillance where manufacturers, installers, and end-users alike clamored for interoperability, the same dynamic simply does not exist in access control.

What's your opinion on why it 'simply does not exist'?

Can it be tied to the megapixel/innovation race to some degree? Meaning that the pace of video technology was far accelerated from access control. People demanded interoperability because they invariably ended up with some new cool camera that only worked thru the web page it came with.

Also, you could tolerate the inevitable glitchyness of interoperability better, e.g. motion detection might not work. But a door can't be glitchy at all.

OSDP is not just for readers. You can use it for alarm points too. It's focus is "supervised" devices that would be used under the direction of an "panel".

That makes sense. How many alarm systems/sensors are currently using OSDP?

The core reason ONVIF faces such headwinds in access control is that the video analogy is wrong: In the video comparison, access panels aren't the cameras, they are the VMS! Readers are the cameras, and OSDP is doing fine there.

Most of the manufacturer's "value add" in access control is put in the panel, just as in video it's put in the VMS. Yes, you often have ONVIF from the VMS down to the camera, but you never use ONVIF from the VMS up. You use the VMS provider's SDK for that, because ONVIF won't have each manufacturer's VMS value-add properties. Hence 3 years on, ONVIF C is largely just the open protocol to talk to the Axis A1001, and little else.

The other reality of the access industry is that it is more expensive to install a door than hang a camera on a wall, and nobody wants to pay for that directly. So those costs are paid for by hardware markups. This in turn requires stricter channel management. Thus any attempt to commoditize access panels tends to be resisted by integrators because it is much harder to mark up, giving little no incentive to sell it.

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