Horizontal Cabling for Video Surveillance Guide

By IPVM Team, Published Jan 03, 2020, 09:09am EST (Info+)

There are a few options when it comes to professionally installing horizontal cabling for video surveillance networks. The three options examined here are:

  • 'Direct Attached', where the first terminates the field cabling with an RJ45 modular plug, and connects it directly to the camera.
  • 'Jack & Patch', where the cables are first terminated to a jack or patch panel, and then connected to security devices by patch cord.
  • 'MPTL', Modular Plug Terminated Link is a hybrid of the two methods above with a female jack / patch panel at the head end and an RJ45 modular plug on the far end connecting directly to the camera.

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Inside this report, we explain the options, tradeoffs, and elaborate on the pros and cons of each method.

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Comments (18)

Aren't most RJ45 plugs designed for stranded cable? Would you recommend using stranded wire for the horizontal run instead of solid?

Great report!

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VERY few 8P8C "RJ45" plugs are rated for stranded cable and they're definitely not a stock item where I shop. The pins have to be shaped differently than a solid conductor plug so as to ensure they don't push past the strands, and make good contact.

Same goes for stranded CAT5; I don't know that even exists in a thousand foot pull box. Stranded cable has less current carrying capacity than solid and is primarily for flexibility, e.g. patch cords. I can't think of an application where stranded CAT5 would be necessary as a main link.

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Stranded cat5/6 is readily available. We actually use it when adding devices for elevator work. The stranded wire is less prone to breaking over time due to the constand bending.

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Thanks U1 - I recommend solid cable for horizontal/structured cabling. You can purchase RJ45 mod tips that work on either or that are optimized for conductivity specifically for stranded or solid based on the design of he teeth.

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I don’t see the “use a bunch of beanies to splice wires” method.

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Typical slammer patch panel! Certify this!

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Thanks U2, now my eye is twitching thinking about installers using b-connectors on network drops ;)

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Whoa, hold on there money-bags... You only use the blue ones when they are getting installed underground. Duh.

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Thinking is one thing. I loved opening up a wall plate to find that was the method used for a network extension.

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Before I start my response, I laughed so hard at the thought of the bunch of beanies. But one thing I don't see mentioned, is the "twist" aspect of a twisted pair. The twists are to prevent cross talk on the wires. When splitting these wires out, it is important to punch down or crimp them as close to the twists as possible. I have seen many installs where the wire is strait for one to two inches leading up to the RJ45 connector. This generally is bad and should be avoided. A "beanies" method would be just wrong.

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I've often wondered about this, so maybe someone with more knowledge can answer this for me.

My understanding was CAT cables use twisted pairs to reject EXTERNAL interference from AC electromagnetic fields and RFI, because Ethernet uses DC current which has absolutely no inductance. "Crosstalk" between pairs should theoretically not be possible, and the varying twist rates is to enable the differential signalling to do its job at the device end.

Am I out to lunch or does my thinking have some merit?

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Appears to be both. Wiki

Twisted pair cabling is a type of wiring in which two conductors of a single circuit are twisted together for the purposes of improving electromagnetic compatibility. Compared to a single conductor or an untwisted balanced pair, a twisted pair reduces electromagnetic radiation from the pair and crosstalk between neighboring pairs and improves rejection of external electromagnetic interference. It was invented by Alexander Graham Bell.[1]

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My understanding was CAT cables use twisted pairs to reject EXTERNAL interference from AC electromagnetic fields and RFI, because Ethernet uses DC current which has absolutely no inductance.

there are two types of twisting going on;

1) twisting between two wires in a pair

2) twisting of the 4 twisted pairs

the first type of twisting reduces local AND alien crosstalk, the second reduces only alien.

the varying twist rates of different pairs make it so the signals don't run exactly parallel to each other for any significant length of cable.

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The twists are to prevent cross talk on the wires. When splitting these wires out, it is important to punch down or crimp them as close to the twists as possible. I have seen many installs where the wire is strait for one to two inches...

yes, this is why you should always* use these

*never ;)

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Dear All,

One remark from Europe :)

On every network trainings trainers emphasises to not exceed 100m (330 feet) as a overall part of ONE (direct) connection between active devices (e.g. switch and PC/cam).

Based on your drafts I see more then 100m meters - e.g. in JPCM method when we add all maximum values in total we have almost 120m (390 feet).

From practice I know that we should count no more than 80-90m for a main connection + (plus) patchcord connections between devices (switch/camera/PC).

I wonder what is your opinion about this? Maybe in US you have some other standards?

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Am I the only one who for some time did not understand horizontal cabling?

I couldn't really understand the difference between running the cable left to right versus up and down other than the string in riser cable.

Yes for a while I thought horizontal cabling meant running the cable left to right...

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I couldn't really understand the difference between running the cable left to right versus up and down other than the string in riser cable.

electrons have a small but finite mass, so it's understandable that they are more reluctant when they have to "take the stairs" ;)

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Hasn’t changed... still left or right no matter how you look at it. Very different than up and down!

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