Ex-Arecont Leaders Launch Super Resolution Startup Entropix

Author: John Honovich, Published on Jun 05, 2015

Innovation in video surveillance is weak.

The 'big' thing is either lower prices or crowdsourcing for consumers kits.

Now, one startup is aiming high with advanced technology, having secured a million dollar seed investment.

In this note, we examine Entropix, based on an interview with their co-founder, examining their approach and prospects.

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Comments (34)

Sooo are they calling it a on demand FaaS (Forensics as a service) ? All these dumb cameras around and they get infused with Entropix technology become little minions that serve the Grid. They just take all the information in the Fast and Furious 7 kind of moment for common people to visualize. The Grid with all its computing power does all the Analytics, people counting, LPR/LPC etc. on demand as fast as google fiber can deliver.

It searches all your metadata and will predicts what you are going to do next. If it cant predict it will tell you what you are going to do.

Sigh if it only supported open protocols at the moment :)

Vincent, you may want to do marketing for them, lol

From what I understand, they are not working on video analytics right now. Their focus is on the super resolution element.

But, in general, I do think cloud analytics have potential. Related: Genetec Cloud LPR Examined

I just want to apply "Valencia" Filters instantly to my videos.

I'm confused, are they going to be using 'new camera hardware' or 'standard commodity camera hardware'?

I'm surprised you're not more skeptical on this one. For instance would you agree that:

"Resolution of video surveillance systems, which has been rising year after year, has finally hit a hard physical barrier of light diffraction limit beyond which it cannot increase” said Dr. Michael Korkin

Even if the pixel size is at the diffraction limit, there's nothing limiting sensors from getting larger, except for cost, which is not a 'hard physical barrier', but rather one that becomes easier to overcome as more demand creates greater economies of scale. Like in the recent larger sensors of Sony and Axis among others.

Not to mention multi-imagers solutions, which Dr. Korkin is obviously familiar.

We often bemoan companies who tacitly play off end-users CSI misconceptions, did you notice Entropix does this explicitly:

Hollywood creates expectations of extreme forensic zoom and video quality enhancement techniques... At ENTROPIX we’re excited about bringing those capabilities to surveillance customers at commodity pricing.

Do you think that 'one million dollars' in this day and age are likely to develop, produce and ship technology that will improve resolution 9x?

I'm not saying it's impossible, but it seems a long shot, no?

"I'm confused, are they going to be using 'new camera hardware' or 'standard commodity camera hardware'?"

New camera hardware means you can't load an app on Axis Q series (e.g.) and make this happen. Standard commodity camera hardware is their claim that whatever secret sauce they add can be done on 'standard commodity camera hardware'.

"I'm surprised you're not more skeptical on this one."

They have a track record of delivering on video surveillance products. I'd be more skeptical if it was a kid out of school or my neighbor down the block.

"Even if the pixel size is at the diffraction limit, there's nothing limiting sensors from getting larger"

Agreed. This is a prime risk for them. That is point #2 in my key questions section.

"Do you think that 'one million dollars' in this day and age are likely to develop, produce and ship technology that will improve resolution 9x?"

First, it's not a real-time continuous improvement. I'd be more skeptical about that, just given the computational load of doing this 24/7/365.

Secondly, if they make progress, they are going to get more money. Listen, IC Realtime just got $15 million for basically scotch taping 2 fisheye cameras together.

There's definitely risk here, but it is clearly people who have credible backgrounds and expertise to try it.

[NOTE: Poster is a Founder of Entropix]

Undisclosed A... Your skepticism is healthy and appreciated however you're making several assumptions about our technology that I'm afraid are inaccurate. John's post mentions that we are using super-resolution technologies, powered by massively parrallel GPU-based super computing. However that is only one layer of our multi-layered approach. (a key layer to be sure)

You also state that nothing is preventing sensor size from getting larger except cost and that economy of scale can solve that problem. That is not technically true, as those involved with making the 'wafers' of CMOS sensors are quite aware. The die for such wafers involves mathematics of wafer 'yield' that rise exponentially with sensor size and yield per wafer. The cost curve is much steeper than you might imagine. See graphic here:

Not to mention that if you go higher sensor size you have also exponentially raised the cost of lensing for such a camera. See Avigilon 7k camera for reference.

You also stated:

"Do you think that 'one million dollars' in this day and age are likely to develop, produce and ship technology that will improve resolution 9x?"

Again, you're making large assumptions that are incorrect. Where did you come up with the idea that we plan to "develop, produce and ship" our technology from this article? We raised a million dollars in seed round of funding to continue our work and expand our team. We are most certainly going to raise additional funding as it would be impossible to go into production of sophisticated hardware on mass scale without doing so.

Again, your skepticism seems healthy and we look forward to you getting to analyze and scrutinize our technology in person some time next year.

Hello Nathan.

...however you're making several assumptions about our technology that I'm afraid are inaccurate. John's post mentions that we are using super-resolution technologies, powered by massively parrallel GPU-based super computing. However that is only one layer of our multi-layered approach.

I'm not assuming super-resolution/super-computing is all you do, but it is all you say you do on your website. Where are the other layers mentioned?

Indeed the first sentence of your press release is

Entropix, Inc. secures Series Seed funding to develop GPU-powered super-resolution video surveillance technology.

As for your comnent

You also state that nothing is preventing sensor size from getting larger except cost and that economy of scale can solve that problem. That is not technically true...

You then explain yields and give further reasons why you believe that the cost of creating such higher resolution sensors will limit their adoption. Even if this is the case, (which is certainly debatable), this is no "hard physical barrier" that we've finally "hit". Remember the Entropix statement under question here is:

"Resolution of video surveillance systems, which has been rising year after year, has finally hit a hard physical barrier of light diffraction limit beyond which it cannot increase

Please clarify this statement as it stands and then I will be glad to discuss wafer yields further.

In addition your "fisking" skips right by my comment about multi-imagers, and their ability to create high resolution cameras without larger sensors. What is the response to this objection?

Where did you come up with the idea that we plan to "develop, produce and ship" our technology from this article?

from the part that said

Entropix is aiming to start shipping products by the end of 2016

I assume you have to develop and produce before shipping?

We are most certainly going to raise additional funding as it would be impossible to go into production of sophisticated hardware on mass scale without doing so.

Here we agree, my comment was only pointing out the difficulty of meeting a ship date 20 months away with only this round. More funding is necessary, as you say.

Having said that, I am actually optimistic about the benefits of SR and don't doubt that Entropix will deliver value here. Most of the skepticism relates to your overly rhetorical and bombastic copy, not to the underlying technologies.

You're right: especially in IR, it's not that rare to find cameras who's effective resolution is less than their focal plane array pixel count, because their lenses can't focus a point of light down to a single pixel. Focal plane arrays have evolved to the point that, often, the lens is the factor that limits the total system resolution. Manufacturers could easily choose a lens that can focus light to the pixel size of the selected focal plane array; or alternatively they could easily choose a focal plane array that has larger pixels. But either option would increase price, which is counter to current market forces.

Enter super resolution. Video provides a stream of images, and some information within each frame is a little different than information in any of the other frames. Super resolution algorithms "boil down" the information collected across multiple independent images into a single image that contains some of that extra goodness. Collection over time (or over space if using multiple imagers) can provide higher resolution imagery beyond the Rayleigh diffraction limit of any single imager.

Speculating as to why it might need custom hardware, I'm guessing that compression discards detail that is mostly below the human perceptual threshold but that is important to the super resolution algorithms. If this is the case, then the words "forensic video quality" might be an implicit acknowledgement that streaming raw uncompressed video might exceed available bandwidth, but that it's no problem to export select clips whenever desired.

It sounds like an exciting new capability that could be very useful. I recall a relevant experience from the dark ages when I had a Commodore Amiga. For its time, it had unprecedented video processing capabilities. I was showing it off to a group that happened to include a prosecuting attorney. He asked me to assist him on a case which in part depended upon video evidence of marginal quality. We were able to digitize the clip and use the Amiga's image processing capabilities to improve the clip's clarity. He was so pleased that he came back for more assistance whenever his video evidence could benefit from improved clarity. This personal experience, plus the many cases in which IPVM members have asked for help with video of marginal quality, suggests that a rich market probably exists for this sort of capability. It's exciting to see a highly qualified and proven team tackle this sort of industry advance, and it'll be interesting to see what they deliver in terms of limitations, quality, and pricing.

"We were able to digitize the clip and use the Amiga's image processing capabilities to improve the clip's clarity. He was so pleased that he came back for more assistance whenever his video evidence could benefit from improved clarity. This personal experience, plus the many cases in which IPVM members have asked for help with video of marginal quality, suggests that a rich market probably exists for this sort of capability."

Horace, good feedback.

My main concern for this type of application is that on a per camera basis, this need is typically rare. In other words, if you have a 100 camera system, how many times per year do you really need to apply super resolution? Maybe a few at most?

To that end, I think it is pretty critical that Entropix makes it inexpensive and easy enough that people can justify using it or else you get in the Briefcam situation where most users say "Wow, that's neat but I can't just spending X more for every camera when I may only use it every so often."

You're right, of course. The special camera issue is huge. If compression is the issue, often camera bandwidth requirements are quite limited, and with today's network topologies, most of today's cameras could probably get a software update to stream raw to the server, but then what? Storage is getting less expensive, but when would it be cost effective to store two weeks or a month of raw video for every camera? I think it'll be quite a long time yet.

BTW, by now the technique of super resolution is well understood and the basics are pretty much a commodity in the research community. However, moving it into a commercial product can still offer many challenges. I wonder if someone, somewhere who owns an early patent is quietly biding their time until someone becomes so successful that they're worth suing? I hope these guys have sewed up that risk with ownership in some early intellectual property.

BTW, by now the technique of super resolution is well understood and the basics are pretty much a commodity in the research community.

Horace, do you know of any peer-reviewed papers involving actual optics where 2MP image was forensically increased to effectively 18MP? Or anything even close?

I'm skeptical, but would love to see them succeed.

1) I've not seen any super-resolution research papers claiming 9x resolution improvement in real world scenarios. Love to read such a paper if I missed it.

2) My impression, along with others in these comments, is that this cannot be done effectively after compression. This means it must be done in the camera which implies a large compute engine with the associated power and cost in the camera. A tough sell. Even an FPGA-based approach, which might beat a standard processor, won't be cool or cheap.

3) If it all works, then you still have the problem of commpressing 18Mpix at 30fps to send the super-resolution video to the NVR. I don't know of 18Mpix 30fps H.264 compresssion engines (they are coming, but aren't here yet). Plus storing 18Mpix at 30fps, without compressing it so much that you loose the benefits, won't be cheap.

I hope I'm wrong on point 1 and 2. SuperResolution gets very cool if it can enhance a 2Mp/30fps stream AFTER compression. That would be great.

[Note: Poster is from Entropix]

Craig, thanks for your comment!

1) I've not seen any super-resolution research papers claiming 9x resolution improvement in real world scenarios. Love to read such a paper if I missed it.

Regarding the super-resolution research, there is “classic” super-resolution which required multiple frames of video to work and relied on motion between frames, and then there is a more recent approach which does not require any of that. It does work in real-world scenarios producing very impressive results. We have developed it further, as well as the related camera architecture using the same image sensors and same processors as in today's commodity cameras. It relies on an off-camera computational power in the cloud that is orders of magnitude higher. To give you an idea of how much computation is involved, it would take minutes per frame to produce the same result using the computational power available on-camera.

2) My impression, along with others in these comments, is that this cannot be done effectively after compression.

Compression is always an issue, however our technology works under a typical range of compression settings, short of extreme levels of compression.

3) If it all works, then you still have the problem of commpressing 18Mpix at 30fps to send the super-resolution video to the NVR.

We do super-resolution on demand in the cloud from our camera's stream. The stream itself is fully compliant with standard decoders, however it includes an additional data component produced on-camera which provides for an extra resolution increase and is utlized in the off-camera computation.

Michael, I assume that even though you plan to use similar hardware in your cameras as others, that you are not able to use an off-the-shelf camera's API, to obtain the 'secret sauce' sensor data that you require.

VAPIX, for instance, allows access to image data before compression, but its sounds like the camera could easily be overwhelmed if you tried to do to much with it in real-time. Do you agree or is there another reason why you cannot have an embedded agent running on a camera's native OS obtain the needed SR data?

I'm asking only because looking superficially at the image enhancement cloud play, one would imagine the ease of adoption would be far greater without a required hardware component.

Lastly, without revealing any secrets, are you doing anything in the near-field as part of your innovation?

Thanks.

I'm asking only because looking superficially at the image enhancement cloud play, one would imagine the ease of adoption would be far greater without a required hardware component.

This technology is not "image enhancement cloud play", and not even in the category of "image enhancement". It is in the category of "hardware-enabled software". The new camera architecture is essential for computational super-resolution reconstruction to work, and vice versa. The value to be delivered to, and experienced by the user is a product of both.

"The new camera architecture is essential for computational super-resolution reconstruction to work, and vice versa."

To A's point, that is a business / market limitation, since your camera market share is 0%.

So either you now build up your own camera offerings or you find a mega-manufacturer to license or acquire your technology to embed in theirs. Both are possible, neither are simple.

John, we don't see this as a limitation -- to the contrary, this is a major market opportunity in a commodity market. A comparable value today is 30-50 times more expensive, not to mention the slow frame rate. If the frame rate were any higher, it would require 10x bandwidth / storage, and power / heat. All major selling points, like wide area coverage with a single camera, forensic image quality, improved low light performance. Plus, the effective resolution of the upper range megapixel cameras today is quite diffferent from their nominal megapixel count. In fact, under anything but a bright sunny outdoor conditions, a camera with 1.4 um pixels has a lower effective resolution than a camera with 2.8 um pixels, see this paper (especially Fig 1). Our offering addresses all of these points.

Not buying this. And you completely ignored my concerns.

Whether or not your technology is good or bad, since it cannot be added to existing cameras easily, it will require A or B above. If you think either are easy from a sales / business perspective, you are deluding yourself.

"A comparable value today is 30-50 times more expensive, not to mention the slow frame rate."

This is a classic Arecont style scam claim. It's wrong and misleading on multiple levels.

(1) You are not claiming to provide super high-resolution continuously. Your conventional super high res competitors (like Avigilon) are. You force users to request processing on-demand, connecting to a cloud service with unclear VMS integration. This reduces the value and increases the complexity versus a 'regular' super high-resolution camera.

(2) The claim about comparable value being 30-50 more expensive does not make sense. Let's say the comparable is an Arecont Pro camera at ~$6,000 to $10,000. This implies you are selling your cameras at $200 each with no recurring cost. I don't believe you can or will price your products at this level.

(3) More importantly, the 30-50 times claim ignores the point that almost no one chooses to pay $6,000 to $10,000 per camera (the market share of those cameras are something like 0.01%). Those cameras are not overall very attractive in the marketplace.

From the claims so far, it appears you will have a 'regular' HD camera with a 'resolution burst' mode.

It's neat but very few people are going to see it as delivering 30-50 times more value than the 4K / 12MP cameras that are already shipping and are not going to require a cloud service and requesting for processing each time they want increased resolution.

I respect what you are doing on the technology side but you seem to be greatly underestimating the business challenges of taking this to market.

If you think either are easy from a sales / business perspective, you are deluding yourself.

John, I recall that when I made a decision to join my last employer back in 2005 it was a five-person startup with zero market share. That was a few hundred million dollars in sales ago... The first multi-sensor panoramic cameras I designed were introduced at ISC West 2006. Everyone finally caught up by ISC West 2015, and this market segment I predict will grow to quarter billion annually within five years. Like they say, "There is no substitute for experience" :)

(1) You are not claiming to provide super high-resolution continuously. Your conventional super high res competitors (like Avigilon) are. You force users to request processing on-demand, connecting to a cloud service with unclear VMS integration. This reduces the value and increases the complexity versus a 'regular' super high-resolution camera.

Nobody in video surveillance ever needed the entire field of view captured and streamed at the highest resolution. This is done out of necessity because there are no other options. You are paying for it in camera cost, bandwidth and storage cost, power and heat, reduced frame rate, poor low light performance... and all of that is entirely wasted except for a small region of interest! Resolution on demand is a much better value proposition. The Moore's Law does not apply to image sensors and lenses, they don't scale in cost over time -- don’t expect an 8K camera and beyond to become available for $200. That is essentially what we are setting out to do.

(2) The claim about comparable value being 30-50 more expensive does not make sense. Let's say the comparable is an Arecont Pro camera at ~$6,000 to $10,000. This implies you are selling your cameras at $200 each with no recurring cost. I don't believe you can or will price your products at this level.

Entropix cameras will be priced well within the regular commodity camera price range. Nothing in the new camera architecture suggests high cost.

(3) More importantly, the 30-50 times claim ignores the point that almost no one chooses to pay $6,000 to $10,000 per camera (the market share of those cameras are something like 0.01%). Those cameras are not overall very attractive in the marketplace.

Exactly my point. Their market share is tiny, and they are not attractive at that price. Imagine if you could get comparable image quality and image detail at the price of a 1080 camera, and have that at 30 fps with great low light performance and WDR...

It's neat but very few people are going to see it as delivering 30-50 times more value than the 4K / 12MP cameras that are already shipping and are not going to require a cloud service and requesting for processing each time they want increased resolution.

The 30-50x value comparison was not in relation to 4K- 12 MP cameras, but to 7K/8K cameras and beyond. If you expect that a low-cost small optical format 4K - 12 MP camera gives you 4K - 12 MP effective resolution, then make sure it is a bright sunny day at 100,000 Lux. Otherwise you may be getting the same or worse than a 1080 camera resolution due to small-pixel low SNR and poor dynamic range, please refer to Fig 1 in the paper I linked to in my earlier post. Even some of IPVM's own tests seem to point in the same direction.

I respect what you are doing on the technology side but you seem to be greatly underestimating the business challenges of taking this to market.

Thanks, John! All three of us, the founders of Entropix, have been cautioned about this very thing on a few earlier occasions in previous companies we launched or helped build. If only we listened.. :)

What an arrogant answer that misses the point.

Your multi-sensor example is not appropriate to your new technology. Multi-sensor cameras are basically multiple cameras in a same box and are therefore easy to integrate. What you are proposing now is far harder to integrate. It's more like adding in Briefcam than multi-sensor. Good luck getting the big VMSes to spend money integrating your cameras with 0% market share.

"The 30-50x value comparison was not in relation to 4K- 12 MP cameras, but to 7K/8K cameras and beyond"

So now you are claiming 30MP super resolution by the end of next year?

You really should keep quiet rather than set expectations you can't deliver.

Nothing in the new camera architecture suggests high cost.

So no reset button?

This technology is not "image enhancement cloud play", and not even in the category of "image enhancement".

This is the wrap-up statement from your press release:

"Hollywood creates expectations of extreme forensic zoom and video quality enhancement techniques... we’re excited about bringing those capabilities to surveillance customers at commodity pricing”. Entropix.com

In addition, this is the genuinely impressive before/after image provided by Nathan, showing what you "are able to do".

If you want to call this technology "hardware-enabled software", that's up to you, but I think its a mistake to deride someone for using the term "image enhancement", since it is a natural and functional description that most anyone would use here. 'Hardware-enabled software' might play well with the VC crowd, but for most security pro's its a non-starter.

The snake-oil detector is shaking on the lab bench but has not started blinking. A million dollars sounds low for startup doing anything. If there were mathematical magic that made it so you could get 9x by shipping your pixels to the cloud I would think someone would know about it. Patented==bad, get over it, we know this from many many many repeated bad experiences. Yes I know the investors love it. I work for the customers, not the investors. Never underestimate the amount of magic you can pull out of that whole "cloud" thing. It's not weird to hear engineers calmly talk about summoning thousands of processors with zettabytes of storage. Processor per pixel, anyone?

Net conclusion: money sounds low, having trouble beliving the hype but no reason to challenge it. Yet. Not thrilled with the lineage.

I work for the customers, not the investors...

Well, they are looking for a Director of Engineering:

This is an excellent ground floor opportunity to become a key early player in a recently funded technology startup, currently based in Los Angeles area and running in full stealth mode.*We are looking for a Lead Developer / Director of Engineering with both creative vision and technical know-how.

*First rule of 'full stealth mode' is...

Not thrilled with the lineage.

Hi Rodney. I'm curious...

Dr. Korkin was the VP of Engineering, author of numerous camera patents and lead inventor of the first ever full line of H.264 surveillance cameras ranging in resolution from 1.3mp on up to 40mp and including several largely unique multi-sensor cameras. Before that he was the founder and CTO of a company that was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for having created an FPGA-based massively parallel AI super-computer for Japan's Key Technology Center.

I left that same camera company to found a software company that launched and grew an enterprise VMS product into a profitable and respected international company doing business in nearly one hundred countries.

So with those two resumes coming together to co-found a new cloud enabled camera hardware and enterprise software massively parallel super computational imaging startup... What I'm curious about is what "lineage would thrill you?" :)

"Not thrilled with the lineage."

I don't want to speak for Rodney, but he could be alluding to the two of you having worked for Arecont. As you might have heard, Arecont is not the most beloved manufacturer in the industry....

So by High resolution, they mean actually doing this properly and using correctly sized sensors and Lens? that'd be amazing, remake the Bosch for $600..

or we just continue to wait for hik to do it?

Right, Undisclosed A. Thanks for prodding me from vague pontifications to real-world particulars. LOL. I got the sense that you already knew what to expect, so I did a bit of digging and I've not found credible reports of resolution improvements approaching 9x.

Using Google, I'm not seeing recent work on the limitations of superresolution, which tends to suggest that the matter is pretty well settled.

A 2002 paper by Baker and Kanade of Carnegie Mellon suggest that significant improvements can be made by modelling recognized characteristics of the image. For example, if a text is recognized as Times New Roman 12 point and the letters are recognized, one could argue that it is possible to reconstruct the original to an infintessimal resolution. However, their paper only achieved about a 2x improvement for text, which is comparatively easy to recognize. They concluded with a fact that analytics users might already know -- that recognition has been impractical for complex scenes such as surveillance video.

A 2004 IEEE paper coauthored by Lin and Shoum of Microsoft examined the question, "Do fundamental limits exist for superresolution?" For multi-image superres that is restricted to linear transformations, they concluded that real-world improvements would likely not exceed 2x, and even synthetic improvements (eg improving images that have been degraded with known techniques) would likely barely exceed 5x. They suggested that other methods such as rotations, nonlinear transforms, and frequency based analysis, might marginally improve these expected outcomes.

Mr. Korkin, are you able to shed any light on "a more recent approach which does not require any of that?" Thanks!

Horace -- if you interested in the theory of it, I would like to refer you to this seminal 2012 paper: http://statweb.stanford.edu/~candes/papers/super-res.pdf. If you are prepared to commit to its 48 pages of math, there is a hint there suggesting that a higher super-resolution factor may be feasible based on a more recent insight that was unavailable to the authors you cited, just a few years earlier. National Science Foundation awarded the author with its highest prize calling his research “nothing short of revolutionary”.

Having said that, please note that we are not exclusively relying on computational super-resolution alone to produce the final result under real world scenarios, the overall super-resolution factor is partially achieved via the new camera architecture itself. Also, note that the factors in these and other papers are linear, while we are using square values: in terms of these papers our factor is in the range 3x-3.3x.

...in terms of these papers our factor is in the range 3x-3.3x.

A picture (or two) is worth a thousand words.

Can you share a before and after image?

Certainly that would be interesting.

Undisclosed A... Here is a picture demonstrating what we are able to do. The original full scene image is 1mp (720p). The top forensic zoom window is the native digital zoom from the original resolution. The bottom zoom window shows what the same image looks like after run through our post processing engine and achieving a 9x increase in the effective pixel count and useful resolution for that area.

This is an example of what we are looking forward to being able to achieve in near real-time for surveillance end users and essentially why we refer to it as a sort of "CSI" button on-demand. It is also scalable up to any common resolution available on the market right now including 4k native. In order to show you these native video clips and post processed full clips, I'd need to get you under a signed NDA.

This looks pretty amazing, thanks!

The stream itself is fully compliant with standard decoders, however it includes an additional data component produced on-camera which provides for an extra resolution increase and is utlized in the off-camera computation.

Curious, for this 1MP image, what is the size in bytes of the 'additional data component'?

More super-resolution technology, this one slated for Fujitsu phones later this month.

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Milestone Co-Founder Invests In Anti Theft Spray SelectaDNA on Sep 06, 2018
Milestone's Co-Founder Henrik Friborg has invested in CSI Protect, exclusive US dealer of forensic marking startup SelectaDNA, a company that...

Most Recent Industry Reports

'Sticker' Surveillance Camera Developed (CSEM Witness) on Nov 16, 2018
The Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) has announced what it calls the: world’s first fully autonomous camera that can be...
ISC East 2018 Mini-Show Final Report on Nov 16, 2018
This is our second (updated) and final show report from ISC East. ISC East, by its own admission, is not a national or international show, billed...
Facial Detection Tested on Nov 16, 2018
Facial detection and recognition are increasingly offered by video surveillance manufacturers. Facial detection detects faces in an image/video...
Throughtek P2P/Cloud Solution Profile on Nov 15, 2018
Many IoT manufacturers either do not have the capabilities or the interest to develop their own cloud management software for their devices....
ASIS Offering Custom Research For Manufacturers on Nov 15, 2018
Manufacturers often want to know what industry people think about trends and, in particular, the segments and product they offer.  ASIS and its...
Hikvision Silent on "Bad Architectural Practices" Cybersecurity Report on Nov 14, 2018
A 'significant vulnerability was found in Hikvision cameras' by VDOO, a startup cybersecurity specialist. Hikvision has fixed the specific...
French Government Threatens School with $1.7M Fine For “Excessive Video Surveillance” on Nov 14, 2018
The French government has notified a high-profile Paris coding academy that it risks a fine of up to 1.5 million euros (about $1.7m) if it...
Integrator Credit Card Alternative Divvy on Nov 13, 2018
Most security integrators are small businesses but large enough that they have various employees that need to be able to expense various charges as...
Directory of Video Intercoms on Nov 13, 2018
Video Intercoms, also known as Video Door-Phones or Video Entry Systems, have been growing in the past decade as more and more IP camera...
Beware Amazon Go Store Hype (Tested) on Nov 13, 2018
IPVM's trip to and testing of Amazon Go's San Francisco store shows a number of significant operational and economic issues that undermine the...

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