Directory Default IP Camera Addresses

Author: Derek Ward, Published on Feb 13, 2015

Initializing IP cameras can be tedious and frustrating, made worse because manufacturers have no standardization, with some supporting DHCP, some using default IP addresses, and some using both.

In this post, we have compiled a list of 14 IP camera manufacturers (including ACTi, Arecont, Avigilon, Axis, Bosch, Canon, Dahua, Geovision, Hikvision, Panasonic, Pelco, Samsung, Sony, and Vivotek), what IP addressing they support by default, and the pros and cons to these methods. Additionally, we have included a directory of links to each manufacturer's discovery tool.

Default IP Addresses

This table lists the most common IP camera manufacturers as well as their support for DHCP, default IP address, or both.

************ ** ******* *** ** ******* *** ***********, **** ***** because ************* **** ** ***************, **** **** ********** ****, **** using ******* ** *********, *** **** ***** ****.

** **** ****, ** **** ******** * **** ** ** IP ****** ************* (********* ****, *******, ********, ****, *****, *****, Dahua, *********, *********, *********, *****, *******, ****, *** *******), **** IP ********** **** ******* ** *******, *** *** **** *** cons ** ***** *******. ************, ** **** ******** * ********* of ***** ** **** ************'* ********* ****.

Default ** *********

**** ***** ***** *** **** ****** ** ****** ************* ** well ** ***** ******* *** ****, ******* ** *******, ** both.

[***************]

****:

  1. ******* ****** ******* ** *** **** * ******* ** *******, nor ** **** *** **** ************ ********* (***.*). *******, ********** **** *** ***** ***** ******** to ******** *** ******* *** ******.
  2. ******** *** ******* ** *** **** ******* ** *********, *** will *** * ******** ******* ** ** **** ****** ** present.

Default ** *******

** ***, *** **** ****** ****** ************* *** *** ******* IP ******* ** ** ******* **** *****, *** ******* ** a ***** ******* ** ** **** ****** ** *******. **** makes ************ ******, ***** ********** *** **** ** ******** ******* at **** ***** ******* * **** *******, *** **** *** install ***** (*** *****) ** ****** ** ********* ** ****. Without **** *******, ******* **** ***** ** ******* ** *** at * ****, ***** ********* ************ ****.

*******, **** ********* * ******* ***** ** ******* ******** * reliable ****** ** ***** ***** ** **** ****** ** ******* or ***** **** ** ********* * ****** ******. **** ******* support ********, ***** ****** ***** * **** ** ******* ** it **** * ****** ******* **** ** * **** ******. However, ***** ** * ***** ******* ********** *** *** *** each ********* **'* ** ******* (** *** *** *******), ***** may ** ********* ** ** *****. ** ***** *****, ** may ****** **** ** **** ** ***. ******* ** ****, a ***** ******* ** ******* ** ******** *********.

** ******* **/** ****

*** ******* ******* ******* **** *** * ******* ** *******, such ** *******. ** ***** *****, *** **** ** ******** to *** * *********** ********* **** ***** ****** **** ******* connected ** *** **** ******. *******, ** ********, ** **** personally **** **** **** **** ** ******** ******* ** *** LAN, **** ********* ******** ** *** ******** ***** *** ********* tool. ******* ** ****, **** ****** ** ****** ****, ********* for ***** **** ******** *****.

Camera *********/********** *****

** ****** ***** ******* ** ****** ** ****, ***** **** a *** ** **** ******* *** ****** **** * ********* IP *******. **** ********, *********** ************ ********* ***** *** ****. These ************ **** *** ***** ******* *** ***** ******* (***** on*** ******* ***). **** **** ****, ***** *** ********* ****** ** *******, though **** ***** ******* ***** *************, ******** **********, ** ****.

***** ** **** ******** *********/********** ***** *** ****** *************:

***** *******

***** **** ************-******** *****, ***** *** *** ***** ****** **** to ******** ******* ** *** ***** *******:

  • *** *********:********* ******* ****** ********* ******* ***** ****** ** ***** *****. *******, *** ************* ** these ******** ****** ********* ** *** *** *** *** ****** model, *** **** *** ********* *** ** ********* ** ************'* own *****.
  • ** ********:*******, ** ******** ******* ****, ********** *** *** **** ********* **** *** **** ***** ** ******** *** ****** *******. These ***** ** *** ******* **-********** ** ************* ** ************ tools **, *** ******* * ****** ***** ** **** ** addresses.

********

***** ******* *, ** *********** *********, **** ** *********** *** IP ******* *** **********. ** ***** ****, ***:*** ***** ******* * **** ** ****** ********* *** ******* Passwords.

Comments (12)

Now THIS is very handy!

A couple points to add:

1. I've run into a few cameras that will try DHCP first, then "fail over" to a default IP if none is provided by DHCP. I think a Panasonic was one of those. Most seem to just be one or the other out-of-the-box, though.

2. An IP scanner is handy, BUT the computer you're running it on must already be configured on the same subnet as the camera(s). Not a problem with DHCP, but if cameras are using 192.168.1.xxx but your computer is configured with 192.168.0.xxx, it won't find anything on an IP scanner (not that you'd be able to connect to those cameras anyway). Of course, there's a bunch of other parenthetical stuff here, like, this assumes you're directly connected to the same LAN as the cameras and not going through any kind of NAT or routing, etc.

IP scanners are also handy for finding other things on the network, like managed switches :)

Thanks for the info.

Where does the discovery methods that ONVIF Device Manager use fit into this scheme? It seems faster and better than most VMSes (for ONVIF devices), but I think it's pure IP, so Matt's caveats apply.

Samsung cameras can also be set up using the IP Installer tool, which does not require installation. Their VMS and NVRs can also discover their cameras and configure their IP addresses. NVRs can provide DHCP. Some NVRs will auto discover and configure cameras out of the box for easy small system setup.

IPInstaller utility

Cameras default to DHCP. If no DHCP is present then they will go to a static IP address of 192.168.1.100. (NVRs are typically 192.168.1.200).

The device manager is great for dealing with and assigning settings and IP addresses to many cameras at once...

Panasonic cameras actually default to 192.168.0.10 (The 192.168.0.253 is actually for some of their other "consumer" models, which look for DHCP first). You can use the EasyIP Setup utility to find cameras and change their IP addresses without installing any software.

EasyIP Setup Tool

Thanks for pointing both of these out. We've changed Panasonic and added the additional tools to the post.

IndigoVision products default to 10.5.1.10. 2-channel devices (ie. encoders) default the second channel to 10.5.1.11.

By the way, if a camera uses a default IP address that is outside of the range of your computer's current scheme, you can click on the "Advanced" tab of the TCP/IPv4 properties and enter additional IP addresses, subnet masks and gateways.

Yep, a trick I use often. Would recommend NOT using multiple gateways, though (and Windows will warn against this if you try). The gateway (aka "default route") tells the system what address to route through for addresses outside its own subnet... if you put the machine on the same subnet as the cameras, you don't need a gateway for it.

Also, be careful you don't give your machine an IP that's already in use on the network!

This is where the IP Networking course comes in handy :)

Matt, Agreed in principle. However, I have set multiple gateways on dual-port cards without a problem. Indeed, Windows squawks about it but that was the way our old Honeywell system was set up: one port for encoders and the second port for clients. Each VLAN had its own gateway on the switch.

Yeah, but it's different with multiple NICs or multi-port cards, or if you're doing funky stuff like load balancing, VLANs, etc. where the separate gateways have a specific purpose.

Main point is, if you're adding IPs to find a camera on a different subnet, it's just not necessary, and especially for someone just learning this trick, there's no point in adding to the confusion, especially if it might break proper operation and leave the noob confused. Add the IP, set the netmask appropriately, and you're good to go.

Really, if all the communications on a network will be with addresses in the same subnet (eg. everything you're connecting has a 192.168.1.xxx address and you don't need internet), you don't need a gateway configured at all; it exists for sending traffic to outside subnets.

I know YOU know all this, of course... :o)

I worked with GeoVision & double check with our tech team and found the discovery tool information posted for GeoVision IP device is incorrect on this page. You will want to use IP utility tool instead of Central Monitoring Software instead.

By default, all GeoVision IP devices have the IP address of 192.168.0.10 with default ID: admin and password: admin.

If the ID and password have been changed, press on "Default" button on the camera to apply default settings on the IP camera to bring back default ID and password.

You can download the GV-IP Device Utility from website at http://www.geovision.com.tw/english/5_8.asp

Select IP Camera -> DVR/NVR -> GV-IP device Utility to download.

The interface would look something like this:

Thank you for the feedback Vickee Liang! The Geovision IP Utility is now linked.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

Access Control Course Spring 2019 - Last Chance on Apr 19, 2019
This is the last chance to register for the Spring Access Control Course. IPVM offers the most comprehensive access control course in the...
Riser vs Plenum Cabling Explained on Apr 18, 2019
You could be spending twice as much for cable as you need. The difference between 'plenum' rated cable and 'riser' rated cable is subtle, but the...
The Fastest Growing Video Surveillance Sales Organization Ever - Verkada on Apr 17, 2019
Verkada has the fastest growing video surveillance sales organization ever. In less than 2 years, they already have more salespeople in the US...
Dahua Repositionable IR Multi-Imager Camera Tested on Apr 16, 2019
Dahua has released their first repositionable multi-imager camera, the Multi-Flex 4x2MP, claiming integrated IR, true WDR, and flexible...
Axis Supports HD Analog on Apr 15, 2019
In 2017, Axis declared 'Everything is IP': Now, in 2019, Axis has released support for HD analog, with their new encoders.  Why the change?...
ISC West 2019 Report on Apr 12, 2019
The IPVM team has finished at the Sands looking at what companies are offering and how they are changing their positioning. See below for 50+...
Pole Mount Camera Installation Guide on Apr 11, 2019
Poles are a popular but challenging choice for deploying surveillance cameras outdoors. Poles are indispensable for putting cameras at the right...
UK Installer CCTV Aware - Flat Pricing, No Salespeople on Apr 10, 2019
This is a different kind of company. They do flat pricing, they do not have any salespeople and 50% of their sales are sold and booked...
Spring 2019 50+ New Products Directory on Apr 08, 2019
We are compiling a list of new products for Spring 2019 and have over 50 already. Contrast to Fall 2018 New Products Directory and Spring 2018...
Spring 2019 IP Networking Course- Register Now on Apr 04, 2019
Register now for the Spring 2019 IP Networking course here. Just $299 for the course. This is the only networking course designed specifically...

Most Recent Industry Reports

H.265 Usage Statistics on Apr 19, 2019
H.265 has been available in IP cameras for more than 5 years and, in the past few years, the number of manufacturers supporting this codec has...
ACRE Acquires RS2, Explains Acquisition Strategy on Apr 19, 2019
ACRE continues to buy, now acquiring RS2, just 5 months after buying Open Options. One is a small access control manufacturer from Texas, the...
Access Control Course Spring 2019 - Last Chance on Apr 19, 2019
Register for the Spring Access Control Course. IPVM offers the most comprehensive access control course in the industry. Unlike manufacturer...
Riser vs Plenum Cabling Explained on Apr 18, 2019
You could be spending twice as much for cable as you need. The difference between 'plenum' rated cable and 'riser' rated cable is subtle, but the...
Verint Victimized By Ransomware on Apr 18, 2019
Verint, which is best known in the physical security industry for video surveillance but has built a sizeable cybersecurity business as well, was...
Milestone Drops IFSEC on Apr 18, 2019
Milestone has dropped out of Europe's largest annual security trade show (IFSEC 2019), telling IPVM that they "have found that IFSEC in EMEA no...
The Fastest Growing Video Surveillance Sales Organization Ever - Verkada on Apr 17, 2019
Verkada has the fastest growing video surveillance sales organization ever. In less than 2 years, they already have more salespeople in the US...
Door Operators Access Control Tutorial on Apr 17, 2019
Doors equipped with door operators, specialty devices that automate opening and closing, tend to be quite complex. The mechanisms needed to...
Securadyne CEO: IPVM 'Entertaining For An Ignorant Few' on Apr 16, 2019
Securadyne's CEO Carey Boethel is unhappy with IPVM's report - Failed Integrator Rollup, Securadyne Sells to Guard Giant Allied. Indeed, he...
Dahua Repositionable IR Multi-Imager Camera Tested on Apr 16, 2019
Dahua has released their first repositionable multi-imager camera, the Multi-Flex 4x2MP, claiming integrated IR, true WDR, and flexible...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact