End Users Mentioning IPVM In Sales Meetings?

I have never used IPVM articles as apart of my sales pitch. However, I am surprised at the number of times IPVM comes up when talking with end-users. Especially larger, enterprise customers, as they tend to take more time to learn and understand the industry.

I do not think this is bad, in fact, the conversations usually are very positive. I wonder if at times the customer is testing to see if I know the industry or just peddling a product.

Have others experienced this as well?

NOTICE: This comment was moved from an existing discussion: Avigilon CEO Attacks Asian Companies Cyber Insecurity


We have certainly seen an increase in the number of end-users buying IPVM memberships, with it being much more common now to see end-user signups than just a few years ago.

They are primarily larger organizations (Fortune 500 companies, airports, etc.), which makes sense (at least to me), as these are the kinds of organizations that are used to turning to companies like Gartner before making large technology purchases. These kinds of buyers do not want to read 'trade mags', they want more direct analysis and data.

Agreed. More to the point I stated above, I found that end-users that took time to understand the industry, typically had an IPVM account, made for some of the best sales meetings. Not that the products I represented at the time where free of public scrutiny, not at all, but it did open up for frank and real conversations. This typically would validate what I was presenting and helped to grow trust with the end-user.

Even on a deeper layer, some customers would test sales reps by pressing some of recent news from the industry. Too many reps are out pushing a product, without care or consideration to what the industry is doing. For an informed customer, this would be a turn off.

It's like the guy that called on me when I was an integrator. "We offer DVD quality video on all of our recorders". I replied, "what does that mean, what is DVD quality? what is that in low light, with what cameras, what frame rate, etc."

He hung up on me.

It's like the guy that called on me when I was an integrator. "We offer DVD quality video on all of our recorders". I replied, "what does that mean, what is DVD quality? what is that in low light, with what cameras, what frame rate, etc."

He hung up on me.

That is a great sales qualification tactic. Smart customers will call you out on it quickly, and let you weed them out, they are not your audience. Anyone who lets you get away with that line, you can probably tell them anything that suits you from there out with minimal questioning on their part.

Unfortunately, I am only half joking.

Too many reps are out pushing a product, without care or consideration to what the industry is doing.

Related, and I will disclaim that this varies - some are very good, some are not - quite a number of industry people have significantly out of date knowledge. They will say things that are not incoherent but reflect the state of things from 3, 5 or 7 years ago. And that's a problem because what was good advice in 2013 is often quite poor advice today.

As IPVM approaches a decade, we see the evolution ourselves in how we every few years re-write most of our core training reports to reflect those changes.

Agreed.

I am not try to stroke the IPVM ego, but the value of a site like this is that there is a constant, up-to-date stream of industry information. I am glad there are end-users, competitors and consultants that leverage this site. It is sad how many RFPs still spec 95% copper shielded RG59. There is a group of professionals that care about what they are doing and strive to learn and grow. While we may not always agree, I have found the dialog to be very valuable.

About 10 years ago I once consider building a publication like this, peer reviewed analysis of the industry, even tried to find some backers, started a small blog... but had zero time to make it happen. This exceeds my original vision.

I'm one of those end-users that name drops IPVM...

In March when speaking at Hanwha's partner conference I stated that IPVM is my most trusted source when selecting security cameras.

Additionally I bring up IPVM survey results to back-up my experience when an integrator asked me why I dislike Arecont so much.

I encourage all of my clients that specify video surveillance and other security technology to join IPVM. I tell them that its the "Consumer Reports" of the industry and that the discussion board alone is worth the price of membership.

I say the exact same thing

I agree, I also remind them that if the vendor has some sort of issue with the IPVM site being "loud" they're welcome to suggest other web sites one might use.

I also use IPVM when I have to scold an integrator for screwing up. "Tell your boss to suck it up and buy you an IPVM subscription so you can at least read the tutorials." is a really easy way to explain to integrators that one expects them to know what they're doing.

I have recommended IPVM to many end users and integrator's. I received a call back from a engineering manager researching a million dollar purchase with the comment "Best money I have ever spent, saved my hundreds of hours".

I believe that there is value in what IPVM does so that being the case have written into specifications that all bidders MUST provide IPVM Calculator drawings with their RFP response. Look closely you may have caught it in Fed-Biz.

Helps weed-out jobs of want-a-be installation companies that do not have the talented interest in doing what is right.

Just my 2-cents.

Do you accept submissions from other tools that achieve the same result?

I have been in the room when consultants have exhibited knowledge of IPVM. I have yet to experience a customer or end user mention IPVM. That is not due to lack of trying on my part. An educated customer is less likely to look at NVRs and more likely to look at VMS.

I have yet to experience a customer or end user mention IPVM. That is not due to lack of trying on my part.

Integrator: May I ask you where you went for your initial research on this system?
Customer: I just googled it.
Integrator: Sure, but what site did you actually use for up-to-date, unbiased and in-depth reviews?
Customer: You mean like Yahoo reviews?
Integrator: Not exactly, more like something more industry focused, for professionals by professionals, maybe run by an outspoken blogger who takes on the industry just for kicks?
Customer: What is this charades?
Integrator: Ok, its 4 letters, 1 vowel...

LOL, well played.

maybe run by an outspoken blogger who takes on the industry just for kicks?

No, this is "The Blogger" or "The Blog". There are no other blogs.

I recommend IPVM as a information resource to all my customers that I feel have a genuine interested in security tech......I feel having a knowledgeable (but also very busy) end user really makes for a great working relationship.

I've not only referenced IPVM to a number of vendors but have strongly advised the vendor to take the IPVM classes.

It's, frankly, pretty frustrating when I, as the end user, know more about camera and access systems than the vendor/rep. At times I ask questions about codec, WDR, Gain Control, and so on, and they look perplexed. They know about frame rates but not bit rates.

While some vendors are pretty well versed in access and video systems, I've found this vacuum of knowledge with my own vendors as well as at some booths at ISC and ASIS.

Their limited knowledge hinders my selection of the right system for my facility, so I rave about the IPVM classes and encourage them to enroll but, to my knowledge, not one has done so.

I saw a Facebook post from an Aviligon director in LATAM that upload the post from Hickvision related the problem with the Cracked Security Codes, and mention that they can help all those customer of this "chinese" company to change their systems.

Sergio,

Thanks for letting us know. We do not allow this. I've emailed you directly to ask for more information to stop this.