VideoIQ Analytic Bridge Reviewed

By: Ethan Ace, Published on Mar 20, 2012

VideoIQ has announced the first product in its Rialto Series, a four-channel analog encoder with on-board storage, or analytic bridge, as they refer to it. This product is specifically aimed at small installations, especially used for outdoor intrusion detection. In this note, we examine the Rialto's features, comparing it to existing VideoIQ offerings and to rival outdoor intrusion system, Videofied.

Overview

While VideoIQ currently has a single-port encoder in the iCVR line, the Rialto-A4 four-port encoder is a completely new platform for VideoIQ, with different processing capabilities than previous generations. The A4 has the following features:

  • H.264 and MJPEG encoding
  • D1 resolution/30 FPS framerate on all channels
  • 40 GB or 160 GB solid state storage, sufficent for approximately 5-6, or 20-25 days, respectively, based on normal activity. This storage is dedicated, built into the unit, and may not be swapped.
  • Bounding boxes embeddable in video. Previously, bounding boxes were only available in the VideoIQ View client, not in other VMSs or exported clips.
  • PTZ control on all channels

As with other products in the VideoIQ line, the Rialto may be integrated with other VMSs, streaming video and analytic alarms, or may be used as a standalone unit, essentially acting as a 4-port analog DVR, in conjunction with VideoIQ's VIEW client software.

The following is an image of the Rialto, standalone wall-mount form factor:

The Rialto-A4 will be available in April 2012, through VideoIQ's distributors and integrators. MSRP pricing is $1,960 for the 40 GB model, or $2,660 for 160 GB.

Changes to Edge Storage

The reduction in on-board storage is the change which might stand out most in this offering. Other models in the line contain on-board 2.5" hard drives, in capacities up to 750 GB. The maximum storage available in the Rialto, however, 160 GB for four cameras, is the minimum available in VideoIQ's standard definition iCVR. Given VideoIQ's increased focus on remote guarding in the past year, this makes sense, as typically incidents are reviewed in short order, making longer-term storage unnecessary. However, this is a fundamental shift away from VideoIQ's traditional marketing of edge storage as a better alternative to centralized systems.

Positioning

The two strongest fits for this product are likely:

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  • Outdoor intrusion detection: One of VideoIQ's strengths has been coverage of outdoor areas where both simple video motion detection, as well as intrusion detection sensors such as PIRs, are prone to false alarms. The Rialto fits in these applications, as well, at a price lower than using multiple iCVRs.
  • Remote guarding upgrades: For users with installed cameras, who wish to notify off-site guards upon incidents, the Rialto may be attractive.

Competitive Comparison

The main competitor which comes to mind when discussing outdoor intrusion detection is Videofied. Compared to the Rialto-A4, Videofied differs in the following ways:

  • Autonomous: The Videofied system may be completely battery-powered, using a built-in GPRS cellular radio for alarm communications. VideoIQ requires local power, or a custom battery/solar power solution, along with an external cellular router, if no infrastructure exists. This alone may be the major deciding factor in many remote locations without connectivity.
  • Detection Range: VideoIQ cites a much larger detection area, up to 350', than Videofied, whose range is limited to 40'.
  • Video quality: Videofied uses monochrome, 320x240 resolution video clips for alarm verification only, with no live look-in possible. VideoIQ is capable of D1 resolution, 4x that of Videofied, and may be accessed in real-time.
  • Video options: The Rialto-A4 allows for camera choice, so monochrome, color, thermal, wide dynamic, or other cameras may be used if needed, as opposed to Videofied's monochrome cameras.

Though they are very different, these two products will overlap in many instances. Assuming a four-camera (or MotionViewer, in the case of Videofied) system, we arrive at the following price comparisons:

Videofied (all prices estimated street price)

  • Videofied XTIP Panel: ~$435 USD, estimated street price
  • 4 x Videofied MotionViewer, ~$500 each: $2,000
  • Videofied CMA Keypad: $220
  • Total: $2,665

VideoIQ Rialto-A4, with 4 Analog Cameras

  • VideoIQ Rialto-A4, 40GB: $1,750, estimated street price
  • 4 x Analog outdoor bullet cameras, ~$150 each: $600
  • 4-camera power supply: ~$50
  • 500' Siamese RG-59: ~$250
  • Total: $2,650

For four cameras, these two options are within the same range for equipment. Videofied likely has a labor advantage, as no cabling is required to MotionViewers. Ultimately, however, the decision to use one or the other will likely hinge upon whether or not infrastructure exists, in which case Videofied may be stronger, or whether live viewing and camera options are more important, making the Rialto-A4 more attractive.

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