VideoIQ Analytic Bridge Reviewed

By: Ethan Ace, Published on Mar 20, 2012

VideoIQ has announced the first product in its Rialto Series, a four-channel analog encoder with on-board storage, or analytic bridge, as they refer to it. This product is specifically aimed at small installations, especially used for outdoor intrusion detection. In this note, we examine the Rialto's features, comparing it to existing VideoIQ offerings and to rival outdoor intrusion system, Videofied.

Overview

While VideoIQ currently has a single-port encoder in the iCVR line, the Rialto-A4 four-port encoder is a completely new platform for VideoIQ, with different processing capabilities than previous generations. The A4 has the following features:

  • H.264 and MJPEG encoding
  • D1 resolution/30 FPS framerate on all channels
  • 40 GB or 160 GB solid state storage, sufficent for approximately 5-6, or 20-25 days, respectively, based on normal activity. This storage is dedicated, built into the unit, and may not be swapped.
  • Bounding boxes embeddable in video. Previously, bounding boxes were only available in the VideoIQ View client, not in other VMSs or exported clips.
  • PTZ control on all channels

As with other products in the VideoIQ line, the Rialto may be integrated with other VMSs, streaming video and analytic alarms, or may be used as a standalone unit, essentially acting as a 4-port analog DVR, in conjunction with VideoIQ's VIEW client software.

The following is an image of the Rialto, standalone wall-mount form factor:

The Rialto-A4 will be available in April 2012, through VideoIQ's distributors and integrators. MSRP pricing is $1,960 for the 40 GB model, or $2,660 for 160 GB.

Changes to Edge Storage

The reduction in on-board storage is the change which might stand out most in this offering. Other models in the line contain on-board 2.5" hard drives, in capacities up to 750 GB. The maximum storage available in the Rialto, however, 160 GB for four cameras, is the minimum available in VideoIQ's standard definition iCVR. Given VideoIQ's increased focus on remote guarding in the past year, this makes sense, as typically incidents are reviewed in short order, making longer-term storage unnecessary. However, this is a fundamental shift away from VideoIQ's traditional marketing of edge storage as a better alternative to centralized systems.

Positioning

The two strongest fits for this product are likely:

Get Video Surveillance News In Your Inbox
Get Video Surveillance News In Your Inbox

  • Outdoor intrusion detection: One of VideoIQ's strengths has been coverage of outdoor areas where both simple video motion detection, as well as intrusion detection sensors such as PIRs, are prone to false alarms. The Rialto fits in these applications, as well, at a price lower than using multiple iCVRs.
  • Remote guarding upgrades: For users with installed cameras, who wish to notify off-site guards upon incidents, the Rialto may be attractive.

Competitive Comparison

The main competitor which comes to mind when discussing outdoor intrusion detection is Videofied. Compared to the Rialto-A4, Videofied differs in the following ways:

  • Autonomous: The Videofied system may be completely battery-powered, using a built-in GPRS cellular radio for alarm communications. VideoIQ requires local power, or a custom battery/solar power solution, along with an external cellular router, if no infrastructure exists. This alone may be the major deciding factor in many remote locations without connectivity.
  • Detection Range: VideoIQ cites a much larger detection area, up to 350', than Videofied, whose range is limited to 40'.
  • Video quality: Videofied uses monochrome, 320x240 resolution video clips for alarm verification only, with no live look-in possible. VideoIQ is capable of D1 resolution, 4x that of Videofied, and may be accessed in real-time.
  • Video options: The Rialto-A4 allows for camera choice, so monochrome, color, thermal, wide dynamic, or other cameras may be used if needed, as opposed to Videofied's monochrome cameras.

Though they are very different, these two products will overlap in many instances. Assuming a four-camera (or MotionViewer, in the case of Videofied) system, we arrive at the following price comparisons:

Videofied (all prices estimated street price)

  • Videofied XTIP Panel: ~$435 USD, estimated street price
  • 4 x Videofied MotionViewer, ~$500 each: $2,000
  • Videofied CMA Keypad: $220
  • Total: $2,665

VideoIQ Rialto-A4, with 4 Analog Cameras

  • VideoIQ Rialto-A4, 40GB: $1,750, estimated street price
  • 4 x Analog outdoor bullet cameras, ~$150 each: $600
  • 4-camera power supply: ~$50
  • 500' Siamese RG-59: ~$250
  • Total: $2,650

For four cameras, these two options are within the same range for equipment. Videofied likely has a labor advantage, as no cabling is required to MotionViewers. Ultimately, however, the decision to use one or the other will likely hinge upon whether or not infrastructure exists, in which case Videofied may be stronger, or whether live viewing and camera options are more important, making the Rialto-A4 more attractive.

Comments : PRO Members only. Login. or Join.

Related Reports

Average Frame Rate Video Surveillance 2019 on May 23, 2019
What is the average frame rated used in video surveillance systems? In IPVM's 2011 statistics, the average was 6-8fps increasing to ~10fps in...
Access Control Job Walk Guide on May 22, 2019
Significant money can be saved and problems avoided with an access control job walk if you know what to look for and what to ask. By inviting...
LifeSafety Power NetLink Vulnerabilities And Problematic Response on May 20, 2019
'Power supplies' are not devices that many think about when considering vulnerabilities but as more and more devices go 'online', the risks for...
Maglock Selection Guide on May 16, 2019
One of the most misunderstood yet valuable pieces of electrified hardware is the maglock. Few locks are stronger, but myths and confusion surround...
Bank Security Manager Interview on May 15, 2019
Bank security contends with many significant threats - from fraudsters to robbers and more. In this interview, IPVM spoke with bank security...
Access Control Request to Exit (RTE) Tutorial on May 13, 2019
For access controlled doors, especially those with maglocks, 'Request to Exit', or 'RTE' devices are required to override electrified locks to...
Hikvision DeepinView Camera Analytics Tested on May 08, 2019
Hikvision is expanding its 'deep learning' offerings with a new camera series called 'DeepinView' claiming false alarm reduction and improved...
ADT's Top Dealer "The Defenders" Sued 20+ Times on May 07, 2019
ADT's largest authorized dealer, The Defenders, has been sued more than 20 times since 2012, IPVM has verified through analyzing legal...
Dahua ePoE Long Distance UTP / Coax Tested on May 03, 2019
Dahua's Enhanced PoE (ePoE) line is claiming extended video and power transmission over 600m without repeaters, with devices interchangeable via...
Verkada Cloud VMS/Cameras Tested on May 02, 2019
Verkada is arguably the most ambitious video surveillance startup in many years. The company is developing their own cameras, their own VMS, their...

Most Recent Industry Reports

NJ Law Requires Apprenticeship For Public Works Integrators on May 24, 2019
Few integrators do a formal apprenticeship program. However, now a NJ law is requiring any integrator on public works projects (such as state...
Security / Privacy Journalist Sam Pfeifle Interview on May 24, 2019
Sam Pfeifle is best known as the outspoken former Editor of Security Systems News. After that, he was publications director at the International...
Verkada Video Quality Problems Tested on May 23, 2019
Verkada suffers from numerous video quality problems, not found in commercial IP cameras, new IPVM testing of Verkada vs Axis and Hikvision...
Average Frame Rate Video Surveillance 2019 on May 23, 2019
What is the average frame rated used in video surveillance systems? In IPVM's 2011 statistics, the average was 6-8fps increasing to ~10fps in...
Access Control Job Walk Guide on May 22, 2019
Significant money can be saved and problems avoided with an access control job walk if you know what to look for and what to ask. By inviting...
ASCMA / Monitronics Declares Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Plan on May 22, 2019
Monitronics is entering into Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The company, also called Ascent Capital Group Inc., aka ASCMA, aka Brinks Home Security,...
US Considers Sanctions Against Hikvision and Dahua on May 22, 2019
The US government is considering blacklisting "up to 5" PRC surveillance firms, including Hikvision and Dahua, Bloomberg reported, with human...
Dahua USA Celebrates 5 Years of Errors on May 21, 2019
Dahua USA is, in their own words, 'celebrating' 5 years in North America or as trade magazine SSN declared: Dahua Technology finds success in...
Axis ~$150 Outdoor Camera Tested on May 21, 2019
Axis has released the latest in their Companion camera line, the outdoor Companion Dome Mini LE, a 1080p integrated IR model aiming to compete with...
Covert Facial Recognition Using Axis and Amazon By NYTimes on May 20, 2019
What if you took a 33MP Axis camera covering one of the busiest parks in the US and ran Amazon Facial Recognition against it? That is what the...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact