Successful Facial Surveillance Case

By: John Honovich, Published on Jan 07, 2013

Real time facial surveillance is hard to do - accuracy issues, false alerts, cost and deployment complexity all conspire against it. This is why, more than a decade after deployments started they still remain remarkably uncommon. However, one application - self exclusion list - offers great promise and at least one practical example. In this note, we examine what key features make it work where most others have failed.

Self Exclusions List

Certain municipalities establish self exclusion lists to casinos for people who have gambling addictions. The goal is to help those people stay away from casinos and, if they go, block their entry.

The challenge for casinos is that they have huge numbers of visitors plus thousands who are on the self exclusion list. This makes it very hard for even trained personnel to block those on the list.

Ontario Case

Recently, Ontario implemented a facial surveillance system to solve this. From speaking with the manufacturer, a few logistical elements greatly help the solution that are not common in other use cases:

Subject Actively Enrolled

Unlike criminals, people who are on the self exclusion list voluntarily enroll into the system as such:

This greatly improves accuracy as the system has multiple, head on, high quality images. By contrast, facial surveillance systems often depend on grainy, outdated or bad angle images.

Get Video Surveillance News In Your Inbox
Get Video Surveillance News In Your Inbox

Restricted Entrances

The manufacturer says that these casinos have few choke point entrances. This makes it far less expensive to deploy cameras / infrastructure. By contrast, many retailers and public facilities have many egresses, driving costs up significantly and creating issues when people walk in at angles to the camera.

No Need to Catch Everyone

Since the harm of having a self-excluded person enter the casino is modest, especially compared to a criminal, the system does not need to catch everyone. Even if it identifies some persons on this list, it can be viewed as successful. This allows tuning to reduce operational issues.

False Positive Minimized

Specifically, the manufacturer acknowledges that the systems are tuned for lower sensitivity, reducing the number of false positives that frequently drive operators crazy. Facial recognition sensitivity is almost always adjustable:

  • High sensitivity ensures the highest percentage of subjects on the watch list are detected but increases the number of non subjects falsely matched
  • Low sensitivity reduces the percentage of subjects on the watch list detected but decreases the number of false alarms triggered (i.e., non subjects matched)

Because of the 'adversary' being monitored, the system is tuned to help avoid one of the most common sources of system failure.

Conclusion

While this is not your typical security application, it does highlight a number of common operational issues and how they can be avoided in certain use cases.

Comments : PRO Members only. Login. or Join.

Most Recent Industry Reports

NJ Law Requires Apprenticeship For Public Works Integrators on May 24, 2019
Few integrators do a formal apprenticeship program. However, now a NJ law is requiring any integrator on public works projects (such as state...
Security / Privacy Journalist Sam Pfeifle Interview on May 24, 2019
Sam Pfeifle is best known as the outspoken former Editor of Security Systems News. After that, he was publications director at the International...
Verkada Video Quality Problems Tested on May 23, 2019
Verkada suffers from numerous video quality problems, not found in commercial IP cameras, new IPVM testing of Verkada vs Axis and Hikvision...
Average Frame Rate Video Surveillance 2019 on May 23, 2019
What is the average frame rated used in video surveillance systems? In IPVM's 2011 statistics, the average was 6-8fps increasing to ~10fps in...
Access Control Job Walk Guide on May 22, 2019
Significant money can be saved and problems avoided with an access control job walk if you know what to look for and what to ask. By inviting...
ASCMA / Monitronics Declares Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Plan on May 22, 2019
Monitronics is entering into Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The company, also called Ascent Capital Group Inc., aka ASCMA, aka Brinks Home Security,...
US Considers Sanctions Against Hikvision and Dahua on May 22, 2019
The US government is considering blacklisting "up to 5" PRC surveillance firms, including Hikvision and Dahua, Bloomberg reported, with human...
Dahua USA Celebrates 5 Years of Errors on May 21, 2019
Dahua USA is, in their own words, 'celebrating' 5 years in North America or as trade magazine SSN declared: Dahua Technology finds success in...
Axis ~$150 Outdoor Camera Tested on May 21, 2019
Axis has released the latest in their Companion camera line, the outdoor Companion Dome Mini LE, a 1080p integrated IR model aiming to compete with...
Covert Facial Recognition Using Axis and Amazon By NYTimes on May 20, 2019
What if you took a 33MP Axis camera covering one of the busiest parks in the US and ran Amazon Facial Recognition against it? That is what the...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact