Successful Facial Surveillance Case

By: John Honovich, Published on Jan 07, 2013

Real time facial surveillance is hard to do - accuracy issues, false alerts, cost and deployment complexity all conspire against it. This is why, more than a decade after deployments started they still remain remarkably uncommon. However, one application - self exclusion list - offers great promise and at least one practical example. In this note, we examine what key features make it work where most others have failed.

Self Exclusions List

Certain municipalities establish self exclusion lists to casinos for people who have gambling addictions. The goal is to help those people stay away from casinos and, if they go, block their entry.

The challenge for casinos is that they have huge numbers of visitors plus thousands who are on the self exclusion list. This makes it very hard for even trained personnel to block those on the list.

Ontario Case

Recently, Ontario implemented a facial surveillance system to solve this. From speaking with the manufacturer, a few logistical elements greatly help the solution that are not common in other use cases:

Subject Actively Enrolled

Unlike criminals, people who are on the self exclusion list voluntarily enroll into the system as such:

This greatly improves accuracy as the system has multiple, head on, high quality images. By contrast, facial surveillance systems often depend on grainy, outdated or bad angle images.

Get Notified of Video Surveillance Breaking News
Get Notified of Video Surveillance Breaking News

Restricted Entrances

The manufacturer says that these casinos have few choke point entrances. This makes it far less expensive to deploy cameras / infrastructure. By contrast, many retailers and public facilities have many egresses, driving costs up significantly and creating issues when people walk in at angles to the camera.

No Need to Catch Everyone

Since the harm of having a self-excluded person enter the casino is modest, especially compared to a criminal, the system does not need to catch everyone. Even if it identifies some persons on this list, it can be viewed as successful. This allows tuning to reduce operational issues.

False Positive Minimized

Specifically, the manufacturer acknowledges that the systems are tuned for lower sensitivity, reducing the number of false positives that frequently drive operators crazy. Facial recognition sensitivity is almost always adjustable:

  • High sensitivity ensures the highest percentage of subjects on the watch list are detected but increases the number of non subjects falsely matched
  • Low sensitivity reduces the percentage of subjects on the watch list detected but decreases the number of false alarms triggered (i.e., non subjects matched)

Because of the 'adversary' being monitored, the system is tuned to help avoid one of the most common sources of system failure.

Conclusion

While this is not your typical security application, it does highlight a number of common operational issues and how they can be avoided in certain use cases.

Comments : PRO Members only. Login. or Join.

Most Recent Industry Reports

HD Analog vs IP Guide on Jul 16, 2019
For years, HD resolution and single cable signal/power were IP camera advantages, with analog cameras limited to much lower resolution and...
How To Troubleshoot Wiegand Reader Problems - Inverted Wiring on Jul 16, 2019
Wiegand is the dominant method of connecting access readers, but problems can arise for installers. In fact, one of the most difficult reader...
ZeroEyes Gun Detection Startup on Jul 16, 2019
A gun detection video analytics startup, ZeroEyes, is being led by a group of 6 former Navy SEALs, aiming to "save lives" by using AI to assist...
Motorola Acquires Watchguard, Adds to Vigilant And Avigilon on Jul 15, 2019
2 years ago, Motorola had no position nor relevancy to video surveillance. Now, they own major video surveillance, LPR and body camera providers...
Hikvision Global News Reports Directory on Jul 15, 2019
Hikvision has received the most global news reporting of any video surveillance company, ever, ranging from the WSJ, the Financial Times, Reuters,...
Vivotek Trend Micro Cyber Security Camera App Tested on Jul 15, 2019
Vivotek and Trend Micro are claiming five million blocked attacks on IP cameras, with their jointly developed app for Vivotek cameras. This new...
Beware African 50,000 IP Camera Contract Scam on Jul 12, 2019
A “Nigerian Prince” scam for the video surveillance market is going around. You, or at least we, could be lucky enough to be the single bidder for...
Axis ARTPEC-7 P1375-E Camera Tested on Jul 12, 2019
Axis claims the new P1375-E box camera with ARTPEC-7 chip delivers "clear, sharp images in any lighting condition." But how well does it do? We...
Last Chance - Camera Course Summer 2019 on Jul 11, 2019
Last day to register is Thursday, July 11, 2019. This is the only independent surveillance camera course, based on in-depth product and technology...
Nortek Blue Pass Mobile Access Reader Tested on Jul 11, 2019
Nortek claims BluePass mobile readers are a 'more secure and easy to use approach to access', but our testing uncovered security problems and...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact