Interview With Law Enforcement On Surveillance

By Carlton Purvis, Published Apr 30, 2013, 12:00am EDT (Info+)

We recently interviewed International Association of Chiefs of Police experts about various issues, uses and best practices for police agencies regarding video surveillance. We touched on topics ranging from storage and codec frustrations to crime displacement and drones. In this post, we recap the conversation and provide the complete transcript.

Inside, see law enforcement comments on:

Smartphones ******** ***** **** **** *******

*** ******* ** ***** ** *** cameras ******** ******** ********** **** **** are *** ** ** ***** *** spots, *** **** ** ** * point. **** *** ****** ******* ****** and ****** ******* ******** **** ********* ******** over **** ***** ******* *** **********. The ***** **** ***** ******* *** nowhere **** ** **. ***** ** is **** ********** *** *********, **** dealers, *** *******, ** **** ** their ******** *****, **** ***** *** cameras ** **. **** ****** ***'* care ***** *** *******, ****** ** learn ** **** ** ***** ****. 

"**** **** ** *** **** ***** drugs *** ****** ** *** ************ *** ******* *** ***** ** congregate ***** ******* *********** **** **** to ... *** **** ** ******* is *** ****** ** **** *******. What ******* ** *** ******. *** method ******* **** **********. **’* ******** by *********.

***** *** **** ** ******* ** front ** *** ****** ******* ******** doing *** *********** ** ***** ** the ****** ... *’* *** **** that *** ************ **** ***** ***** is **********. **’* ** ********** ** work ****** *** **** ** *** camera *** ***** *******. "

*** *******, ****** **** ***** **** clothing ** **** **** ******* ***** faces ** *** ** ************ ** front ** *** ********* ******* **** ** ******* ********. 

**** *** *********** *** *** **** of ** ****** ** ************** ********** crime ** ******* **********: ***********.

“ *** ******** ************ **** *********** and ***** ***** ** ************* ******* probably **** **** ****** ** ****** some ** ***** ****** ****** ** behind *** ******** ******** ********** ************ ** ** ***** ****** ... *** ************ ***** ** ***** of ****** ***** *** *** ****** is ******* ******** ** *** *** guys ***** ***** ************ **** **** it ****** **** ***** ** ** the ******.”

Public-Private ************

******-******* ************ ******* *** *********** ******** and ******* ******** *** ******** **** common. *** ******** ******* ******* **** can ****** ***** ************ **** *** less ***** **** ******* **** **** do *** **** ** ********. ******** say ********** ******* ** ********** ******** in ***** *************. ** **** *****, the **** ******** ********** *** ********** ******* to **** **** ****** ** ***** cameras ***/** *******. **** ** **** the ******* *** ** *** ***** why ******-******* ************ *** ******* ********: 

“**’* **** ********* *****. *** ****, if **’* ***********, ** **** *** police ********** *****’* **** ** **** the **** ** **** *******, *********** ***** systems, *** ** *****, ** **** it ** *********** ******* *** **** to ****** *** ******* **** ***** systems *******.” 

************ **** *******************. **** ********* *******, ****** *** often ***** **** * ****** ** different *******. ************ ******* *** *********** for ********** *** *** *********** ** collaborate *** *********** *** ***** ** recorded ** **** ** ****** ** collect *****.

License ***** *********** **********

*** ********** *** ********* ** *** “biggest **** ***** *** ****** ***** in *** ***” **** “**** ****** safety *********.” 

“*** * ***** ************ ** *** great ***** *** ****** *** *****’* paid ******* *******, ******* **** *** have ** ***** ***** ****** ***’** ******* *** * ****** boy *** *** **** ******** ** has **** ******* *****,” *** ****** said.

*** **** *** ******* ********* **** questioned *** **** ** ************ ******* rules *** *** ********** -- * technology **** ***** ****** *** ******* to ******* *** ***** **** ******* of *********** **** ***** ** **** to ***** * ******’* ********. *** enforcement******* **** **** **** **** ** figure *** *** **** *** **** is ********. 

“***** ** ************* ***** ** ***** of *** **** * ***** ** committed. [****] *****’* * ****** *** coming **** *** ******** ********* ** ***** *** ***** way, **** *** *********** ******* *** of ***** ******* ******. ** *** huge *********** ***** ... ** *****’* discovered *** ***** **** *** ****** on ************* *****.”

Other ******:

** ***** *** *** ****** *** technical ************ *** *********** *** **** surveillance. **** ***** *******, *******, ****************, and ***-***** *********** ** ***** ********.

*******

******* ** * **** ****** **** ****** the ******* ** ***** ***** * crime: 

“** *** **** ** *** ***** released ** ****** **** **** * great **** ** ****** ** ** through *** **** *****. **** ***** time. **’* *** ********* *** *** do ******* ** ******, **** **** today’s ****** ******* *******. ** ********* [not ********* ***** ** *** ******], in ** *******, ** *** ******* law *********** *****’* **** ** ************ **** **** * ************** ** protect ******** ********** *** **** **** their ******** ** *********.”

Legal ******** **** ******* *****Some of the first digital cameras used internal storage to record video which was a problem when it came time for investigators to provide original video in court. The original was on a drive inside the camcorder, (and had probably been recorded over because the same camcorder was used for multiple cases). This actually makes the first DVD copy the “original.”

******* ***** ********, ***** ** *** ******* **** allows *** ********** ** ***** ** be **** ** * ***** ** long ** *** ******** *** ** made ********* ** *** ***** *** all ****** **** *** **** ******. Law *********** ***** ********** *** ************** find **** ********** ***** ** ***** with *** ***** (**** *** ****** simultaneously) **** ****** **** ******** *** Rosario **********. ** ****** ******** ** make * **** *** *** ************ and **** *** **** (*** ********) to ** ** *** **** ****. It ***** **** ** *********** ***** in **** **** *** ********** *** original ** ** *****’* **** ** be **** ** ***** *** *** be ******** ** ******. 

****************

************ ******* *** ***** ***** ***** by *****-****-****, *** ******** ***** *******. Interoperability ****** *** **********. *** *********** agencies ***** **** ** *** *** more ******* ********* *** *************. 

“*** ******** **** * *** ** IP-based *******, *** ******** ** *** and **** **** *** ******, ** one ****** ******** * ******** ******* solution. **** **** **, *** **** happens [**] * **** * ******* video ****** **** *** *** ***’* router ** **, ******* ***’* ******, some ***** ***** ******** ***** ** running *** ********* ******, *** (** something **** *****) ** ******* * technical *********.”

***-*****

**** ******* ** ***-***** ***** ************, saying “*****’* ***** *** ***** ** being **** ** ******** *** ****** of ******** ** ******* **********.” 

******

*** ************************** ****** ** * *** ** increase************* ** * ********* ******. **** like **** *******:

  • **** *** ****** ** ******** *** faster ** ****** **** ***********.
  • **** **** **** **** *********** (** if *** **** ***, ** *** be ******** *** *******).
  • ** ** ***** ** *** * drone **** * ********* **** **** a ******. ************, *** ********* **** helicopters *** ***** ********** ****** ** damaged ********* ******** *** ***** **** can *** ** * *********. 

Dummy *******Law enforcement sentiment was that dummy cameras are a waste of money and a bad idea. If a person is worried about activity that needs to be deterred they’re “wasting everybody’s time” by opting for a dummy camera instead of a real camera. Said one interviewee, “I’ve not seen a dummy camera that looks real enough to fool most people ... The only way you can put up a camera that looks real is to put an actual camera up there. I think that’s more of a market ploy than anything.”

****: *** *** **** *** ******** transcript ** *** ****************

Comments (10)

I wonder how edge recording would play into the Rosario rule. I am thinking the video could be recorded on the data card in the camera, sent to the NVR as usual for backup and then the card could be pulled from the camera and attached to the case file. Make sense?

Brian, that does make sense. I think our Brian actually mentioned that during the call.

While the Rosario ruling is still in place, there is also the Best Evidence approach which make it a bit easier regarding evidence presentation if the original is no longer available. I really can't recall any LE agency out here on the West coast pulling the storage cards and booking those as evidence. From the IT side of things, the edge storage has some potential advantages but it would be very expensive pulling and replacing every time a criminal act was captured.

Back in the 90ds when digital cameras began to replace film there were a number of issues the courts needed to address but as time has gone on and the technology has become so common place, the issue of "Altered" video is almost never brough up. It's just accepted unless the defense feels there is some potential problem. Just think of just how many patrol officers use their digital cameras several times a day on various cases. If they booked in the card rather than download to a secure storage system just think what the costs would be.

We have had to submit numerous DVD copies of server based video to the Federal courts for lawsuits and not once has there even been a question regarding the storage or evidence aspect of the file. Even is there was an issue, all you need to to do is have the IT custododian of records appear and testify as to the method of capture and storage and that it was not altered.

For IP based system sales, it would be best to push the edge storage as a potential cost savings vs server based storage rather than the evidence aspect.

On original copies: I have never heard of an issue with video copies being suppressed if the recording has a digital watermark that can be verified in court. Having a watermark capability should be an automatic check box for anyone looking at purchasing a new system.

John, Did ya'll contact LEVA, or have you been to one of their annual conferences? They should be a go to group anytime folks want law enforcement input about video: www.leva.org .

Hi Gator, we didn't contact LEVA, however, two of the interviewees were members. It was those two who mentioned the court issues. We do plan to get in touch with LEVA for more on the law enforcement perspective.

I didn't see the full transcript -- is it elsewhere?

Michael, I'm fixing that link now and it will be back up shortly.

Great, thanks!

Michael, the link for the complete transcript is fixed.

Got it, thanks!

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