360 Thermal Camera (HGH IR Revolution)

By: Ethan Ace, Published on Sep 24, 2012

Everyone seems to be going 360, even thermal cameras now. While panoramic cameras provide sweeping coverage area, traditional approaches could not 'see' very far nor terribly well in the dark. Now, a new high end and expensive thermal 360 offering aims to overcome these issues for monitoring critical infrastructure and military bases. In this note, we examine the features and pricing of this thermal 360 compared to Sony XI and ipConfigure GWAS offerings.

Hardware Overview

HGH CameraThe IR Revolution 360 is a panoramic thermal imaging system with a cooled thermal sensor mounted on a rotating head, creating a full 360º panorama every second. The camera is typically mounted on its own tower or atop buildings. Three sensor configurations are available, with specified detection ranges between 1-3km, in vertical fields of view of 5º, 10º, and 20º. No optical zoom is provided, only digital zoom, as this sensor uses a fixed lens.

Instead of stitching together images, as some wide area surveillance systems (such as ipConfigure's GWAS system or Sony XIs), the thermal sensor creates the panoramic image by scanning each line in the vertical field of view. This image is output in a proprietary image format (i.e., not H.264 or MJPEG) for processing by their central server and client.

Software Overview

HGH's Windows-based client software, named Cyclope, is used for monitoring the system. This image illustrates this client and various window types it contains:

HGH Client Software

The full panaromic image can be seen at top, with a large zoom window below, and a smaller, more closely zoomed window on the center bottom. The image at left bottom is a "disk" view, a circular composite of the panorama. Users may create any number of zoom windows by clicking and highlighting areas in the panorama or disk views.

Cyclope also performs image analysis on the full panorama, detecting and tracking object. In the image above, this is illustrated by the bounding box around the center vehicle, with its travel path in red behind it. No classification of objects is performed, only highlighting of the object present, and alert generation. Operators must classify the object.

The system compensates for areas in constant movement by marking them as "normal" after a learning period. Things such as blowing tree limbs, a running generator, or wave movement are ignored by this feature, so they are less likely to generate nuisance alarms.

Get Notified of Video Surveillance Breaking News
Get Notified of Video Surveillance Breaking News

The manufacturer's video below shows the system in action:

Finally, Cyclope may perform recording functions in addition to monitoring. Images are not typically recorded in their raw format, as each camera generates about 1TB of data per day. Instead, if recording is desired, video is transcoded to an AVI format, 25-30% of the original size.

Integration

The IR Revolution 360 system may be integrated in two ways:

  • Outward: HGH provides an SDK for command and control software wishing to integrate to them. XML data with object position data is provided, to generate alerts and slew cameras to object positions. Due to their proprietary format, however, video is not provided to third-party systems. Given HGH's typical markets (defense, ports and airports, etc.), current integrations are limited to high-end software platforms not typically seen in commercial security, Ageon [link no longer available] and SRI Sarnoff.
  • Inward: HGH is capable of integrating with third-party sensor systems, such as seismic, acoustic, and others, which may generate alerts in the Cyclope software. Track data may also be used to control PTZ cameras via Pelco-D protocol, though this video is not displayed or recorded by Cyclope, but must be managed separately. Operators may also point and click on areas in the panoramic image to move integrated PTZ cameras to specific positions.

Pricing and Distribution

An IR Revolution 360 system has end user pricing of ~$250,000 USD. HGH has no channel sales through distribution, and sells direct to end users or through integrators.

Competitive Comparisons

The most likely competitive options for HGH are wide-area surveillance products such as ipConfigure's GWAS system or Sony's XIs, though significant tradeoffs exist among the three:

  • No Color/Zoom Option: While HGH uses only a thermal sensor, both ipConfigure and Sony use visible cameras as base, with thermal cameras an additional option. Both also offer zoom camera options directly integrated with their software, instead of in a separate interface. HGH requires separate integration of PTZ cameras.
  • Lower panorama resolution: While Sony and ipConfigure create panoramas in the hundreds of megapixel to gigapixel range, a full HGH panoramic image is between 3 and 12MP. This is due to the much lower resolution of thermal sensors than megapixel cameras used in ipConfigure and Sony.
  • Wider FOV width: Sony and ipConfigure offer a 270º max, compared to the full 360º of HGH. This may be a disadvantage in some cases, but we expect that many installations do not require all of the 360º panorama created by HGH, with dead space created by buildings or other structures.
  • Shorter FOV Height: The IR Revolution 360 is limited to a maximum 20º field of view. Both ipConfigure and Sony may be configured for 30º FOVs. This may be preferable in some locations, depending on the geography of the monitored area.
  • Much Faster Framerate: HGH creates a full frame every second. ipConfigure, by contrast, takes 24-70 second to create a single frame. Sony generates a frame every 15-75 seconds. While none are super high frame rate, HGH's view/image is updated much faster than comparables, which helps improve situational awareness of real time events.
  • Similar Price Range: All 3 units cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. While ipConfigure's GWAS can cost less than $100k, that is for a non thermal option. With thermal, both ipConfigure and Sony will likely be in similar if not higher pricing though with the added benefit of the color / megapixel camera.

The biggest advantage of the HGH is its (relative) fast frame rate. The biggest disadvantage is its lack of built-in color/megapixel camera.

1 report cite this report:

Startup: Thermal Radar on Sep 30, 2014
Two years ago, we covered a thermal panoramic system that covered huge areas, but came with a huge pricetag of ~$250,000. Now a startup...
Comments : Members only. Login. or Join.

Related Reports

Directory of 152 "Fever" Camera Suppliers on Jun 17, 2020
This directory provides a list of "Fever" scanning thermal camera providers to help you see and research what options are available. There are...
FLIR A Series Temperature Screening Cameras Tested on Jun 04, 2020
FLIR is one of the biggest names in thermal and one of the most conservative. While rivals have marketed fever detection, FLIR has stuck to EST...
Emitted Energy TempScan Thermal Screening System Examined on Apr 28, 2020
Emitted Energy has specialized in temperature measurement using FLIR cameras for industry and automation since 2013. Now, they have turned their...
Vivotek 4K S-Series Camera Tested on Sep 30, 2019
Vivotek's highest-end S-series camera claims "Supreme Night Visibility", "Smart IR II", "Smart Stream II", "WDR Pro for unparalleled visibility in...
Hanwha 4K Wisenet P Camera Tested on Jul 30, 2019
Hanwha claims "premium performance" and to "deliver the best in high resolution performance and efficiency" with their Wisenet P series 4K models,...
FLIR Saros Visible / Thermal Analytic Camera Tested on Jun 26, 2019
FLIR's Saros claims "accurate, actionable alerts" with a combination of 1080p visible and dual thermal sensors along with IR and white light...
4MP Camera Shootout - Axis, Dahua, DW, Hanwha, Hikvision, Uniview, Vivotek on Sep 24, 2018
4MP usage continues to climb, especially for low cost fixed lens models. To see who was best, we bought and tested seven 4MP models from Axis,...
FLIR Launches Saros on May 01, 2018
Has FLIR solved the video intrusion / remote monitoring problem or have they created an overkill, overly expensive device? FLIR has launched...
Hikvision Ezviz Mini Trooper Totally Wireless Camera Tested on Jun 13, 2017
Totally wireless cameras are a major growth trend in video surveillance, driven by consumer demands to eliminate wiring. Hikvision is now joining...
Panasonic Extreme H.265 Cameras Tested on Jan 26, 2017
Panasonic has released their latest generation, the i-Pro Extreme series, with enhanced compression (smart H.265) enhanced WDR and secure...

Most Recent Industry Reports

Access Control Online Show - July 2020 - With 40+ Manufacturers - Register Now on Jul 01, 2020
IPVM is excited to announce our July 2020 Access Control Show. With 40+ companies presenting across 4 days, this is a unique opportunity to hear...
Hanwha Face Mask Detection Tested on Jul 01, 2020
Face mask detection or, more specifically lack-of-face-mask detection, is an expanding offering in the midst of coronavirus. Hanwha in partnership...
UK Government Says Fever Cameras "Unsuitable" on Jul 01, 2020
The UK government's medical device regulator, MHRA, told IPVM that fever-seeking thermal cameras are "unsuitable for this purpose" and recommends...
Camera Course Summer 2020 on Jun 30, 2020
This is the only independent surveillance camera course, based on in-depth product and technology testing. Lots of manufacturer training...
Worst Over But Integrators Still Dealing With Coronavirus Problems (June Statistics) on Jun 30, 2020
While numbers of integrators very impacted by Coronavirus continue to drop, most are still moderately dealing with the pandemic's problems, June...
FLIR Screen-EST Screening Software Tested on Jun 30, 2020
In our FLIR A Series Test, the cameras' biggest drawback was their lack of face detection, requiring manual adjustment when screening each...
Dahua Buenos Aires Bus Screening Violates IEC Standards and Dahua's Own Instructions on Jun 30, 2020
Dahua has promoted Buenos Aires bus deployments as "solutions that facilitate community safety". However, they violate IEC standards and,...
UK Firm Markets False Fever Screening, Hikvision Disavows on Jun 30, 2020
A UK security firm falsely claimed its Hikvision-based thermal solution could be used for "accurately detecting fever in any person", even claiming...
Industry Study: 83% of US Temperature Screening Sellers Falsely Say Not Medical Devices on Jun 29, 2020
83% of US companies selling temperature screening devices, aka 'fever' detectors, claim they are not medical devices, contrary to FDA definition,...
Manufacturers on Virtual 'ISC West' 2020 and Potential ISC West 2021 on Jun 29, 2020
With the 2020 ISC West show now officially canceled, attention turns to Reed's new "ISC West 2020 Virtual Event" planned for October and for the...