Is It Legal to Ban Google Glass?

Author: Carlton Purvis, Published on Mar 28, 2014

No longer are facility based surveillance cameras alone watching you. 

Now you must contend with people wearing personal ones.

San Francisco bars and restaurants are starting to ban patrons from wearing Google Glass inside their establishments, some citing privacy concerns. And one resident is compiling a list of the places than ban audio and video recordings, what he calls Glasshole-Free establishments. Here’s the incident credited with starting the bans:

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Comments (10)

It's like surveillance camera man but not a joke this time:

Wearable cameras are going to become an increasingly practical problem the easier, less expensive and more commonplace they become. Just like people have an expectation that they are not going to be watched going to the bathroom, they do not accept someone filming them up close like that.

For obvious reasons, the casino industry has been talking about this for a while now. Most have either banned them outright or are considering banning them.

How many of the bars that are banning GoogleGlass have CCTV systems?

Probably a lot of them have CCTV systems.

On the other hand, how often does CCTV video from bars go up on the Internet? Very rarely, not a real concern.

Compare to the risk of a random person deciding to upload it immediately to YouTube.

There is a big difference between a patron recording whatever they want and the owner of the establishment. The owner of the bar has the right to record what he wants for his own purposes. The general public can do so in their own home if they like too. I don't see an issue with people wearing them in public though.

As far as in the bathroom, there are already laws against that type of recording. No need for new laws when existing ones already apply.

This isn't just about Google Glass. The tsunami of wearable imaging that's about to flood the streets over the next five years is insane. And in many cases you'd never be able to tell at a dark bar that they're wearing full 1080p HD recording glasses. They'll just look like another hipster wearing clear lenses if it's dark or wearing their sunglasses when it's light out.

Pivothead's are the perfect example of that. THey're exploding right now and they're just the beginning. I know of at least three other manufacturer's in Asia tooling up production lines to start mass-producing very similar type devices and all of them will be under $300. Some under $150.

It's coming whether people like it or not. Laws and society will just have to adjust. You can ban Google glass as much as you want. But within the next five years everyone will be able to record HD video and audio and you'll never know where their camera is.

I see an opportunity for someone to invent a device that can detect surreptitious recorders. I'm sure casinos would line up to buy them.

Let 'em start a line.... :)

I wish Bill Gates would steal my ideas...

I believe that it comes down to the variances in what we consider "privacy".

In another post, I mention that I believe that privacy is not binary, it is a continuum.

If people say that, for example, in jail, you have no expectation of privacy, and the video gets released to YouTube, then it can be inferred that in ____, you have no expectation of privacy, so put the video on YouTube.

Therefore, why not put all of the video surveillance from your local bar on the web? Why not allow Google Glass everywhere?

Do you have an expectation of privacy in a nightclub? Do you have an expectation of privay in the parking lot of said nightclub? What about in the champaign room?

If it CAN be put on YouTube, assume that it will.

Privacy is not binary, it is a continuum. Privacy means privacy from whom.

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