How To Mount A Dome On A Sloped Surface?

Need to mount some domes on a sloped soffit and need an idea where to buy, or how to make, a wedge block to mount the camera parallel with the ground.


Or use Turret (eyeball) cameras and no wedge needed.

I'm not sure how that's going to fix the issue? Can a turret aim above parallel to the ground?

Oh, that angle. A picture is worth a dozen posts. I have that at my house and I wall mounted turrets under the eaves.

Imagine the camera needs to be mounted where the arrow for the vent strip is. There is a downspout and a wall mounted light fixture that precludes us from mounting on the wall. We have to place it on the soffit.

I would think that the 3-degrees of freedom from the gimbal would allow the focal plane to be parallel to the ground while the base would still be flush.

But obviously you are saying that's not the case, or am I misunderstanding?

Maybe something like this? Ball Mount Swivel Bracket

Did a job like this recently, just used the hikvision turrets ds2cd2332/(5). They have 3 axis mounting and I was able to see an ideal wide view at 2.8mm. However I did get some blinds pots outward maybe 15/20 feet away but my PTZ is picking that up. It doesn't look bad either cause the camera gives the (attached directly to the house) kind of look. Get the 2332 models if you need technical support and plan on updating or the 2335 models if you don't mind Chinese lettering and don't plan on needing tech support or updating the camera.

Did a job like this recently, just used the hikvision turrets ds2cd2332/(5). They have 3 axis mounting and I was able to see an ideal wide view at 2.8mm. However I did get some blinds pots outward maybe 15/20 feet away but my PTZ is picking that up. It doesn't look bad either cause the camera gives the (attached directly to the house) kind of look. Get the 2332 models if you need technical support and plan on updating or the 2335 models if you don't mind Chinese lettering and don't plan on needing tech support or updating the camera.

Did a job like this recently, just used the hikvision turrets ds2cd2332/(5). They have 3 axis mounting and I was able to see an ideal wide view at 2.8mm. However I did get some blinds pots outward maybe 15/20 feet away but my PTZ is picking that up. It doesn't look bad either cause the camera gives the (attached directly to the house) kind of look. Get the 2332 models if you need technical support and plan on updating or the 2335 models if you don't mind Chinese lettering and don't plan on needing tech support or updating the camera.

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I live in the NW and near a mill that rough cuts several types of lumber.

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If you need a piece let me know what type you need and provide an address and I will send it to You.

Forrest Magers

Are the domes purchased already?

What type of gimbal do they have?

They have not been purchased, but we were trying to use the Dahua IPC-HDBW4421E-AS which is a three axis dome. The issue is that the soffit slopes upwards towards the house, meaning that we can get a really good shot of the ground under the eaves, but the camera base needs to be mounted parallel to the ground.

I noticed that Hikvision has angled bases for their domes. I've never used one though.

Disclaimer: I think like a trunkslammer sometimes.

What about a swing bracket? ie:

They sell them at big box home improvement stores to hang garden hose reels or pneumatic tool hoses from.

They would make up the angle of the soffit and give you a parallel with-the-ground mounting surface.

Heck, you might be able to just bend up a stamped sheet metal bracket used in roofing.

Ethan says:

This third axis allows for corrections if the camera is not mounted level with the horizon. Most commonly this is used to adjust domes mounted to sloped ceilings for proper angle.

Dome Camera Install Guide

He's trying to mount a dome under the eave looking out, i.e., perpendicular to the roofline. Not down the length of the eave. It's not a matter of leveling, it's a matter of the camera simply not being able to angle that far.

Yes, you are correct Ethan. My only solution I could come up with is to take a 6"x6" and chop off a small block at the matching angle to create a wedge. Issue there is that I can't seem to find a 6"x6" that isn't pressure treated so it can be painted to match his soffit.

Thanks, that makes sense. Obviously my sarcasm detection let me down when reading:

...we can get a really good shot of the ground below the eaves...

While I'm on a roll, let me ask would the corner mount bracket for that camera work if you were just to flange one side down to be the same angle, only negative, of the other one?

I'm not sure I like the idea of the open void that will expose the wire using a corner bracket, but thanks for pointing that out. I just wish the downspout and light fixture weren't occupying the entire wall next to the garage door.

For what you're describing I'd probably just knock a few brackets together out of Azek. Easy to work with, won't rot, you can get exactly what you need pretty cheap.

I assume the underside of the eave is covered?

how about a simple wooden "L" long enough to protect the wire.
perhaps the eave covering is available in 3/4" stock. Glued & screwed. painted to match if necessary. End-Caps are optional.

simpleton

Get one of the wall mount brackets, affix to eave, mount camera on bracket and point.

Thinking out loud, what about using one of the Dahua wall mounts and just having the camera at an angle?

PFB200W

PFB203W

PFB200W

Chase, that is the best solution so far. I just hope the client can live with the aesthetics.

That's what I was trying to get at with my reply, you just included drawings :)

Dupe post

Jon, how far out does the camera need to see, 50, 100 ft, more?

50' should suffice. Maybe as little as 35'.

What about a sloped camera? Dahua also has a 4MP wedge.

Not sure if it can compensate enough for the down tilt, maybe with the right lens? Aesthetically, it would be pretty clean, I'd think.

That dome style does nothing to solve this issue alone. In fact, that style of some usually has a fixed lens, and has less range of motion for aiming the camera. But, all of that is ignoring the fact that the camera needs to see above itself.

To make this easier to imagine, forget that the soffit is sloped. Imagine its parallel to the ground. The soffit is a mere 7' off the ground, where the camera is to be mounted. My client wants to observe an object 35' away from the camera at a height of 15'.