Do Cameras Usually Die Before Their IR Does?

I have two bullet cameras that are 2-3 years old and where the built-in IR has stopped working, (even after cleaning). Entire ring of LED's is out. Cheap-assed cameras, but still work fine except for that. Seemed a litte weird at first, but something's got to go first on any box, right?

Put another way, when you have to return/repair/replace a camera with built-in IR, how often is non-functioning IR the reason?

btw, I was pretty sure there was an IPVM article or survey on "Why do cameras fail ", (in the hardware sense.) but I can't locate it. If not, maybe it would be a good added integrator survery question in the future?


Integrated IR is a relatively new phenomenon, even up until 3 years ago, they were not very common, certainly on the professional side. I mention this because this limits data / experiences on long term reliability.

That said, 'cheap-assed cameras' tend to use consumer grade LEDs (see IR LED types). To that end, I wouldn't be surprised for it to commonly happen after a few years.

On failure rate, we do have this: Lifespan of Video Surveillance Systems. We will queue one up specifically on camera failures.

That said, 'cheap-assed cameras' tend to use consumer grade LEDs (see IR LED types). To that end, I wouldn't be surprised for it to commonly happen after a few years.

If the LEDs do typically fail after warranty but before the camera itself, it's weird because you still have a perfectly good camera, just not as good. I'm gonna order a replacement ring and see if it works.

Raytec and others offering external illuminators will be sure to use these failures in their marketing. Maybe they could even offer a POE-splitting external illuminator that attaches to most bullets, and turn the whole thing to their advantage.

btw, I intended cheap-est not cheap-assed, damn auto learning, auto correct...

"Raytec and others offering external illuminators will be sure to use these failures in their marketing."

Sure, but it's still a price issue.

A relatively inexpensive, short-range Raytec IR illuminator (e.g., Raymax 25) runs in the $250 price range, which is what twice the price of what your camera cost with IR?

Garbage in, that is what you get,garbage Working for a manufacter that stands behind their cameras, I cannot believe some of the hardware we have to replace. How can an integrator with the least bit of integrity even sleep at night knowing they will have a failure sooner rather than later? It has been my experience over the years that substandard manufacturers do not last. Market place can be cruel.

I always look at this as a weak link in the camera when justifying my price for cameras vs other bids a client receives. The warranty of the camera seems to be related to the quality of the camera in my view.

I can not see this but my wife swears that Christmas bulbs get dimmer each year and the cheaper the quicker they seem to dim. I use this as an analogy and the clients seem to relate to it.

I also look at built in IR as a tool but not a solution to better lighting and independent IR illuminators. Just when I started to get a handle on basic imaging concepts and transmission, I find that really understanding lighting is maybe even more intensive.

Good subject for a training topic.

Ted

Color video is actually painting with light. I am in the south and we are fortunate to have low cost power.

Have a healthy respect for ir illumination. Unless stated otherwise good for only 60 feet. We have had good results with cmos day/night units.

I've had some cheap cameras (generic, Vonnic, etc) that the IR has failed after about a year in service. It is somewhat common with cheaper models IMO.

Did you fix 'em, scrap 'em, move 'em or leave 'em?