Device to IP Control Anything - uSwitch Relay

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Jan 13, 2014

A common challenge integrators face is controlling non-networked equipment. Once systems 'go IP', there is typically a desire to stick everything on the network too. Unfortunately, even turning equipment on or off can be a chore requiring manual operation or clunky expensive machine controllers. The uSwitch Relay aims to change all that for less than $150. In this note, we look at the relay, potential security applications, and explore the limits of its usefulness.

[premium_content]

Potential ************

*** ***** ** ******* ** ******* ** *** ******* ** ** ********* to. *** ******'* ******** ******* ***** ** *** ******* ****:

*** *******: **** ** ***** ** *********** *********** ******* ** *********, *** ******* *** ** ********* ** *** ***** ********* ** ******** ** allow ******** ********** *******. **** *******, **** * ******** **** ********. The ***** *** ** ********* ** **** *** ******** ****** open ** ****** ** ****** ** *** ********** *** ********** remotely ********* ** ***. 

** *** **** ***, **** ******* ******** ***** ********, ** even ********* **** ******** ***** *** ** ****** ** ******** as ******. ***** ************ ** ****** ******* ******* *** ** used ** ****** **********, *** ********* *** **** *** *** access ** ******** *** ******** ******* **** * ***** ********.

****** *********: ******* *** ** *** ***** ***** **** ***** ******* ******** equipment. ** * ********, ****** ** ****** ******* ************ *** ******* ******* the ***** *************** **** (***** ******* *** *********) **** *** internet.

Product ********

**** **** ********* **** ************ *** ****** ******* ************ ***** installed ** '**** **' *******, ****** ********* *** ************* ***** **** ********** **** ***** ** **** ********* *** non-networked *******.**********'* ******* ** ** ** ********** ***** **** ***** * ****** ******* control ********* ** ***-********* *******. 

*** ~*" * *" * *.*" ****** ***** ** ***** enclosed *** *********** ******** *** ****** **** ******* ***** ** to ******/***:

***** ******* *******:

  • ****** ******* *********: ***** *** ****** ******** * ********* ********** ** *** ***** ********, the ********* ** *******, ********** **** ** * ******* ** buttons *** *********.  **** ** *** ******* ** ****** *** be ********** *** **** ** ** ************. ******** *** ****** to *****, *** *****. * ********** ** ***** ** *** image *****:

 

  • ******** *****:**** ******* ******** ****** *******, *** ******* *** *** ******** timers (*****/*******/*******) **** ***** *** ********* ***** ** ************* ****** when *** ******** ** *******.
  • ******** *********:*** ***** ******* ********* ****** ** ********* ** ******** *** password.
  • **/** *** ******** *****:* ***** ********** ** **** *** ** *** ** ******. An ******** ****** ***** ****** ** ****** ** ** ** VDC **** ** **** *** ********* ******** *****
  • ***********:*** ******* ***  ****** ******* ** **** **** ~$***. **** ** a ****** ********* ******** ***** ***** ************ ********** *** ~$***, **** ****** ******* ******** ******* *** ******* software ** *******.

************

******* ******** ** ******* *** *********:

**** *****: ******* ***** ******** ********** ** ** '***** ********* ******', the ***** ******** ***** *****/****** ******** ****** ** * ******* fashion *********'* ******. *** **** ****** **** *** *** ****** ********* of ***** ********** **** **** *****, ** ********* ******* *** be ******** ******** **** ******* ***** ******* ******. *******, *** P8221's ******** *** **** ***** ** ***** (*** ****-******* **) and *** * ********** ****** ****** **** ** ~$***.

************ ******:** ***** ** ********* ***** ******* ****************, **** ***** ***** ** ** ********* ****** *** ****** in *** *******/******* ****** *****. *******, ***** ********* *** ********* more ******* ** ******* *** ***** **** ******* ******* ******** before ********. ** *********, ***** ***** ** ****** ***** * higher ****** ** ********** ******* *** ******** ***********, *** **** are **** **** ********* ******* ******* $*** - $*** ****.

Drawbacks & **********

***** ******* *** ******* ***** ***** ** ******** ******* ***** ** travel ** ****** *********, ** **** *** **** ******* *********, namely:

  • *** ********* ****:*** *****'************ ***** *** ** *** ********** **** *** *********. **** means **** *********** *** ****** ** ** ********* ** ***** place ** * ********** *******, ********* ******** *********** *** *** have ******* ********* **********.
  • *****:*** ***** ** ******** *********, *** ** ********** **** *** LAN **** ****** ********** ************* ** ********, *******, ** **** forwarding ** ****.
  • ********* *******:**** ******** ******** ********** *** *** ********, *******, *** ******** ** ****** *** ***-******* ********** *******. Using *** ******* ***** **** ************** ** *********** ** ********** Engineer *** ****, ****** ***********.
  • **/*** ****:***** ******* ** ******, ********* ******** ***** ** ****** ** away.  **** ***** ************* ****** **** *** ***** ******* ** *******, *** ** not * ********** *********** *** ******** *********** ** **** ******* PLC ***** ************.

Comments (16)

Network attached relay devices have been widely available for some time-- is there something unique I am missing ?

Hello Josh:

Which makes/models are you most familiar with?

As a whole, there is not much distinction among any type of addressable relay, aside from price and difficulty in configuring - both items that we point out in this update as 'pros'.

We have not tested the uSwitch, so if you have field experience with any particular type I am interested in hearing feedback.

Been using the CBW devices for several years with good succes.

Equivilent model ~$110 or POE version ~$135.

I haven't used that particular CBW device but the ones that I have used have quite a bit of functionality, scheduled events, emailing, counters and a BASIC script interpreter for anything else.

These types of devices are a very good tool to have and can make the seemingly impossible a reality.

BASIC language will never die! Must you know BASIC to program Control-By-Web devices?

No you do not need to know BASIC to program CBW devices.

BASIC scripting is a feature within the web GUI to give more flexibility to the units. It is a very basic (no pun intended) interpreter and doesn't support many of the standard commands but I have used it successfully when I needed more functuinality.

I'm using control by web as well. Very happy with them and you can add temperature, humidity and other types of sensors. Very powerful product and cost effective.

CBW is good. Their mobile app is very useful and gives you full control of all the devices.

DLI is another great option.

Plus they have GREAT commercial!

That commercial should win an award for the most sexist, ethnic, geographic stereotypes and sexual double entendres in a 2-minute ad, with an honorable mention for best cleavage by a police impersonator.

We have used the Axis P8221, to connect door sensors and fire alarm panels to the VMS, receive on screen alerts and pop up the relevant camera”s”, works great.

Connecting more devices to the network is good, but the challenge is when the client ends up with multiple independent applications controlling different devices.

If you are a little “technical” and want a superior interface with more bells and whistles, check out the BeagleBone Black.

Mike,

How would you compare BeagleBoard against Arduino ?

BeagleBoard is new and has fewer resources. Arduino has ton’s of online resources and projects. Arduino has an interface and is better for the “weekend warrior” vs. Beagle being more language intensive. This wouldn’t be a huge deal if there were more online resources and projects to work from.

I suppose it comes down to the project that you are trying to build as well.

There are plenty of YouTube videos out there comparing the two.

I bought a BeagleBone to build a temp-controller / monitor for my Green Egg. I eventually gave up on the BeagleBone and went to the Arduino because there are several projects in full production. So for me, it came down to the limited resources and my limited unix knowledge.

However, the BeagleBone comes with a faster processor and has the built in ethernet capabilities. It can also communicate with far more interfaces / protocols. I had to buy the ethernet cape for the Arduino.

thanks , very enlightening

Is this the Green Egg you mention? I seriously bow down to you. Building an arduino temp monitor for a smoker would win you first place at the Radio Shack Grill Fest.

We integrate some i/o interfaces with modbus and OPC protocols.

I/O devices with modbus were like the Lantronix IntelliBox-I/O 2100.

In the other hand, OPC is wide use in the automation industry.

Moxa Makes an excellent line of industrial I/O boxes, that are compatible with common VMS' And we use them when integration or control of other devices/sensors are required.

But this is an interesting offering with an inexpensive price.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports on Power

Installing Box Cameras Indoors Tutorial on May 22, 2018
This tutorial starts our physical installation for video surveillance series, starting with Box Cameras, one of the oldest and most basic types....
Vivotek 12MP Fisheye Camera Tested (FE9391-EV) on May 08, 2018
Next in our 12MP fisheye camera evaluation, we bought and tested Vivotek's latest generation FE9391-EV, a new model claiming improved smart IR...
IP Network Hardware for Surveillance Guide on May 02, 2018
Video surveillance systems depend on IP networking equipment. In this guide, we explain the key pieces of equipment and features, explaining where...
Alarm.com Business Market Expansion on Apr 13, 2018
Alarm.com has millions of subscribers, but the company has traditionally been mostly a residential/home focused offering.  ADC's new Smart Business...
Axis Launches Mini Concealed IR PTZ on Apr 11, 2018
Axis has been a laggard in releasing IR PTZs. While the company released a laser focus PTZ (the Q6155-E tested) until now Axis has had no PTZs with...
ISC West 2018 Access Control Rundown on Apr 06, 2018
For ISC West 2018, what is new and interesting in access control?  This rundown will bring you up to speed on the exhibitors, what they are...
Owl Car Cam Tested - Disappoints on Mar 30, 2018
With $18 million in VC funding, and led by the former product lead for the iPod and the VP of Engineering of Dropcam, Andrew Hodge, hopes are high...
Wireless Networking For Video Surveillance Guide on Mar 29, 2018
Wireless networking is a niche in video surveillance applications, but it can be a difficult one to understand with proper wireless design,...
Network Racks For Surveillance Guide on Mar 21, 2018
In this guide, we look at network rack infrastructure, one of the fundamentals of IP video surveillance. Inside, we cover: What is a rack unit...
Rack Mounting NVRs Tutorial on Mar 14, 2018
Rack mounting recorders is common in professional systems, but manufacturers are making it difficult, with simple design failures causing multiple...

Most Recent Industry Reports

VMS Server Sizing on May 25, 2018
Specifying the right sized PC/server for VMS software is one of the most important yet difficult decisions in IP video surveillance. In the past...
China: Foreign Video Surveillance Is Security Risk on May 25, 2018
The Chinese government has long acknowledged that foreign video surveillance is a 'risk to national security' and has increasingly and almost...
US House Passes Bill Banning Gov Use of Dahua and Hikvision on May 24, 2018
Today, the US House of Representatives passed H.R. 5515, a bill that includes a ban on the US government's use of Dahua and Hikvision. This follows...
Hanwha Wisenet X Analytics and VMD Test on May 24, 2018
Continuing our updated testing of camera analytics, we tested Hanwha's Wisenet X analytics for over two weeks in multiple scenes, indoors and out,...
Ambitious Mobile Access Startup: Openpath on May 24, 2018
This team sold their last startup for hundreds of millions of dollars, now they have started Openpath to become a rare access control small...
Amazon's "Dangerous New Face Recognition Technology" Says ACLU on May 23, 2018
The ACLU has caused a stir, with a new report Amazon Teams Up With Law Enforcement to Deploy Dangerous New Face Recognition Technology,...
Software Only VMS vs NVR Appliances on May 23, 2018
Should you buy your own PC/server and load VMS software on it or get a turnkey appliance (both hardware and software, e.g., NVR, Hybrid DVR) from a...
Buy Arecont: Top Bid $10 Million Cash on May 22, 2018
Last year, Arecont had a deal for a purchase price of $170 million (see Failed Arecont China Acquisition). This year, Arecont has a deal for a...
Installing Box Cameras Indoors Tutorial on May 22, 2018
This tutorial starts our physical installation for video surveillance series, starting with Box Cameras, one of the oldest and most basic types....
The Hikvision Smart Classroom Behavior Management System on May 22, 2018
Hikvision's rapidly growing offering of analytics, which we most recently examined with Hikvision's ethnic minority analytics, is now going into...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact