The End of CCDs

By: John Honovich, Published on Mar 17, 2015

'Everybody' knows that CCDs provide better image quality and low-light performance.

Alas, beware out of date knowledge. It has been many years since that has been true in surveillance yet many 'professionals' still tout this as 'fact'. CMOS has long since surpassed CCD for surveillance cameras.

'*********' ***** **** **** provide ****** ***** ******* and ***-***** ***********.

****,****** *** ** **** knowledge. ** *** **** many ***** ***** **** has **** **** ** surveillance *** **** '*************' still **** **** ** 'fact'. **** *** **** since ********* *** *** surveillance *******.

[***************]

***, ******* ******** **** **** *** sensor **************** **** ****** ** those ***** ************ **** the *** ** **** is ****.

Surveillance **** ** ***

** ********* **********, ~**% ** ************ cameras ***** *** **** sensors. ******, *** **** form ****** ***** **** are ***** ** ** common ** **** *** for ****.

***********, *** '****' '*****' low ***** ********** ******* today (******* **** ** by ***** **** '***********', 'Lightcapture', '*********', '***********', '*******' etc.) *** *** ****. Indeed, ****'* ****** ********** of ** **** *** CMOS ** ****.

** *** *****, **** was ******* '*****' **** CCD. **** *** ****. However, ** *** **** decade, ********* ******** ** CMOS ******* **** ******* them ** ******* ****** low-light ***********, **** ******* range *** ****** **********.

Axis **** *** ** ******

*** ***** *** (*******) think *** *** ***** better, *** *** **** supporting ******** ******, **** as ****' *** ** CMOS **** [**** ** longer *********], ***** ********:

"*** ******* **** **** used ** ******* *** more **** ** ***** and ******* **** ************ qualities; ***** ****, ****** light *********** **** **** sensors. **** ****** ***** sensitivity ********** **** ****** images ** *** ***** conditions."

**** ******* ** ** 5 ***** ** **** out ** ****. ******, all ** **** '*****' low ***** ******* ** the **** * ***** use ****, *** ***.

****** *** **** ** out ** **** ***********, but ********** **** *** many ***** ***.

Stop **** *** ****

** *** **** **** around *** ******** ******* and **** ** *********** about *** **** *** better, **** ****. *** might ***** *** *** showing **** ********* ***, in *******, *** *** confirming *** *** ** date *** ***.

*********, *** **** ******** will **** ******** **** has **** **** **** in ************ - **** has '***' **** ***.

Comments (20)

" Axis Says CCD is Better"

John,

I am not sure where this comes from but since the day the "Lightfinder" camera ( Q1602) was introduced the opposite was professed.

I cited the Axis webpage in the post. That's where it comes from. Again, Axis' CCD vs CMOS page.

I agree with you on the metapoint. I am sure Axis overall believes CMOS is better today.

My point is that there is still a lot of old information still publicly and prominently available, including on Axis' website, that says CCD is better.

Agreed that there is an enormous amount of outdated material out there!!!

Btw, I am sure there is outdated material on IPVM as well so I don't want to throw stones in a glass house.

We regularly look to update older posts (either to redo with new ones or mark old ones appropriately).

However, we surely have not caught everything.

Anyone sees outdated material on IPVM, please let us know.

Hi John, often when I am searching for information on IPVM, the date of the item is not at the top so I have to scroll to the bottom to find out if the item is current. If there are many comments following the item, then I have to scroll up and down until I can find the date of the item. It would be helpful if the date of the original item always appeared at the top if it's not too tricky to implement with legacy items.

I don't know if my comment relates to articles, tests, discussions or some of all of these categories. However here is a topical example given Dahua have just announced NVRs with H.265 support: H.265 / HEVC Codec Tutorial. The date appears after the article and before the comments.

Thanks, Luke, we've made the change to show the date up top for all posts. This is now live.

Fantastic! Thanks very much John. That's very helpful.

CCD's, heck everyone knows Silicon Intensified Target cameras (tube with intensifier) are the best at low light. One start light is all you needed, really..

;-)

If one is still into tubes - SIT is very good.

Remember there are other low light technologies that only the military and special customers can afford. (Export controlled and more)

ICCD (image intensifier CCD)

EB-CCD (electron bombardment CCD)

EM-CCD (electron mulitiplication CCD)

And the latest: Electron Bombarded Active Pixel Sensor which uses CMOS

a. it was a light hearted comment on my part but it is true they were avaialble to anyone (not just controled export) at about 15K per camera back in the day and had a huge integrated zoom lens. That did not include the HD (Heavy Duty not High Def) PTZ.

b. sorry, spell check error, one star light (a single star) not start light. My error.

c. considering it was late 60s early 70s you got very good but very expensive low light performance. Some of those cameras lasted 25 years in the field (when maintained properly).

What about CMOS vs MOS?

In overload, will get you data on Friday on semi-conductor technology

Does this effectively cede the security CCD market to Sharp's iSHartina line?

And you thought Effio was a weird name...

Slight backpedal by Sony?

Sony Industrial Cameras continue to use CCD sensor technology

Sony remains the global leader in camera technology and is committed to both pushing the boundries of existing technology with innovative new camera products and to maintaining their existing line-up. CCD sensors, which have driven Sony industrial cameras for many years, will feature in new products for 2015 including the Cubic GigE XCG-C range. Sony has no plans to discontinue any industrial camera products related to CCD sensor availability before March 2026 and will continue to support customers with long product lifetimes.

Curiously, many of the links to the original statement have been taken down, including the allied one at the top of this article. One website said the link was removed at the request of Sony.

So it appears that Sony is not going back to CCDs as much as they are lengthening the EOL date to help facilitate their customers doing the transition.

Here is how Basler, a Sony CCD customer, is describing it:

"Sony CCD sensors used in Basler cameras are now planned with a last time shipment date until end of March 2026. Basler will ensure smooth transitions from current Basler products using CCD sensors to Basler products with CMOS sensors. In that regard, Basler already offers a broad variety of CMOS sensor-based products that allow an easy transition even today. As Basler anticipated the CCD-to-CMOS trend very early, our current and future product portfolio provides secure and cost-effective replacement products with future-proof CMOS sensors. Shortly, we will also prepare a program to actively inform you about transition possibilities within our portfolio."

A round of applause is in order for three weary IP veterans:

D1 CCD MJPEG

Now get out of here already.

Smug and over-produced Basler video on the change from CCD to CMOS. Ironic, how like above, they claim to have "seen it coming" for a long time because they are on the forefront of camera technology, yet apparently were the ones that were caught off guard, and then panicked and got Sony to push out the EOL's to 2026.

Someone needs to tell Sharp.

They just released 14 new high sensitivity security CCD's. Most are bigger than 1/3". Also two new 8MP 1" sensors are listed as under development.

"They just released."

Do you see a date of release or announcement on that? I could not.

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