Security Integrator Hourly Rates 2013

Author: John Honovich, Published on Dec 18, 2013

The median security integrator hourly rate charged is $90 to $100 USD per hour with 90% of integrators charging between $75 and $125 USD per hour, uncovered in a unique IPVM integrator survey. In this note, we break down the key factors impacting pricing, share color commentary from integrators and explain how to best make use of these results.

[UPDATE: New version - Security Integrator Hourly Rates 2016]

*** ****** ******** ********** ****** **** ******* ** $** ** $100 *** *** **** **** **% ** *********** ******** ******* $75 *** $*** *** *** ****, ********* ** * ****** IPVM ********** ******. ** **** ****, ** ***** **** *** key ******* ********* *******, ***** ***** ********** **** *********** *** explain *** ** **** **** *** ** ***** *******.

[******: *** ******* -******** ********** ****** ***** ****]

[***************]

Key ******* ********* *****

*** **** ******* ***** ******* ****:

  • *** ****: ********** *** *********** ****** ** ** ****** *** ** the *** *** ** *** ***** (********* ****** ** $**) while ** *** ******* ******** **** ** *** **** *** of *** ***** (********* ****** ** $***). **** *** *** most ********** ****** ** ***** *********.
  • ********** ********: *******, **** *** ************ ****** **** *********** ********** *** US, ******, ********* *** ********* ******* ******. *** ********** **** larger ****** (*** *******, *** *** ********* *** **** *********** had **** ** *** ******* ******** *****, *** ********** *********** the **** ****** ***** ** **** ******).
  • ******* ******: *** *********** **** ************** ********** ********** *********** *** *** handful ** *********** *** ****** *********** ********* *** ***** *******.

Color **********

**** ** * ********* ** *********** *** ****** **** ******* in ***** *******:

  • $*** *** **** ******* ** ******* ***** $** *** **** junior ** ****** *****
  • $***.** *** ****. ***** *** ******* ** ***** *** ******* is $** ** $** **** ********** ******* ***** *** **** end.
  • $** *** *** ***. $** ** *** **** ***. $** average. ******* ** *** ******* **** ** *** **
  • $** *** ************. $*** *** ***********/*************.
  • $**/** *** *** **********, **** ********* ********
  • $** *** **** ** *** **** *******, $** **** ****** where **********.
  • $**.** *** **** ******* *****
  • $**.***/** *******. ******* @ $***/** ** @**.** */** ******* @**.***/** and ** @ **.**
  • *** ***** *** ******* *********, ********, ******, ****, ***** ** or ****** ********* (****, *****)*********** **** ***** *****, *******, ** $150 *** ****. *-** *******. ******* ******** *** *** ******.
  • ** *** ***** ** *** ********* ******* **** $** ** $150 *** ****. ** *** $*** *** **** ** *** service ****.
  • $***.** ** $***.** *** **** ******* *** ******** ***** ***** rates **.** ** **.** **** ***** **.** ** ***.** *********** Well ********* *********** ** *** **** *** ***.** ** ***.** per **** ******* ********** **** ***** *** **** ***.****,**.***.******** ***** areas ** ** *** ** **.** ** **.** *** **** for *****
  • $**~$**. *** ********** **** ** $**, *********** ** $**. *** install ***** *** *** **** ** *** ******* *****
  • ** **** ***** ** ******* ***** ** $***/**. **** ** are ******* * ******* *** * *** ******* *** ******* is ********* ****** $**/**
  • ************ *****: $**/** ******* ***** $***/**
  • *************** * **** **** *** *** *** ********** ******** (*.*. per *****), *** ***** ****** ******** ******* * *** * hours.
  • ******* $**.** ** **** *** **********; ****** **** $**.** *** install ***********; ******* ***** $**.** ** ****; ******* ******** $**.** an ****.
  • $**.**, ****** ** $**.** ** *** *** *** *** *** hour ***** ******, ******** ** **** ********** **********
  • * **** ******** ***** **** ****** *** *** ****** ***** work **** *** ***** **** (***). ** ****** ******** **** 85/hr *** **** **** *** *** *** ** ** ***/** for ******* **********. ** ***** ***** ** ***/**. ** **** charge ** ***** ** **** * *****, **** **** ***** to *** ***** ***** ** * ******* ****
  • ********* $** ****** *** ***** *** ********** ******** *** **** we *** ****** ** * ****** ***** - **** **** $85 (**********, ***** **** **) $** ****** ******/******** ** *** $115 ** ** *** ******* ********. ** **** **** **** also **** ***** **** ********* ******* ***** ***** ** ** at *** **** **** ** **** *********** *****.
  • ********** $** ************ *******/****** ******** $***
  • $*** ***** **** ******** ****** ***** *** $** **** **********
  • ******* ***** $**, ******* ******* $***
  • ******* ***** - $*** ******* ***** - $*** ******* **** - $*** ** ******* - $ *** ***** **** **** NZ
  • ****** ******* ***** ** ********* **** **** *$** (***** *******) to *$***.** **** *** ******. ******* ********** ** ******** * percentage ** *** ******* **** ***** ******* ******* **% *** 25%

Price ******* ** **** ****

***** ******* *** *** *** **** *********** ****** ***** *********,****** **** **** *** ***** *********. ******** * ****** $** to $*** ******* ****, ******* ****** *** ******* ********** ******** ** ** **** */*** that ****** (*.*., **** $** ** $** *** ****, ~$**,*** USD ********) ** ********** ****. *** ********** ** ********** ** a *********** ********** ** ***** ***** ********* *** *** ***** billed ***, ******* / ***** ********, ***** / **** *** training, ********, **********, ***.

Using ***** *******

*** '*****' ** '****' ***** ** **** ****** ** *********. Even ***** ********* ** ********* ** ****, ********* *** ******* served, *********** ** ********** ***** *** ***** ** ********* *** in * ****** ** ********* ****:

  • ******* *******: *********** *** **** ** *** **** **** **** ** products, ***** ***** ***** **** ** ****** ********** ***** ****** fees.
  • ********** / *****: *********** ***** **** ** ***** *** ********** **** ***** result ** **** ****** **** ***** ** ********** * ****, delivering * ***** ******* ****, **** **** * ****** ****** rate.
  • ******* *****: ** *** ** **** ** ***** ******* *** **** hours *********** ***** ** * ***** ****. * ******* ******** a ***** ****** **** ***** **** ** ** ** ****** billing **** *****.

Comments (16)

The actual cost per hour for a technician runs between $65 to $80 per hour. This includes his time, training, inefficiency, vehicle (gas and insurance, depreciation, maintenance), etc.

That is why hourly rates need to be as high as possible to recoup the funds associated with a scare resource - - quality technical labor.

How many people base the hourly rate on the type of work done, not just the person doing it? For example, maybe a level 2 or 3 tech is the only one available to do some level 1 work. Are you going to charge the customer the level 2 or 3 rate just because the person is an advanced professional? Or only charge the rate based on the level of work done?

If one person goes out and spends an hour moving a dome (level 1) and then spends an hour setting up advanced analytics for crossed line with email and SMS alerts (level 2), would you charge the customer 1 hour for level one work and 1 hour for level 2 work, or the same rate for both hours?

I know what I would do, I would only charge the rate applicable to the work being done. (1 hour level 1 and 1 hour level 2 in the example above.) How is it fair charging the customer for work done at a pay rate almost half of what your paying a system specialist, and why would I spend the money sending two people (a level 1 person and a level 2 person) out to a jobsite if one is capable of getting all the work done in one shot, which is more efficient.

I'm curious if anyone had any other varying opinions.

BTW, great poll!

Good question, most often I see a rate based by person, rather than type of work. The main reason I have seen is that it is simpler to manage, avoiding debates or analysis on what the charge should be for each hour.

Indeed, as some of the respondents note above, the rate is often flat across the company or at least across a category, i.e., all service techs get charged out at $100, even if one service tech is far better than the others.

I doubt that people pay based on work done, rather than the total skill of the person doing it.

If a customer wants to complain that 1 hour was spent moving the dome, and 1 hour for configuration, and wants to pay the lower rate for 1 hour, then implement a miniumum - most places do.

So, if they want to pay a minimum 2 or 4 hours for a service call times two people, then ok.

Companies I worked for used to bill me out at $65-$75 an hour for installation work (depending on the difficulty of the work, the distances traveled, and how much demand I had on my time in general), and $45 an hour for troubleshooting, with a minimum of 8 to 10 hours, maximum of 20 hours. Of course, I haven't been an installer in 7 years.

I used to like troubleshooting. It's like doing a puzzle blindfolded. I like puzzles. But my goodness me, was it ever time consuming.

That's funny!

I stopped paying contractors hourly a long time ago (other then for really small service jobs), we do it all by the job now.

I had one idiot of a tech come out and deploy an Arecont system years ago. The customer called me and told me that one of the cameras never worked, I was out of the country and didn't have any employees at that time so I told the tech to go back and fix it. I told him to check the RJ45 crimps first and then troubleshoot from there. Well the idiot swore up and down that the RJ45 was done correctly and started to troubleshoot randomly. He called me 7.5 hours later and said the "camera is broken," I told him to redo the RJ45 crimps and reluctantly after 30 minutes of arguing he did it and 2 minutes later the camera was working. I told him I would pay the bill but he was never going to get another job from me and that he gets a bad name for his garbage inept service.

We should have a thread called dumbest tech moves.

Why not, I have the day off tomorrow.

Like the time a tech drilled a hole in the wall without looking to see what was on the other side, like an idiot, and when I went to the next room it turned out I'd drilled a hole right through the center of a painting. There was even a snake sticking out!

and it looked like this:

Undisclosed, thanks for the story!

I started a discussion on this.

I have been a tech in the security business for almost 30 years. As a field service tech I was not exposed to the Business side of the Business. After being laid off 9 months ago, I started my own Company in South Carolina (Now I get to wear all of the hats). I find the rates that are being listed here are above what I can charge by 30-60 percent. Most of the companies offering subcontract work will grumble if I add mileage to a job.

What am I missing here? Building a customer base is tough in this economy. When I bid work out, as a subcontractor, my rate is 50/hr. And yes, I do loose the work and bids if I ask for more.

Any suggestions from those of you that are more succesful than I am at Business?

Robert, my suspicion is that the cost of living is lower in your area (see cost of living index report) and that results in lower wages.

Also, it appears your rates are not to end users but to integrators who you are subcontracting for. To the extent you subcontract, expect the integrators to want to mark up your rates significantly so they can make a profit. p.s. - Subcontracting As A Career? is tough.

John: As I'm fairly new to IPVM, I'm just now seeing this poll. I don't imagine rates have changed much in the two years since the poll, but I haven't seen rates this low since I started in this field 25 years ago (I'm an end user), so I'm wondering whether there has been a poll/study on how much rates vary by region. I'm in Orange County (Calif), and a reputable integrator here will generally charge about $140/hr for basic labor give or take a few dollars. I did see the COLI document linked above, but COLI by State section doesn't seem to tie to the labor rates I'm seeing. Very curious. Thx!

That's because everyone in Orange County is a millionaire.... I kid :)

$140 for basic labor sounds high to me, and I am familiar with rates in Honolulu and NYC, and $140 is definitely far more than basic labor there, and those are extremely expensive locations as well.

I started a new discussion as I am sure there are people with experience in your area that can provided feedback: $140 Per Hour For Basic Labor In Orange County, CA - Really?

Millionaires - YES! But I'm still trying to figure out how that ship sailed without me. I'll take a look at the other discussion. I appreciate your starting it. Should be helpful.

David

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

Ex-Integrator Now Growth Strategist Interviewed on Apr 24, 2019
For more than a decade, Scot MacTaggart was a security integrator (at PA-based PSX). In late 2018, he left the industry. He is now a Growth...
Locking Down Network Connections Guide on Apr 23, 2019
Accidents and inside attacks are risks when network connections are not locked down. Security and video surveillance systems should be protected...
Arecont Favorability Results 2019 on Apr 22, 2019
Arecont's net negativity remained the same in IPVM's 2019 integrator study, though integrator's feeling became relatively more neutral compared to...
H.265 Usage Statistics on Apr 19, 2019
H.265 has been available in IP cameras for more than 5 years and, in the past few years, the number of manufacturers supporting this codec has...
Riser vs Plenum Cabling Explained on Apr 18, 2019
You could be spending twice as much for cable as you need. The difference between 'plenum' rated cable and 'riser' rated cable is subtle, but the...
Securadyne CEO: IPVM 'Entertaining For An Ignorant Few' on Apr 16, 2019
Securadyne's CEO Carey Boethel is unhappy with IPVM's report - Failed Integrator Rollup, Securadyne Sells to Guard Giant Allied. Indeed, he...
Strong ISC West 2019 For Manufacturers But Concerns For 2020 March Move on Apr 16, 2019
ISC West 2019 was strong for manufacturers, according to new IPVM survey results of 100+ manufacturers, consistent with 2018 results. However,...
Alarm.com Favorability Results 2019 on Apr 15, 2019
The once dot com startup has evolved to become a core provider for home security and is now expanding into commercial. In their first entry in...
Pole Mount Camera Installation Guide on Apr 11, 2019
Poles are a popular but challenging choice for deploying surveillance cameras outdoors. Poles are indispensable for putting cameras at the right...
UK Installer CCTV Aware - Flat Pricing, No Salespeople on Apr 10, 2019
This is a different kind of company. They do flat pricing, they do not have any salespeople and 50% of their sales are sold and booked...

Most Recent Industry Reports

Ex-Integrator Now Growth Strategist Interviewed on Apr 24, 2019
For more than a decade, Scot MacTaggart was a security integrator (at PA-based PSX). In late 2018, he left the industry. He is now a Growth...
19 Facial Recognition Providers Profiled on Apr 23, 2019
IPVM interviewed 19 facial recognition providers at ISC West to understand their claimed accuracy, success and positioning. 9 from China, where...
Locking Down Network Connections Guide on Apr 23, 2019
Accidents and inside attacks are risks when network connections are not locked down. Security and video surveillance systems should be protected...
Hikvision Admits USA Sales Falling on Apr 22, 2019
Hikvision, in a new Chinese financial filing, has admitted that its USA sales are now falling. Less than a year after the US government passed a...
Speco Ultra Intensifier Tested on Apr 22, 2019
While ISC West 2019 named Speco's Ultra Intensifier the best new "Video Surveillance Cameras IP", IPVM testing shows the camera suffers from...
Arecont Favorability Results 2019 on Apr 22, 2019
Arecont's net negativity remained the same in IPVM's 2019 integrator study, though integrator's feeling became relatively more neutral compared to...
H.265 Usage Statistics on Apr 19, 2019
H.265 has been available in IP cameras for more than 5 years and, in the past few years, the number of manufacturers supporting this codec has...
ACRE Acquires RS2, Explains Acquisition Strategy on Apr 19, 2019
ACRE continues to buy, now acquiring RS2, just 5 months after buying Open Options. One is a small access control manufacturer from Texas, the...
Access Control Course Spring 2019 - Last Chance on Apr 19, 2019
 Register for the Spring 2019 Access Control Course----Closed IPVM offers the most comprehensive access control course in the industry. Unlike...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact