HD Camera / Face Rec / Door Controller All-in-One

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Apr 30, 2014

Is it a security camera, face recognition reader, or a door controller?

Stand aside people: BioCam 300 claims to be all three, and more.

Should you consider this device for your systems? What are the downsides?

We take a look at the key features, pricing and competitive positioning inside.

** ** * ******** ******,*************** ******, ** * **** **********?

***** ***** ******: ****** *** ****** ** ** *** *****, and ****.

****** *** ******** **** ****** *** **** *******? **** *** the *********?

** **** * **** ** *** *** ********, ******* *** competitive *********** ******.

[***************]

********

*************** ** ** "*** *****'* ***** ** ** ****** **** ******** facial *********** *** ******* ** * ****** ****" *** ** not ****, ********* *** *** **** ****** ******. *** ~*"**"**" unit *********** ** * *****-****** ******-***** ******, **** ***** ** *** ears, *** * *" *** ******* ******* **********: 

*** ************* ****** ****** ** ***** ************ ******, * ****-*** ****** ******, * ****** **** monitor, *** * ********** **** ********** ** * ****** ****. When *** ***** **** ** ***** ******, *** ****** ******** surveillance ****** ** *** ***** 

*** ********

  • **** ******: *** **** ** ******** ** ** ******* **** ***** so ** *** ******* ******** ** *****, *** **** ******* those ***** ******* *** ******** ** '****** ********' ***********. ** to *** ***** *** ** ****** ** *** **** (** templates *** ****), ***** ** ****** ** ***** *** ******** in **** **** * *******. *** **** ****** ** *** scan ** ** ** **** ****, *** *** ******** ** LEDs ********* ******** **** ** **** *********.
  • ** ************ ******: *** **** **** ******** * **** ****, ** ***, day/night ****** **** ******** *****. *** **** *** ** ********** to ****** ** ****** ******* ** *** ******, ******** ********/******, ***** *** **********, *** **** *.***.
  • **** **********: ******, *** **** *********** ******** ** *** ****, *** has************ ***** *** ***** *******, *******, ** *** *******. ********* is ******** ** **** ** * '**********' ****** ******, *** while **** ********* *** *********** *** ** ****** **********, *** unit ****** ** ********** **** ****** *** ***** ****** *********.
  • *** ***: ***********, **** *** *** ******* ******** ** *** ****, it **** *** *** ***** **** ********, *** ******* ******** a ***** @ *.** ***** ******.

****

***** *** ****** *** ** ***, ** ** ******** ** have * ~$*,*** ****** *****. *** ********************** ******** *** ****** ** *** *********, *** *** ******* may ********** ** ********* ***** ********* *****, *** ********************.

*** * **** **** **********, ***** *** ****** *******, *** price ** ********** ********** ****** ***** *** **** ** ***********, one ** ****** ** **** ** * ***** ***** **** entry ******. ** *** ******** / *********** ****, ******* ** '***' - * **** *********** / ******** *******.

***************

***** *** **** ** ******** ** ****** ***** ****, ** does *** **** *** ****** **** ** *** *** ***. Absent ** ****** ******* *** ************ ** *******, ********* ****** should ** **** ** ***** ******:

  • *****:******* *** *********, *** *** ************ ******** ***** *************** ******* ***** *** ****** ******* * ** '********* **************'. ***** *** **** with ***** ******, *** ****** ******** ***** *** ********* ** a ************ ****** **** *******.
  • **** *** ********:*****, ******* ******* *** **** *** **************************** *** *****, ****** ****** ** **** ***** ** *******. While ******* ************* **** *********** ****** ** *** ***** ** less, ***** ** ** ********** ** *** ******** ***** ******** are **** **** * *** *****.
  • ******* ***********:***** ********* ** ***** **** * ****, **** ******** ******** and ***** ****, ** ** ******* ******* *****, ***** *********, nor ****** ***** *****. ***** **** ****, ************** ** ********** components ** *** ********, *** ** *** **** **** ***, the ****** ****** **** ** ********.

Unit *********** / *********** ********

*******, ** ****** *** ************* ** ********** ** *** *******, one ******* ******** ** *** **** ************** ** *** ********* to *******: ******** ********. 

*** *******'***************** *** ******** ********** *****:

*** ****** **** ** ******* *** ****** **** ** ******** good ****** ** *****, *** **** *** ***** ** ********** to ********* ** *****. ***** ************* **********, **** *** ******** of *** *** ** ***** ******* *********** **** ****** ** hats *** ********************* **** **********. ******* ******** ******** ** *** ********* **** ** *** **** leaves **** ****** ********** ** ******* *********, ******* **** ********.

*** **** ** ***** ** ********'* ********* ********* *****? ****, *** ********* ******* ** ******* ****** ***** ******* ***** *********** lead ** **** ******. ******** * ***** ** ******** ** a *** *** *** ** ****, *** ** ******* ********* to ***** **** **** ** ******** **** *** ****** ** front ** *** ***** ***** **.

Comments (10)

If the system is running in a verification mode (1:1) as it should for access control applications, then the number of faces in the database will have no bearing on matching accuracy and false alarm rates.

... the number of faces in the database will have no bearing on matching accuracy and false alarm rates.

So are you saying if it doesn't work with ~400 faces don't expect it to work any better with ~40? That's too bad because the latter is probably closer to the SOHO sweetspot...

I may have expressed myself poorly. While running in verification mode the number of users enrolled in the database will have no bearing on 1:1 verification matching performance, because the user presumably asserts his/her identity and the live image(s) is compared to the database image(s) corresponding to that user only. The number of images captured during runtime and enrollment for each user will likely have a bearing on matching accuracy. However, the technical matching performance for each user may either improve or degrade with the nature and number of images used depending on how the system makes use of them.

Skip - I'm not sure I totally follow your post. Are you saying that facial ID should be used as a sort of secondary verification mechanism, instead of being the primary/only verification mechanism?

With regards to FR accuracy: The product does have provision for wiegand inputs, so it could run in a two factor verification mode: User asserts identity with a possession factor (e.g., card) and FR camera verifies identity with biometrics (1:1 match). The accuracy of this mode will be much higher than identification mode (1:Many). In ID mode, the user looks at the camera, and his/her face is compared to every other image in the database (up to 400 users @ several images / user). Achieving good technical performance in this mode requires much stronger biometric performance as the probability for false match is much higher.

What I don't get about the recent burst of face-recognition access control products is where the real application is.

It seems like there are two primary cases:

1) Face-as-credential. This one still seems way to prone to false reads and delays, negating the ease-of-use factor when users get locked out or spend 10+ seconds at the door trying to get through.

2) Face-as-secondary credential. This one seems more practical because you're comparing the face read at the door to a known set of profile images, but it's still generally more costly and time consuming that something like an iris scan or fingerprint scan. The hardware is also bulky and ugly (for a door ornament) relative to other options.

I can't help but feel like facial recognition access control and 3D printers have a lot in common as that "gee whiz" thing that just can't really find a feasible fit in the marketplace just yet. This limits it to novelty and niche applications, which slows down overall adoption and R&D.

Are you seeing facial recognition applications that are truly viable and practical for a mainstream deployment?

Shouldn't the door controller be on the secure side of the door?

What if I take a full sized picture of an authorized person and hold it up in front of my face? At least it would be cleaner than chopping their head off!

Ken - I actually tried that, didn't work. I am guessing the facial geometry stored as the credential doesn't work when you have a flat 2D image.

What if the spoofed face was 3d?

Shades of Brian's Frankenfinger...;)

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

FST Fails on Jul 17, 2018
FST was one of the hottest startups of the decade, selected as the best new product at ISC West 2011 and backed with tens of millions in...
Belgium Bans Private Facial Surveillance on Jul 06, 2018
Belgium has effectively banned the use of facial recognition and other biometrics-based video analytics in surveillance cameras for private,...
GDPR For Access Control Guide on Jul 03, 2018
Electronic access control is common in businesses plus organizations are increasingly considering biometrics for access control. With GDPR coming...
Allegion Acquires Isonas on Jun 29, 2018
Isonas failed to 'revolutionize' access control as they regularly claimed. Now, nearly 20 years after their founding, they are being acquired by...
Replacing / Switching Access Control Systems Guide on Jun 28, 2018
Ripping out and replacing access control systems is hard for important reasons. Because users typically hold on to access control systems for as...
Free Online NFPA, IBC, and ADA Codes and Standards on Jun 27, 2018
Finding applicable codes for security work can be a costly task, with printed books and pdf downloads costing hundreds or thousands. However, a...
OpenEye Apex VMS Tested on Jun 26, 2018
OpenEye is a US company, founded nearly 20 years ago. In the past few years, OpenEye has been one of a few VMS providers that have pivoted to being...
'Secure Channel' OSDP Access Control Examined on Jun 21, 2018
Despite claiming to be better than Wiegand, OSDP's initial releases did not address the lack of encryption between reader and controller, leaving...
IFSEC 2018 Final Show Report on Jun 20, 2018
IPVM attended the IFSEC show for the first time this year. The Chinese took over the show, centered on Hikvision, flanked by Dahua, Huawei and a...
Axis Releases First New Access Controller In 5 Years (A1601) on Jun 15, 2018
It has been 5 years since Axis 2013 entry in the physical access control market, with the A1001 (IPVM test). Now, Axis has released its second...

Most Recent Industry Reports

Directory of Video Surveillance Startups on Jul 18, 2018
This directory provides a list of video surveillance startups to help you see and research what companies are new or not yet broadly known entity...
Ladder Lockdown and Ladder Levelizer Tested on Jul 18, 2018
Ladders are a daily necessity for surveillance and security installers, but working on an unstable surface can be extremely dangerous. In addition...
FST Fails on Jul 17, 2018
FST was one of the hottest startups of the decade, selected as the best new product at ISC West 2011 and backed with tens of millions in...
Axis ~$100 Camera Tested on Jul 17, 2018
Axis has released their lowest cost camera ever, the Companion Eye Mini L, setting their sights on a market dominated by Hikvision and Dahua. Can...
Amazon Ring Alarm System Tested on Jul 16, 2018
Amazon Ring is going to hurt traditional dealers, and especially ADT, new IPVM test results of Ring's Alarm system underscore. IPVM found that...
Hikvision Wins Chinese Government Forced Facial Recognition Project Across 967 Mosques on Jul 16, 2018
Hikvision has won a Chinese government tender which requires that facial recognition cameras be set up at the entrance of every single mosque...
Installing Dome Cameras Indoors Guide on Jul 16, 2018
IPVM is producing the definitive series on installing surveillance cameras. This entry covers one of the most common scenarios - installing dome...
Security Sales Course Summer 2018 on Jul 13, 2018
Based on member's interest, IPVM is offering a security sales course this summer. Register Now - IPVM Security Sales Course Summer 2018 This...
US Tariffs Hit China Video Surveillance on Jul 13, 2018
Chinese video surveillance products avoided tariffs for the first two rounds. Now, in the third round, many video surveillance products will be...
Last Chance - July 2018 IP Networking Course on Jul 12, 2018
Registration ends today, Thursday. Register now. This is the only networking course designed specifically for video surveillance...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact