Network Connectors for IP Cameras Guide

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Nov 05, 2015

Fewer installation tasks are as nuanced as terminating cables and attaching connectors. Fortunately, this task is easy to manage and get right if the proper components and tools are understood.

In this note, we explain:

  • Connector Type vs Cable Type
  • Single Piece vs Three Piece vs Connector Glands
  • Tools Needed
  • Cable Testing
  • Termination Labor

***** ************ ***** *** ** ******* ** *********** ****** *** attaching **********. ***********, **** **** ** **** ** ****** *** get ***** ** *** ****** ********** *** ***** *** **********.

** **** ****, ** *******:

  • ********* **** ** ***** ****
  • ****** ***** ** ***** ***** ** ********* ******
  • ***** ******
  • ***** *******
  • *********** *****

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Wire **** ******* ********* ****

********** ********** ******* ** ******* ****** ** *** *** ** the *********. *** ** *******, **** ********** ** **** **** RJ45 (********* ****** ****) ************. ********** ** *** **** ** the *** ***** **** ** *** *******, **** ********* **** configure **** ** *** ********* ***** *** ******* ***** *** use ** ******** ******** *****.

******* ** **** **** ***********, *** **** ** ********* **** match *** ******* ****. **** * **** ** *** ***** below:

***** ****** ********* **** *** ** ** ******** ****, *** wires ** * *** ****** ** *** ** *** ****** than ***** ** *** **. *** ********** ** **** **** (denoted ** *** ** *****) *** ** **** ********* ** how *** ****** *** ** ***** **** ** ****** ** staggered ****** *** ********* ******** ** *** ***** ** ******** orientation ** *** ******* *** ** **********.

**** ********** ** ******, *** ******** ******* ********* ***** **** match *** ***** ***** **** *********. *** ** ********** ****** not ** **** ** ********* *** ** ***** ******* *** fit *** *********** ** ***** ** ******** ** ***** ***********.

Single ***** **********

*** **** ****** *** ***** ********* ********* **** ** *** single ***** ******* *****. **** ***** *** ******** **** *** connector ** * ******** ***** ** **** ******* ********** **** at *** ***. ***** ***** ***** ********, * ******** **** is **** ** ***** *** *** ** *** *********, ********* the **** **** *** ***** ******** ******* *** * ***** fit:

******* **** ***** *** ******* **** *** **, ***** ********** are **** ****** *** *********** *** ***, ******* ***** $*.** - $*.** ****.

Three ***** **********

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***** *** ***** *** **** ** ********* **** * ***** end, *** ******* ** ********* * *-***** ********* ** ******* to * ****** ***** *****, ***** * ******* ******** ****** the **** ** *** ********* **** *** ***** ******.

***** **** ****** *** **** ********* ** ******* **** * single ***** *********, ****** *** ***** *********** ******* ***** $*.** - $*.** ****.

Compression ***** **********

* **** ******, *** ******* ********* *** *****-***** **** ** connector ** ***** **** *** ****** **** ******* ** ** harsh ************. *** ***** ************ ******* ****** ********* ** *******, but ** ******* ***** *****-***** ********* ********** *** ******* ******* or ****** *** ********** ******** **** *********** *** *** ******* termination *****.

**** ***** ************ * *********** ***** ********* **** ** ****. Notice **** ***** ** ******* ***** *** ********, *** ******* for *********** * ***** ** *** ** **** ***** **** are **** ********:

***** ******* *** *********** ***** ********** ****, **** ***** **** $5.00 ** $**+ ****.

Tools ******

*********** ****** ******** ******* ***********, *** *** ********* *********. *** main **** ***:

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  • ********* *******: **** **** ** **** ** **** ********** ***** ** uniform ******.  ** **** *****, ******* ****** *** ** *****-** to * ******* ** ***** *** ****** ** *** * knife. * **** ** ******* ***** *** *** **** ************* ***** $** - $** ****.
  • **** *********: ******** **** **** **** **** ********, * *** ** wire ********* *** ************ ******** ********** ******* **** **** ***** should ** **** ******* ** ****** ** *******. ***** *********** techs *** **** '* ****' *** ********* ****** ******* ******** conductors, * **** ******** ** ******** ** ******* ******. * set ***** *** *** ******* **** ********** ***** $** - $** ****.

  • **** *******: *** ******** **** ** ***** *** ********* ** *** end ** *** **** ** **** *********** *** ******* *** general *** *** ***** ****, *** * **** ******* ***** combines ******* ** *** ***** ***** *** ******* ********* ********* sizes **** * ********* ** **** ********* *****. *** ******* alone**** ***** $** - $**, *** ******** ********** *** ******* ******** ***** *****.

Image result for blue rj45 crimper

***** ********* ***** *** ***** ********* **** **** ********* **** low-voltage ************ *** **** **** ****$** *** ****** *****.  *******, ****** ********* ********** ** ** ********** ****, *********** may **** *** ******* *** ********** ** ******* **** ********, with *** **** ** ***** *************** ******* ******* ***** ********** *** ***** ***** ******* ** *** ***.

Cable *******

* *** ****** ** ******** ****** *** ********* ********** ********** overlooked ** ******** **** *** ********. ** ** **** ** create ****** ** *********** ********* **********, *** ***** ******** *** a ***** *** ** ****** **** *** **** *********.

*** ****** ** ******** *** ***** **** ****** ******** ****** all *** *** ** ******** ************* ** **** ****, *** testing ***** *** ***** ** ***** **** $** ** $**,***+ depending ** ****** ******.  ** ***** **** ******* ** ****** in *** ******* ***** ******* *****.

Termination *****

*** ****** ** **** ** ***** ** ******** ******* *** terminate * *** ***** ** *** ****; ******* *** *** done *** ******* * *** ***** *** ***** ** ******** the ******* ** **** **** * ****** (** *******) *** termination, ******** ******* **** ***** ********, *************, *** ***** **** can *** ******* ******* ** *** ******* ***** *******.

*** *******, ** ***** *** ** ***** ********* * *********, installing *** ********* ** ******** ***** ******* **** **** ********* usually ***** *** ******* **** *** *** *** * ** 10 ******* ** *** ****** *********** ******* *** ******** **********.  And **** ************ ********** *** ****, **** *** *********** ***** type ********* *****, *** ******* ****** ** ********** ******* ****** may *** ******* * ** ** ******* *** ***.

Comments (22)

I found that getting the RJ45 wires under the correct pins and then confirming this before the crimp is very helpful. The EZ-RJ45 System has helped me a lot as the Cat 5,5e,6 wires go completely through the connector (for confirming position) and the excess is cut off while crimping.

http://www.platinumtools.com/products/connectors/ez-rj45-connectors/ez-rj45-reg-cat6-connectors-100010c/

Here's a short video (1min 52 sec)of how it is done.

James I have a couple of these as well, and they are useful for the reasons you state, though after I ran out of the special connectors I just went back to the old without really missing them.

One thing to know about these is that the blade that cuts the wires off at the end can dull after a bit. You'll know it when you have more and more 'hanging chad' after releasing. Make sure to keep the blade sharp and positioned with the set screw correctly.

I ignored this and made several crimps where the blade didn't cut correctly and would stop the plug from fully inserting into the jack. They can also short if not cut cleanly.

No one ever seems to point out the importance of using the correct type of crimp for the 2 types of cabling ie either solid conductor or stranded conductor It is important to use solid conductor crimps only on solid cables and stranded conductor crimps only on stranded cables. Some claim to be universal but better to use the correct crimps. See here for further explanation....

I think it is also important to note that BICSI standards state you shouldn't terminate horizontal cable with an 8P8C connector.

However, if you do, use the correct connector. Connectors for solid with have 3 teeth that straddle the wire while connectors for stranded will have 2. What is the difference?

...BICSI standards state you shouldn't terminate horizontal cable with an 8P8C connector.

I believe this has been changed, now on the camera side there are two acceptable methods:

I believe this was discussed in some detail here:

http://ipvm.com/forums/forums/video-surveillance/topics/patch-panels-to-faceplates-biscuit-vs-simply-terminating-horizontal-cabling-with-rj45

The consensus being that horizontal cabling should typically go into a patch panel or a biscuit, but that's not always practical on the camera end.

I sit corrected. I asked our RCDD and he said he wouldn't care if the cable was terminated with a mod plug as long as the correct one was used. However, he would prefer the jack/patch cable combo for ease of installation (read: mod plugs installed poorly) and for flexibility of a stranded patch cable. Most cameras will exceed bend radius maximums for solid conductor cable.

+1 for EZ-RJ45 system. Just make sure you get the kinks out of the wires before attempting to insert into connector. Otherwise great system.

According to my PE, when running plenum cable above a drop ceiling in a plenum return, it is perfectly fine to terminate that wire on a PVC Biscuit block, so long as the block is not hidden, and remains easily accessible. Terminating Teflon horizontal runs on biscuits block is very fast. As much as I think stranded plenum patch cords would be perfect, you just can find these easily. I then recommend you have solid core plenum patch cords made up in advance..... 10' non booted, solid plenum from your sources. DeepSurplus.com $4 in QTY 80, certified....
This then would allow drop ceiling mounted cameras to be moved about, and no risk to the original run......

For exterior cameras we require STP cabling. The STP cabling terminates on a metal CAT5 Keystone Jack with the shield folded back and captured for the ground. When snapped on the grounded DIN RAIL, the keystone Jack hits a metal spring tab that grounds the jack/cable. The patch cords go to 65V surge devices ahead of the source switch....

Din Rail Shielded Cabling

According to my PE, when running plenum cable above a drop ceiling in a plenum return, it is perfectly fine to terminate that wire on a PVC Biscuit block, so long as the block is not hidden, and remains easily accessible.

With the PVC biscuit block in the ceiling, or "easily accessible" = below the ceiling?

I'd be curious to see a code reference which says putting anything PVC in a plenum return is fine.

Plastics of any sort that meet UL 2043 are approved for plenum, and they are not the same as PVC flexible cables..... PVC plastic plumbing is the same material and is in every plenum I've ever seen.

http://ul.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/ul_2043.pdf

Ethan, I had the same concerns when I was quoting a system that had a lot of relocation of drop ceiling tile mounted cameras, and installing a biscuit block instead of running a new cable made obvious sense.

I asked my PE - EE, MEM, for any comments from the BigUgly or NEC, and the answer made me feel somewhat stupid. GEEZE I didn't know....and like you assumed it was bad.

This now allows you to stand on the floor, terminate on a block, and then mount and label the block, and using pre-made plenum (solid patch cords to the cameras) speeds up the install, and provides a far more flexible install, and protects the horizontal runs from flex damages to the cameras.

Look for UL2043 and you are golden.....

https://www.siemon.com/e-catalog/ECAT_GI_page.aspx?GI_ID=wa_mx-sm-surface-mount-boxes

I wouldn't say golden. Around these parts, no AHJ will allow exposed connections in a plenum. Code or not, when they say nope, you say ok unless you've a desire for a long, pointless fight.

How about connectivity that can stand up to arc flashing caused by unplugging active PoE+ connections? Or is arcing, at the PoE+ level, marketing pufferry by the big Connectivity manufacturers? The "bruising" on the copper connectivity connections does look real and seems like it would impede the signal.

Example link (Panduit).

Agreed. And 100W 802.3bt is on the way.

Today though, you could always use a small midspan right after the switch for those ports requiring POE+, to limit the arcing to the spare pairs.

Not sure if arcflash comments were intended as a reason not to place an approved termination block in a plenum, but NFP70E arcflash rules are safety issues in an industrial environment to prevent person injury. IF a plenum had a gas concentration that could be ignited by a POE jack, you had a much larger problem in the first place. First the gas would have fell to the floor via return grills and could be ignited by higher voltage light switches etc. You might be over thinking this.

NFPA 70E

Andrew, nobody said anything about gas concentrations exploding. Und2 specifically refers to possible signal loss due to oxidation from arcing. He's not even talking about plenum spaces.

You might be over thinking this.

once again my PE,EE, MEM points me to NEC 300.22,23

AC line powered components should be in an approved enclosure in the plenum space. Access points that are listed or compliant to UL 2043 (Plenum rated components), and which are powered by Power over Ethernet (PoE), may be placed in the plenum space without an enclosure.

UL listed, metal ceiling enclosures can provide the confidence that the installation is compliant with NEC 2011 requirements and will satisfy even the strictest local and regional code enforcement authorities, regardless of whether AC line power, or PoE, is used to power the electronics.

So I guess your local regulations, or a specific requirement might prevent you from terminating a Plenum cable onto a standard CAT block (look for UL2043 plastic) and then using plenum patch cables to cameras or access points. However, a small metal enclosure might prevent you from otherwise having to pull a new cable to move a camera 10' in the longer direction.

For us, terminating onto patch blocks 1/2/4 block in the plenum, near where a group of cameras are going to be, and plenum patch cables will speed up installs, be safer as less time on the ladder, better terminations, no installation of RJ45 jacks by 1/2 blind guys like me, and no kinking bending of the horizontal runs going directly into cameras.... and options to move further. like having a cable-stretcher.

A or B standard... jeepers it would be good if it was all just A! :)

A or B standard... jeepers it would be good if it was all just A! :)

Agreed! Or B.

Haha true... what ever it is it should be the same all over the world!! like left and right had drive cars!

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