HID 'Twist and Go' Access Control

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Sep 30, 2014

Credential giant HID Global is making it easier to use cell phones as credentials. Instead of pushing buttons to turn on an app, users need only to raise and tilt their phones in a concept HID calls 'Twist & Go'.

We examine how HID has implemented gesture controls in their mobile credential, the limitations on deploying this with existing systems and what competitive impact this may have.

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Comments (11)

Since this is bluetooth enabled.... could this be a potential deathknell for the long range readers that require a 1'x1' surface area, and extra power supplies - or the even longer credentialed readers from AWID and Farpointe that require seperate credentials to read farther distances?

Bluetooth has a pretty long range.

No, I think no one will use this simply because it is Bluetooth. Not too many people walk around with their bluetooth constantly enabled for security and battery life reasons

Yes, and I have yet to see where bluetooth reads as fast as a normal contactless card.

I don't mean transfer rate. I mean the amount of time it takes the devices to 'see each other' so they can pair and trade data.

We've tested a few BLE equipped devices, (for example Lockitron) and it always took a few seconds of waiting before connections were made. In an access control application, even a half-second delay can be too long, and two or three full seconds feel eternal.

In the HID video it seems to go quick, but thats also an advertisement for HID.

You know, the "twist and go" feature could be there to help mask that delay.

I think it is that quick if you are already connected to the reader.

If your phone is paired with other things (like your car or ear mic), it might take a few seconds to switch over and connect.

Just checking? Does this output a Wiegand based "card number"? I guess you set it up from the website, send the user a link, they input the code as seen on the video on the HID website. The phone transmits a token to the reader when twisted, in effect like a card?

I am looking to integrate this solution with a paxton system so would require a actual wiegand or even clock and data code?

The way HID has implemented this, the phone communicates with the reader via BLE, so you'd need to 'buy in' to HID mobile credentials and use iClass SE readers to use it with a Paxton system.

Here's the Twist & Go spec sheet detailing this.

Thanks Brian :) So in a traditional method a reader would detect the token and transmit via wiegand to the Paxton control unit as a 8 digit code. I guess this code is available to view on the HID enrollment / license website or is it hidden ?

Maybe another way to getting this would be to "twist and go" a HID se reader and have that reader setup in Paxton as a desktop reader so the code is read into the Paxton system - this brings me to my last part. I guess this code must be fixed? :)

The access control code is visible to the administrator through the HID enrollment website. You can also export a csv file of users with card numbers and other user data to import into your access system. The admin can choose whether or not to make it visible on the card image shown on the mobile device. When you establish your account (which requires purchase of 100 mobile credentials), you get to select what card format you want your mobile credentials to have.

Thank you for this, perfect :)

Does anyone know ballpark cost on licensing for HID mobile access?

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