Google Maps Camera Calculator Released

Author: John Honovich, Published on Apr 27, 2015

The new IPVM Google Maps Camera Calculator empowers surveillance professionals to plan and design systems like never before.

Whatever project you are working on, enter the address and start mapping out cameras. This video overviews what the calculator does:

Add Cameras

Start by clicking on the 'add cameras' button which will drop a camera on the map, like so:

Street View Displayed

Plus, it will display the street view of that exact spot if Google has it captured, as shown below:

Auto Updating Street View

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Move the cameras around and the IPVM calculator will automatically find the new related street view, like so:

Pixel Density Calculated

The IPVM calculator also automatically calculates the PPF / PPM of the camera, factoring in its current FoV, distance and camera setting, as shown in the lower right-hand corner:

Try It Now

Try the IPVM Google Maps Camera Calculator now.

Unlimited Cameras For Members

Plus, you can add an unlimited number of cameras, as an IPVM Pro Member, like so:

And these can be laid out anywhere in the world, as the example below from the IPVM calculator shows:

Pick Camera Models

PRO Members pick from more than 2500 camera models in the IPVM database, like this PTZ model below, and see the coverage options available to you, all the while automatically updating the street view and the PPF / PPM preview:

Measure Distances

Indeed, you can even use the IPVM Google Maps Camera Calculator to measure approximate distances for your sites:

Naming / Editing / Deleting

Name any camera, edit the name later and delete any camera. You simply right click the camera icon to do so. The name of the camera will be displayed whenever you hover over a camera.

This 12-second video demonstrates it:

Various Applications, e.g., Parking Lots

Lay out cameras wherever you want. For example, experiment with the right coverage for a parking lot, try narrow FoV, 180 cameras, short range, wide angle, etc:

Try It Now

Try the IPVM Google Maps Camera Calculator now.

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Comments (28)

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This is amazing!!! Thank you!!!

This has the potential to be outstanding.

Couple of questions: Who "owns" the maps after they are created?

Can they be saved under a project name, and

How private are they and can they be retained, shared with an end user for editing, etc?

John,

Yes, you can save cameras as projects and take snapshots of calculations, see options below in red:

Each saved calculation is private to your own account.

You can show it to end users or show the...

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I do not see how to delete a camera from a multi-camera project. That would be useful.

Larry,

Right now, you can delete and edit cameras from the save dialogue. That's cumbersome of course.

Next month, we plan to add a right click control to name, edit and delete cameras.

Thanks for the feedback.

Are there any licensing issues or similar with using Google's imagery? Any limitations or caveats as far as that goes that we should know about?

On our side, there are licensing requirements (in terms of accessibility and usage load).

From a user's side, I am not aware of any major non-obvious ones (those interested, here are the Google Map terms).

Pretty cool so far. Could use a "corridor mode" option though.

It is one our list of future additions.

Any update on this feature? Would have been useful today.

Well done Gentlemen! No more switching from google maps to lens calculators to camera vendor pages, this tool has it all in one handy interface and adds export too. This looks like it will be a huge time saver.

#bookmarked

This is incredibly useful. Thank you for your hard work!

I can't wait for IPVM to add Nightingale mode so I can just click on the map, have an IPVM drone fly in, take a bunch of scene photos and load them in to the Camera Calculator. That's about the only thing the Camera Calculator doesn't do yet!

This is phenomenal! Like anything else, it will build functionality - great work.

This is an excellent tool and well worth the price of subscription by itself! Are there any plans to address camera mounting height? I realize the data is limited by what Google can provide with their street views, but this is still useful information. Also, if we could upload our own prints to replace the Google data this would be a one-stop tool for all of our basic design needs. That...

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A, thanks for the feedback.

On mounting height, Google Street View is taken from a camera about 8 - 9 feet high, like so:

I am not sure what we could do given that limitation. We could provide other visuals to show deadspots / etc. This is being...

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Perhaps I'm missing something, but when I place a camera on the map, it always points in the same direction. I don't see a way to adjust the orientation of the camera (e.g. rotate the camera 90 degrees). Is this supported?

Yes, it is. Grab the person at the end of the field of view, and click and drag that marker to move the camera.

See here, look how the camera is rotated: