Hikvision Ezviz Touts Robust Security

Author: John Honovich, Published on Mar 11, 2016

Hikvision's poor security track recordChinese government ownership and hiding of their own brand in the consumer space has raised many concerns about their direct sales to American consumers. Indeed, a Google Consumer survey showed significant resistance.

Now, Hikvision has gone public with a statement explaining and defending their security.

Key ****** ****

****** ****** ********* *****:

  • ***** ***** ******* ** *** ** ****** *** ********, **** "all **** *** *********** ******" ** *** ****** ******.
  • ***** ***** ******** ******* ** *****
  • "***** ** ** ** ******* *** ***** *******"
  • "****** *** ****** ******** ** ***** ******* *** **** ** accessed ******* *** *********** ***** ***."
  • "****** *** **** *** *********** *** ***** *** ***"
  • "************ **** ** ******** ** **** **** **** *** ******** video, *** **** ******* ** *** ********** *******. *** ******** is *** **** ****** **** *** ************ ****, *** ***** is ** ******* **** **** *** ******** *** **********."

** **** ** ******** ***** ****** ** ******** *****.

Still ******* **** *****

***** ** ******* ********* *** ******* * ******** *** ******** set ** ********* ******, ** ***** ********* **** ** ** forthright ***** *** **** ***.

*************** *************:

"***** ** ************* ****** ** ********, **********. ***** ******** ***** ******* ****** ********** video. ** ****** *** ************..."

***** ************* ******* *** ********* ***** *** *********. **** ** ******** trust ** ******** ** ***** **** ***** *** *** ***. ****** the ****** **** ** ********* ***** ****** *** ** ** good **** ********* ** ******* **** ******** ***** ***** ******** practices.

Comments (17)

EZVIZ North America is run on Amazon Web Services, with "all data and connections remain" in the United States.

Last time I checked the Internet lacked any customs or border patrol, so I am not sure how they could insure that routers not on U.S. soil would not ever pass traffic.

As a practical matter, I'm not sure how often your data would actually leave the country (during transmission), but it is a naive statement nonetheless.

  • "There is no IP address for EZVIZ cameras"

Ethan pulled up the Ezviz Mini in Hikvision's own software tool, showing an IP address for it:

"There is no IP address for EZVIZ cameras"

If these are network cameras connected to a home/business router, it will have an IP address. Their software may not disclose it, rather using a cloud/app connection, it still has an IP address. I believe they are referring to it not having a web browser interface (HTTP web page), which is different than it having an IP address (TCP/IPv4).

Just like hwen people confuse the world wide web with the Internet.

2, yes, I agree I think they are just confusing the two but still...

Here is the full quote:

"One critical element that distinguishes EZVIZ's security measures from others is that there is no IP address for EZVIZ cameras -- meaning no direct web connection to EZVIZ products."

They emphasized it quite clearly 'no IP address', which is strange to say the least.

Yes, I think they mean from the outside.

So if you were to establish a connection to your home camera from your phone using the local Starbucks free wireless, you wouldn't see a connection to your home IP, only the generic IP to their Amazon cloud service which is relays the data pushed to it from your home.

So no inbound connection for video, only outbound to the cloud.

IMHO, that's what they are trying to say, but still just guessing based on other p2p implementations I've read about.

"relays the data pushed to it from your home"

And inside your home, the Ezviz camera has an IP address that it uses to interface with the cloud service.

If Hikvision wants to say what you say, they should say it. However, they published a document saying "there is no IP address for EZVIZ cameras"

"there is no IP address for EZVIZ cameras"

Maybe they're referring to the TVI cameras, LOL.

Or maybe they're running LonWorks...

I think a lot of you are confused. They simply meant a public facing IP address. Of course any device using TCP/IP will have an IP address. But, it doesn't have to be public facing. You need to be able to speak Chinglish. I'm fluent.

"You need to be able to speak Chinglish. I'm fluent."

But:

"EZVIZ is a North American company headquartered in City of Industry, California"

I suspect it is not a 'Chinglish' issue as much as it is a marketing department who has deficiencies communicating about technology.

You need to be able to speak Chinglish. I'm fluent.

Prove it. What's a "male Wallace house"? (Don't skip the ending.)

EZVIZ is super secure in that it's nearly impossible to make it work right...

3, what specific problems have you faced? We are in the middle of testing the Ezviz mini and found a fairly fundamental wireless connection (or lack thereof) problem.

The one time I tried to use it, it refused to configure UPnP on the router despite that being enabled, the EZVIZ app refused to recognize the QR code (once I found the version that was in English), it wouldn't let me log in on my phone with the account I set up with it (I eventually just created a new one that did work), then when I added it to the client's phone it refused to log in with either account... at that point I gave up and configured port forwarding on the router manually and just configured the regular app on his phone with his internet IP (you know, the old fashioned way).

John,

Ezviz touts that their WiFi camera doesn't have a default password, but the camera itself has a default verification code which is used as a camera password on the product itself next to the QR code and it stays as default code unless the user changes it. So this is also contradicting their claim about not having a default password. You should point out this claim as well.

Also, do you know how I can verify that all my data is staying in the US AWS servers instead of other co-located AWS servers?

Ezviz touts that their WiFi camera doesn't have a default password, but the camera itself has a default verification code which is used as a camera password on the product itself next to the QR code and it stays as default code unless the user changes it.

What is the default password then? 8888888? 6666666?

Or do you mean each camera has a unique pre-assigned password?

Each camera has a six-character alphanumeric access code. You'll find it on a bunch of Hikvision stuff, also, below the serial number. You have to enter it when adding it to EZVIZ, and sometimes you have to enter it again to view video.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Most Recent Industry Reports

Worst Access Control 2018 on Apr 18, 2018
Three access control providers stood out as providing the most problems for integrators. In this report, we analyze the answers to: "In the...
April 2018 IP Networking Course on Apr 17, 2018
Only 2 days left to register for our IP Networking course. Register now. NEW - 2 sessions per class, 'day' and 'night' to give you double the...
Axis VMD4 Analytics Tested on Apr 17, 2018
Axis is now on its 4th generation of video motion detection (VMD), which Axis calls "a free video analytics application." In this generation, Axis...
Arecont CEO And President Resign on Apr 17, 2018
This is good news for Arecont. Arecont's problems have been well known for years (e.g., most recently Worst Camera Manufacturers 2018 and starting...
Strong ISC West 2018, Says Manufacturers, GSX / ASIS Expected Weaker on Apr 17, 2018
Manufacturers say ISC West 2018 was strong, continuing the trend we have seen in 2017 results and 2016 results. However, those same 100...
Key Control For Access Control Tutorial on Apr 16, 2018
End users spend thousands on advanced systems to keep themselves secure, but regularly neglect one of the lest expensive yet most important aspects...
Best and Worst ISC West 2018 on Apr 16, 2018
ISC West 2018 had strong attendance, modest overall new products, and a surge in Artificial Intelligence marketing. First, here are 20+...
Alarm.com Business Market Expansion on Apr 13, 2018
Alarm.com has millions of subscribers, but the company has traditionally been mostly a residential/home focused offering.  ADC's new Smart Business...
GDPR For Video Surveillance Guide on Apr 12, 2018
The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force on May 25, but there is much confusion and no clear guidelines on...
Axis Launches Mini Concealed IR PTZ on Apr 11, 2018
Axis has been a laggard in releasing IR PTZs. While the company released a laser focus PTZ (the Q6155-E tested) until now Axis has had no PTZs with...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact