DVTel Mobile App Examined

By: Ethan Ace, Published on Oct 20, 2011

DVTel's mobile app provides a number of important features that we rarely, if ever see in surveillance applications. While literally hundreds of mobile apps are available for various surveillance platforms, most offer the same few features, often limited to viewing a handful of cameras and often live video only. In this update, we examine DVTel's simply-named Mobile App, and its capabilities which may be of special interest to mobile guard forces.

Panic Button/Google Maps Integration

The most interesting feature of the DVTel mobile app, which we have not seen in other products, is the addition of a panic button in the mobile app, and integration to Google Maps for positioning. Guards or other staff may push this button to send a duress signal. The mobile app uses the mobile device's built-in GPS to send coordinates. These coordinates are then displayed in a Google Map on an operator's workstation in the security office. The main operator may then use cameras local to the guard (displayed on the same map view) to view the scene and respond appropriately. This location integration may also be used for real-time tracking of staff positions.

Instant Replay/Record Features

The mobile app's instant replay and remote record features stand out. These functions are both acheived via buttons overlayed on each camera in the user interface. If a guard sees activity which should be recorded, he or she can press the manual record button to begin recording. Likewise, if the guard notices suspicious activity and needs to review actions it, the instant replay button provides quick access to archived video leading up to it. A number of apps offer access to archived video, but these two features may simplify these common tasks. While some surveillance mobile applications support search functionality, this is the simplest way we have seen to quickly review the immediate past.

Overview

The Mobile App is licensed for connecting to DVTel Latitude servers. Connections are facilitated via DVTel's transcoder service, which is used to manage stream sizes for various mobile users, not just mobile app users. The transcoder service is also capable of multiple configurations, so users with different bandwidth needs - 3G versus wi-fi, for example - may receive different stream sizes.

The mobile app is licensed by concurrent connections, with an MSRP of $300 per connection required. Any number of user accounts may access the mobile app, but if only ten licenses are purchased, only ten users at a time may be connected, for example.

Whether the transcoder requires a separate server depends on how many streams are being requested and what bitrates these streams are using. Because this can vary greatly based on number of users, stream types required, concurrent connections, and more, it is difficult to guess without knowing individual customer requirements.

A video overview of the DVTel mobile app is embedded below. The interesting portion on instant replay and panic button starts at 2:40:

Like most surveillance manufacturer's mobile applications, the app only supports DVTel's only VMS. While we see it as an interesting advantage for DVTel, it is not something one can easily utilize unless they are currently a DVTel user or are actively searching for a new VMS platform.

Comments : PRO Members only. Login. or Join.

Most Recent Industry Reports

TMA Apologizes to Amazon / Ring on Aug 23, 2019
Not only is Amazon / Ring making major incursions into the residential security market, the organization representing the biggest incumbents, The...
China Dahua Replaces Their Software With US Pepper on Aug 22, 2019
What does a US government banned company do to improve its security positioning in the US? Well, Dahua is unveiling a novel solution, partnering...
Security Integrators Outlook On Remaining Integrators In 2025 on Aug 22, 2019
The industry has changed substantially in the last decade, with the rise of IP cameras and the race to the bottom. Indeed, more changes may be...
First GDPR Facial Recognition Fine For Sweden School on Aug 22, 2019
A school in Sweden has been fined $20,000 for using facial recognition to keep attendance in what is Sweden's first GDPR fine. Notably, the fine is...
Anyvision Facial Recognition Tested on Aug 21, 2019
Anyvision is aiming for $1 billion in revenue by 2022, backed by $74 million in funding. But does their performance live up to the hype they have...
JCI Sues Wyze on Aug 21, 2019
The mega manufacturer / integrator JCI has sued the fast-growing $20 camera Seattle startup Wyze. Inside this note: Share the court...
Dahua 4K Camera Shootout on Aug 20, 2019
Dahua's new Pro Series 4K N85CL5Z claims to "deliver superior images in all lighting and environmental conditions", but how does this compare to...
ZK Teco Atlas Access Control Tested on Aug 20, 2019
Who needs access specialists? China-based ZKTeco claims its newest access panel 'makes it very easy for anyone to learn and install access control...
Uniview Beats Intel In Trademark Lawsuit on Aug 19, 2019
Uniview has won a long-running trademark lawsuit brought by Intel, with Beijing's highest court reversing an earlier Intel win, centered on...
Suprema Biometric Mass Leak Examined on Aug 19, 2019
While Suprema is rarely discussed even within the physical security market, the South Korean biometrics manufacturer made global news this past...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact