New Product: Free Flow Turnstile (dFlow)

By: Brian Rhodes, Published on May 05, 2016

A new turnstile uses a totally different approach for access control than anything else on the market.  Instead of unlocking to let people through, it slams closed on unauthorized users.

However, the developer says this approach is fundamentally better than traditional units and claims security is just as good, if not better. And it uses high-tech sensors to support those claims.

In this note, we look at Digicon's dFlow Turnstile, examine how it differs from typical units, and see if it really is the game-changer it claims to be.

* *** ********* **** a ******* ********* ******** for ****** ******* **** anything **** ** *** market.  ******* ** ********* to *** ****** *******, it ***** ****** ** unauthorized *****.

*******, *** ********* **** this ******** ** ************* better **** *********** ***** and ****** ******** ** just ** ****, ** not ******. *** ** uses ****-**** ******* ** ******* those ******.

** **** ****, ** look *********'* ***** *********, ******* *** ** differs **** ******* *****, and *** ** ** really ** *** ****-******* it ****** ** **.

[***************]

The '**** ****' **********

*** **** ******* *********** difference *** *** ***** optical ********* ** **** the ******** *** ******** open *** **** ***** when ** ************ ****** attempts ** **** ****:

*** ******* ***** ** this ******** ** ******, because "*** **** ******** of ***** **** ***** access ***********" *** ******* of ******* *** ******** of ***** ***** ** spend **** ********* * turnstile, *** ********* ******* open ***** ****** ** stop *** ******* ********.

**** ******** *** *** typically **** ***** * much ****** **********, *** company ******* ** "******* applications **** ** ** the **-** ***** *** minute, significantly ****** **** ******* ****/****** control *******" **** ******* 10-20 ***** *** ******.

Product ********

*** ************'* **** ***** below ***** *** ********* and ******* *********** ** the ******, **** ***** complex ********* **** ********** ** ********:

Key **********

***** ** ***** ** be ********** **** ********** compared **** *********** ***************** turnstiles:

**** ******: ***** ** ********* to ***** ***** **** quickly. *** * **” wide ****, *** ******* speed ***** ** ******* 0.4 *** *.* ***.

******** *****: ******* **** ******* speed ** * ******** of *** ********, ***** and ************ ** *** unauthorized **** ** *** gate. *** ******* ********* this ** **:

** ** ************ **** enters *** **** ******, the ***** ***** ******. If **** ***** *******, the ***** ***** ******. By *** **** *****, if **** **** ********* towards *** **** ********, the ***** **** **** faster ** ****** ** they *****.

*********** ********: *** ***** *** made ** * *********** polymer, ******* *** ****** of ****** ** ***. The ***** *** ******** with * ****** ****** which ****** *** ****** force.

**** ***********: ***** **** ** interface ***** ** ********* to ******** ****** ******* systems, ***** ********** ** Wiegand, ******, ****, ** Code *** ******. *** turnstile *** ********* *** RS-232, **** *** ******** (using ****), ** */* contacts *** ******* ***********.

**** ***** ********: *** **** ******** inputs *** *********** **** fire ***** *******, ** barriers *** **** **** for **** ****** ****** emergencies.

*****

*** **** ***** ** dFlow ** *** ** starts ** $**,***. ******* depends ** ******* ************* and *** **** ***** a ****** **** ** designed ** ***********.  **** than * ****** **** will ****** ** * higher *****.

Time ** ****** *****

** ***** ** ** responsive ** ******* *** detect *** ******** *** order ** ***** ****** invalid *****, **** ******** adjacent ** **** *****, dFlow **** * ***** type ** ********* ******: Time ** ******, ** ToF.

**** ****** ** ******* directly ******** ** *** turnstile, ** ** *** detect *** **** *********** inside *** *********. ** asked ******* ** ********* on **** ******** ******* of *********** *** ***** sensors:

**** ** ******* ******* at *** ******* ** FREE **** (******** **** gates) ** ******** **** the ******* ******** ********, point-to-point ** ******* *** not **** *** ********* resolution ******** *** ********* precise **** ********. ** we ******* ******* ** overhead ******* *** ******* on * ** ******. ToF ** **** ** this ****** ** *******. dFlow *** ***** ******** users (********** ** ***) within *** ***** **** with **** **** *********.

***** *** ** *** sensors ** ***** ********** new ** ********, *** technology *** **** ******* in ******** *********. **** this ****-********** ****** **** ***** *** *******'* ** **** ** Flight ******. ***** ******* ******** of **** ********** ** still *** *** ******* expensive ******** ** ***** sensor/detection *******, *** ***** **** ToF ** * ****** performing *** ********* ******** detection ** *******.

Company *******

********* * ********* ********* *** pedestrian **** ************ **** now ********* **** ********* markets. *** *******'* ******* line ******** ***** *** turnstiles (*******-********** *** *********) in * ******* ** models, **** ****** ********** (single *** ******) *** motorized *****. ***** ***** is *** ****** ********, the ******* ******* ** continue ******** *********** ********* products.

*** ******* ********* ***** through * ****** ******* to *** *****, ***** it ** ******* ** expand ****** ***** *******.

************** Access ******* ************

*****'* ************ ********* ******** to **** ****** **** not ** * *** everywhere **********, **** ***** optical **********, *** ******** used.  ** ***** ** physical ********, *** ***-****** construction *** *********** ******* panels **** **** * determined ************ **** *** simply *** **** ** force **** *** ******.

******, ***** *** ******** and ******* ***** ** fast, ** **** ******** access ***** ******* ** required, * ************ ****-****** turnstile ** ******** **** will ** ********.

*******, *** ***** ***** risks *** *** *** the **** ********** ** typically ****-********* **** ****** control, ***** ***** ***** a **** ********** ******* congestion-prone *********** ** * way **** *** ***** products *** *******.

Comments (21)

Since 1961 this type of turnstile has been used at the USSR subway stations

I posted the first video I found. This one is broken but it shows how it works.

This type of turnstiles worked well but it was dangerous and a bit scary )

Holy cow, that thing looks like it could break legs.

I am curious how/why the turnbuckles close? A bad card/token read? Motion detectors?

It was painful but usually it closed before you reached the point when it could hit you.

It worked with coins, then tokens, then cards. You can see holes from each side these are sensors. And this retro video shows the process.

Ask dFlow if their fancy Terahertz scanner can put a stop to such low-tech exploits such as the one at the 2 minute mark in the retro video, one that is clearly vulnerable to mixed-pair figure skaters.

I would try it how it handles these situations:

One of the Soviet innovations that came from the Space Race no doubt.

We got Tang, they got state-of-the-art access control.

And this is technology that wouldn't be duplicated for another 50 years.

Konstantin, can you explain how this was supposed to be an improvement, at least in theory, on just opening on authentication?

With the dFlow it makes sense, since you can have multiple people going thru with little gap between them, but here since everyone has to present auth of some sort, and the gap between the "reader" and the gate is large enough and the gate closes quick enough, there seems ample time to open for each person.

Plus, the time saved from the reauth runaround process would make it even faster, no?

Sure, it might save energy, but was that the main objective?

Konstantin, can you explain how this was supposed to be an improvement, at least in theory, on just opening on authentication?

Did I say somewhere that it is an improvement? Personally I see no serious difference between them. In theory dFlow can have higher throughput but I doubt that in real life there will be significant difference.

From a user point of view I think that scheme: "stop - present credential - see gates opening - start moving" is better than "present credentials on the go - be stopped by gates -try to reach the reader through the people stacked behind you".

Did I say somewhere that it is an improvement?

Did I say somewhere you did? :)

But, I am actually wondering what the Soviets had in mind when they rolled this thing out. Was it intended to speed things up, save power, or just whack people in the crotch at random to keep 'em guessing?

It was chosen from 32 projects in 1957 and I believe this choice was based on the level of technology at that time.

Now it depends on a country and city. This photo is from the Moscow subway.

Why are they closed?

Because it is a different type.

Although looking vaguely Egyptian, this is yet another Russian turnstile innovation, though a bit lower-tech.

Apparently most fare jumpers are male...

I like this approach where life safety codes make it difficult to put in a traditional turnstile

As a man, I'm not comfortable with anything flying towards my nether regions.

As a man, I'm not comfortable with anything flying towards my nether regions.

As Konstantin says above, it's only painful when it hits you.

As for the dFlow, it's an adaptive response based on real-time data from 3d sensors, so you should be fine. Anyway, if I'm not mistaken that board is sourced from the leader in the field, Johnson Controls, whose name speaks for itself.

Eagerly looking forward to their Yosemite Sam trapdoor variant!

Am I the only one who likes the potential in this approach? I have run into projects that life safety codes prohibited anything other than an optical approach rather than physical - this would probably work in that application.

Can you please clarify what difference from the point of life safety codes you see between this product and other turnstiles?

If it is Card In/Out then there has to be an emergency door (or alternative) because even dFlow wings are not closed they will close in front of a person without the right credential. If it is Card In only then again there is no difference between turnstiles because all of them will allow free egress.

Am I missing something?

dFlow has a fire-alarm override contact and can be used in 'card-in' configurations only.

The turnstiles in the dflow videos I saw look like they are meant to keep people from entering unauthorized and allow free egress - they aren't even deployed until approached without authorization- wonder if you even need to deal with an override in this setup.

If your customer does not want "physical" then you can propose them something like this

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports on Access Control

ZK Teco Atlas Access Control Tested on Aug 20, 2019
Who needs access specialists? China-based ZKTeco claims its newest access panel 'makes it very easy for anyone to learn and install access control...
Suprema Biometric Mass Leak Examined on Aug 19, 2019
While Suprema is rarely discussed even within the physical security market, the South Korean biometrics manufacturer made global news this past...
Biometrics Usage Statistics 2019 on Aug 13, 2019
Biometrics are commonly used in phones, but how frequently are they used for access? 150+ integrators told us how often they use biometrics,...
ProdataKey (PDK) Access Company Profile on Aug 09, 2019
 Utah based ProdataKey touts low cost cloud access, wireless controllers, and no dealer required national distribution availability.  But how does...
Axis Door Station A8207-VE Tested on Aug 07, 2019
Axis newest door station, the A8207-VE, claims to deliver "video surveillance, two-way communication, and access control" in a single device. But...
Mobile Access Control Shootout - Farpointe, HID, Openpath, Nortek, Proxy on Jul 29, 2019
One of the biggest rising trends in access control is using phones as credentials but which offering is best? IPVM has tested five of the...
Responsibility Split Selecting Locks - Statistics on Jul 22, 2019
A heated access debate surrounds who should pick and install the locks. While responsible for selecting the control systems, integrators often...
Mobile Access Usage Statistics 2019 on Jul 18, 2019
The ability to use mobile phones as access credentials is one of the biggest trends in a market that historically has been slow in adopting new...
How To Troubleshoot Wiegand Reader Problems - Inverted Wiring on Jul 16, 2019
Wiegand is the dominant method of connecting access readers, but problems can arise for installers. In fact, one of the most difficult reader...
Nortek Blue Pass Mobile Access Reader Tested on Jul 11, 2019
Nortek claims BluePass mobile readers are a 'more secure and easy to use approach to access', but our testing uncovered security problems and...

Most Recent Industry Reports

TMA Apologizes to Amazon / Ring on Aug 23, 2019
Not only is Amazon / Ring making major incursions into the residential security market, the organization representing the biggest incumbents, The...
China Dahua Replaces Their Software With US Pepper on Aug 22, 2019
What does a US government banned company do to improve its security positioning in the US? Well, Dahua is unveiling a novel solution, partnering...
Security Integrators Outlook On Remaining Integrators In 2025 on Aug 22, 2019
The industry has changed substantially in the last decade, with the rise of IP cameras and the race to the bottom. Indeed, more changes may be...
First GDPR Facial Recognition Fine For Sweden School on Aug 22, 2019
A school in Sweden has been fined $20,000 for using facial recognition to keep attendance in what is Sweden's first GDPR fine. Notably, the fine is...
Anyvision Facial Recognition Tested on Aug 21, 2019
Anyvision is aiming for $1 billion in revenue by 2022, backed by $74 million in funding. But does their performance live up to the hype they have...
JCI Sues Wyze on Aug 21, 2019
The mega manufacturer / integrator JCI has sued the fast-growing $20 camera Seattle startup Wyze. Inside this note: Share the court...
Dahua 4K Camera Shootout on Aug 20, 2019
Dahua's new Pro Series 4K N85CL5Z claims to "deliver superior images in all lighting and environmental conditions", but how does this compare to...
ZK Teco Atlas Access Control Tested on Aug 20, 2019
Who needs access specialists? China-based ZKTeco claims its newest access panel 'makes it very easy for anyone to learn and install access control...
Uniview Beats Intel In Trademark Lawsuit on Aug 19, 2019
Uniview has won a long-running trademark lawsuit brought by Intel, with Beijing's highest court reversing an earlier Intel win, centered on...
Suprema Biometric Mass Leak Examined on Aug 19, 2019
While Suprema is rarely discussed even within the physical security market, the South Korean biometrics manufacturer made global news this past...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact