Debunking Assa Abloy President's Next Big Thing

By: Brian Rhodes, Published on Sep 29, 2014

The President of one of the biggest names in access control has proclaimed the next big thing: energy reduction for electrified hardware.

Assa's leader placed access control as the next frontier for saving money on power, citing his conglomerate's line of EcoFlex locks [link no longer available] as key in making this happen.

The big problem with this claim? Most access users will only save a few bucks per year with a 'green lock'.  We examine EcoFlex and crunch the numbers in this note.

*** ********* ** *** of *** ******* ***** in ****** ******* *** proclaimed *** **** *** thing: ****** ********* *** electrified ********.

****'* ****** ****** ****** ******* as *** **** ******** for ****** ***** ** power, ****** *** ************'* line ** ******* ***** [link ** ****** *********] as *** ** ****** this ******.

*** *** ******* **** **** claim? **** ****** ***** will **** **** * few ***** *** **** with * '***** ****'.  ** examine ******* *** ****** *** numbers ** **** ****.

[***************]

Promoting *******

**** ***** *** ****** EcoFlex's ******* ********** *********** as * *** *** access *** ***** *** several *****. ****** *** benefits ** ***** '***** initiatives', ***** **** ***** to *** ******** ******* like ********, **** *** air ************ *** **** thousands *** ****. 

**** **** ** *** do *** **** *** access **** ******* *********** locks. ***** *** ***** video ***** *** ** overview:

*******'* ******* ***** ** that *** ****** **** 96% **** ***** **** Other *****: ******* ******* uses ***-******* *********, *** hardware ******** **** **** power **** *************.

Checking **** *****

******* ** ** *** line's **** ****** [**** no ****** *********] ***** power *********** *** ******* looks **** ****:

*** *** ****** ***** show *** **** ***** the **** ***** **** activated (*** ******) *** *** **** is **** ***** ******* dormant (** **) ** 12 ***.  

**** ***** **** **** locks **** *** **** than */* **** *** hour, *** *** **** than $* ** *********** per **** ** ****** use.

The ***********

*******, *** *********** **** $2 *** **** **** when ********** **** **********'* products? ****** **********'* ***** use **** ***** (**:*** ********* ******** *** ** @*****)

***** ********* *** **** power, *** *********** ***** only **** ~$** *** year ** ***********.

Saving ******* *** ****

***** **** ******** ** sharp, ** ***** ** not * *********** ***** of *** ********** **** for *** **** ******** of ****** *****. **** **** ******"(*******) ** *** * big **** ** *** just **** * ****** of ***** ** **** building, *** **** ** our ********* **** ******** and ******** ** *****" in ***.

*******, **** * **** percentage ** ******* ***** to **** ****. *** example, ********* ****** **** ****** ***** *% ** *** systems ****** **** **** 64 *****, *** **** than **% ****** ** or *****.

*** * ** **** system ***** ******* *****, the ***** ****** ******* would ** ~$*** *** year.

********* *** *** ****** to ***** ******* ********* to ******* *** ******* new ******* ***** *** the ******** ** ****** (at ****) * *** hundred ******* *** **** in ***********. 

* **** *** **** ***** save **** ** ********* but ******** ** ** annual ****** **** ** millions *** ******** **** spent ** ****** ******* system, ***** ******* *** little **** **** * rounding *****.

Similar ***** ******

******, ******* ****** **** been **** (******) ** the ***** ************ **** but **** **** **** little ******** - ***: ****** *** ** *** Green ***** ************? *** ********* **********'* ***** **********.

Comments (8)

I agree that the potential for energy savings in this area is negligible, particularly since the majority of door hardware used with access control systems is (or should be IMO) of the "fail-secure" variety, which only requires power when the door is actually being unlocked.

This seems to be an appeal to the A/E community, which is currently obsessed with the Green Movement and LEED compliance.

Agreed.

I'm all for being efficient and smart with energy design, like most of the world. If EcoFlex is more efficient, then great. Make sure that bullet is on the spec sheet. Then we're done talking about it.

Instead, ASSA is spending big bucks whipping up fluff and building a product identity on a (very) minor feature. We hear 'Energy reduction is the next phase' for access? Gee whiz. That's really the next big thing?

How about we talk about how locks improve security?

Also this observation is key here: "This seems to be an appeal to the A/E community, which is currently obsessed with the Green Movement and LEED compliance."

A&E's are the primary target for the EcoFlex marketing, not end users or SIs. ASSA is fighting to get independent specifiers and the decision makers to write in their product on new jobs.

The way I understand it, there are a number of rebates and incentives for using 'green' products in new designs. I have to wonder: If 'Green' wasn't subsidized, would A&Es still care?

How much of an impact does using EcoFlex make in getting to LEED compliance?

This page on Assa's website is devoted to using their products to earn LEED credits.

The above statement would be for an installation involving continuos duty locks, which accounts for a fraction of the systems out there.

500ma peak current draw also known as inrush refers to the amount of current required to retract the solenoid upon initial activation.

15ma holding current draw refers to the amount of current consumed for the duration of the programmed activation of the door lock on average 6 seconds.

so with that being said the average energy consumption per year is more like 25 cents in projects consisting fail secure locks.

if they can redesign the electric solenoid in the 8800 device with electric latch retraction to only draw this much it would be a welcome change.

the other issue this brings about is historically a high inrush is required to account for pressure on the lever or pulling of the door before a credential is presented to the reader. will this eco feature still account for this or will one of these ecolocks just not open when there is increased pressure on the door or lever.

I agree with others who said that this would appeal to the A/E community – and I also agree that the energy savings in most applications would likely be fairly small. Brian’s comment that “ASSA is fighting to get independent specifiers and the decision makers to write in their product on new jobs” is spot on. My general observation is that companies like ASSA and IR (now Allegion) seem to pour quite a bit of effort (and dollars) to get 'written in' on projects – particularly new construction projects.

Perhaps the big win here isn't cost savings directly but with the reduced current draw, you can now power this lock via POE based controllers, eliminating having to run seperate power.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports

Hikvision DS 2nd Gen Intercom Tested on Dec 12, 2019
With its newest IP intercom, Hikvision proclaims users can 'get full control over an entrance' regardless of where it is installed, home or office...
Disruptor Wyze Releases Undisruptive Smartlock on Dec 06, 2019
While Wyze has disrupted the consumer IP camera market with ~$20 cameras, its entrance into smart locks is entirely undisruptive. We have...
Access Startup Multi-Mount Aims To Streamline Reader Installs on Dec 03, 2019
Startup Multi-Mount claims it makes installing access readers 'Fast', 'Secure,' and fit 'any size frame.' The company states its bracket 'fits most...
China Uyghur Analytic Projects Require Intel And NVIDIA, Intel Condemns, NVIDIA Silent on Dec 02, 2019
At least 8 PRC China police projects require NVIDIA and Intel chips to power their Uyghur-detecting analytics, according to procurement documents...
Directory of Access Reader Manufacturers on Nov 27, 2019
Credential Readers are one of the most visible and noticeable parts of access systems, but installers often stick with only the brand they always...
Top 2020 Trend - AI Analytics on Nov 22, 2019
170+ Integrators answered: What do you think will be the top industry trend in 2020? Why? For the 4th year in a row, AI/video analytics was...
Glass Doors and Access Control Tutorial on Nov 21, 2019
One of the biggest access challenges are locking and securing glass doors. Unlike wood or steel doors that can be modified to work with...
ISC East 2019 Show Report on Nov 21, 2019
IPVM has finished in New York City covering both days of the ISC East 2019 show. Here is a 6+ minute general walkthrough: Inside this report,...
Avigilon H4 Intercom Tested on Nov 20, 2019
Avigilon is well-known for video surveillance and access, but how well does the company's intercom work? We purchased and tested Avigilon's H4...
Top Manufacturers Gaining and Losing 2019 on Nov 18, 2019
2019 has been an explosive year for video surveillance, with the world's two largest manufacturers, Dahua and Hikvision, being sanctioned for human...

Most Recent Industry Reports

Video Surveillance 101 Course Opened on Dec 12, 2019
IPVM is adding a Video Surveillance 101 course, designed to help those new to the industry to quickly understand the most important terms,...
Verkada Notification Outage on Dec 12, 2019
Verkada is suffering an event notification outage and analytic search failures. Inside, we examine what the issues are, what Verkada told IPVM...
Hikvision DS 2nd Gen Intercom Tested on Dec 12, 2019
With its newest IP intercom, Hikvision proclaims users can 'get full control over an entrance' regardless of where it is installed, home or office...
Honeywell 30 Series Cameras Tested Vs Dahua and Hikvision on Dec 11, 2019
Honeywell has infamously OEMed Dahua and Hikvision for years, but now they have introduced an NDAA-compliant line, the 30 Series, claiming "lower...
"Good Market, Bad Business Models" - Residential Security on Dec 11, 2019
Industry banker John Mack, at his company's annual event, took aim squarely at the problems in the residential security...
IP Camera Browser Support: Who's Broken / Who Works on Dec 10, 2019
For many years, IP cameras depended on ActiveX control, whose security flaws have been known for more than a decade. The good news is that this is...
Acquisitions - Winners and Losers on Dec 10, 2019
Most major manufacturers have been acquired over the last decade. But which have been good deals or not? In this report, we analyze the...
IP Camera Installability Shootout 2019 - Avigilon, Axis, Bosch, Dahua, Hanwha, Hikvision, Uniview, Vivotek on Dec 09, 2019
What are the best and worst cameras to install? Which manufacturers make it the hardest or easiest to install their cameras? We tested 35 total...
Viisights Raises $10 Million, Behavior Analytics Company Profile on Dec 09, 2019
Viisights, an Israeli AI analytics startup marketing "Behavioral Understanding Systems", announced $10 million Series A funding. We spoke to...
Disruptor Wyze Releases Undisruptive Smartlock on Dec 06, 2019
While Wyze has disrupted the consumer IP camera market with ~$20 cameras, its entrance into smart locks is entirely undisruptive. We have...