Daisy Chained Fiber Explained

Author: Brian Rhodes, Published on Jul 26, 2013

Fiber is a mainstay for networking cameras run far apart. The number of cameras seldom matches the fiber available, and having two strands to run multiple cameras can be a showstopper. In this case, 'daisy chaining', or running multiple cameras in series is a common solution, but it can be a major headache when equipment breaks. In this note we look at fiber 'daisy chaining', discussed why it is used, and what options for improving reliability are available.

Definition

** ***** '****-**-****' **********, '***** ********' *** * ****** ****** ** ********* ******** * ******* of ******* ** ******. ***** ********** ********* ********** *** **** *** **** ******, ***** **** ****** ***** * '****' in *** *****, *** *** ****** **** *** ****** ******* down ***** ***** ******** ** *** ***********. 

*** ***** ********* *** ***** ******** ********:

**** *****, * ***** ** *** ** *** ***** ***** results ** ******** ******* ***** ***. ****** ****** ******** ******** using '****' ** '***** *********' ********, ***** ***** ***** ********** ** ****** ** * single ****. ******* * ****** **** ** ***** *** ************* handle **** ***** *** ********* ** ****** *****, **** ***** is ******** ******, *** *** ********** ****** ** '*** ****** fiber' ********* ** ******* ******** *******.

The ***** ******** *********

***** * ****** ***** **** *** ** **** ** ****** the *** ********* ** **** *******, **** ****** ***** *** own ********** **** *** *******. ******* ******* **** ***** ** costly ** ************* **********, ************ ****** ********* *** ********** ****** to *** ******** ******* ** * ****** **** ** *****. Additionally, *** ****** ****** **** *** ************ ******** *** ***** can ******* **** **** **** ** *********, **** *** * small ************ ******.

Ideal ** *********

******* ***** ***** *** **** ******** ** ****** ** ***** in ***** ** ***********. ****** * ************ '****' ****** ********  several ******** ** *****, **** *** **** ** **** ******, is *** **** ********** ********. ** *** ******* *****, *** others *** **********.  *******, **** ******** ** ************* **** ****** and ******** **** **** ***** **** * ******* ***. 

*************, ***** ****** ****** ******** ***** ******** ** ******* **** * ****** ****. However, ***** **** ******* *********, ** ******** ******** ****** *** fine ****** *********** **** **** ****** ****** *** ***** ** typical ******* **********. ****** *** '**** & ****' ****** ** ethernet *******, ***** ******* **** ** ****** ******** ** ***** interference **** **** ***** ** * *****, ** *********** ***** quality ******** ******. 

*** ***** ***** *********** **** $**,*** ** *****, *********, *** terminations *** * ~** ****** ****** *** ***** * ***** 'Star' ***** ******* ********:

*** ** **** ********* (** ****** *********) *** ******* ****** of ***** ** *** *** ********** ****** *******. **********, ************ that ***** **** ******* ****** (**: *****, ***********, ******* ****, Municipal *******) **** **** * ****** **** ** ****** ** work ****.

*** ***** ***** (********) ******* *** ***** ********* *** **** common ********:

*************, "***** ********" ******** **** * ****** **** ** *****. Using * ****** ******* *********** *** ***** ** ** ******** ********** *** **** ******** ****** ********. ********, ** ***** ****** ********, *** ***** connection ** ****** *** ******* **** * '***** *********', **** allows ** ** ****** ********* ********** (******) ******* ** *** a ******* (*****) *******.

********* ************** *** ***** **********, *** *** '********' *******, *** *** other *** '**********' ************. **** '***** ********', **** ********** **** depends ** *** ***** ****** ** *** ********; ** *** example *****, ** ******* * ** ******, **** *** ****** is ********. *******, ** ******* * **** ****, **** *******, and *** ***** ******* ** *** ***** *** ********.

'**** ********' ****** ***** ******* *** ******* ****** ******* **** daisy ******* *****, ******* *** '****** *******' ** **** ******* by *** ***** ********* **** *** *** **** ** ***** connecting **** - ********* ****** ** **** *******.

Improving ***********

*** ********* ** ***** ******** *** ** ********* **** * few ****** *********. ** ** ********** ***** **** *** ** run ** *** '****' **** ** *** *****, '******** ****', ** '***** ******** ****' *** ***** ** *********** *******. The ***** ***** ***** **** **********:

*** ********** ***** **** ***** * '****' ** *******. ********** '**** ***.** (***)'******* ** *** ****** ******* ** * ****** ** '****************' failover, ****** * **** ****.  **** ** '******* *' ***** in *** ***** ******, *** ****** ****** ***** *** * good ******** ********** ** *** *** ******.

Comments (6)

we are using the same ring topology in our upcoming project for perimeter cameras

We use this apporach with many perimeter or multi-building systems. If possible and economically feasible, it's best practice to run the return fiber (segment 3 in the above diagram) back to the switch in a separate conduit. That way if a conduit gets cut (happens a lot when utilities contractors trench) there is no loss of functionality.

The minumum density of fiber that we pull is a 6-strand. The cost difference between a 2-strand fiber and a 6-strand is fairly minimal as part of the overall cost (trenching, conduit, labor). With a 6-strand, if you don't have a separate return conduit, you can still create the STP ring and have a pair of fiber left over.

We frequently face this kind of topology, and usually the question ends up being: Will the core switch with sfp module brand "X" work with media converter brand "Y"? To be on the safe side, we specify the same provider for both, or other times we just use the same media converters connected to a copper port of the core switch (instead of an SFP module).

I seriously doubt that the picture is what the text claims it is. Using a Reconfigurable Optical Add Drop Multipexor (ROADM) is silly on its face. And there are no multimode ROADMs. The fiber in the picture is all orange and therefore not single mode. And -- unless you needed to send video TO the cameras, you would just use colored optic SFPs and sort it out with a CWDM mux at the hub site. But this is still not a good idea.

Standard data wiring is radial from concentration points -- usually in data closets. I assume that the problem is outdoor cameras that exceed the 100 M copper cable distance. Otherwise that would be the more cost-effective and maintainable solution. If you need to use fiber to get to the distant cameras, you should run it radially back to a serving switch. You can use the same conduit layout as you would for daisy-chained -- just run multiple fiber circuits in the cable. One conclusion in the article that I agree with is that glass is cheap. The money is in the conduit.

What are the brands of the media converters?

If you going back with the fiber to the switch (better with one additional switch, where both are interconnected) after the last cam/media converter, then you building a classic "campus topology", and it will be less issue if something brakes in the chain or maintaining one of the switches.

Sometimes this is more wisely to build than building "star topology", even if my preferred topology is star.

Login to read this IPVM report.
Why do I need to log in?
IPVM conducts unique testing and research funded by member's payments enabling us to offer the most independent, accurate and in-depth information.

Related Reports on Networking

IP Camera Cable Labeling Guide on Sep 14, 2018
Labeling cables can save a lot of money and headaches. While it is easy to overlook, taking time to label runs during installation significantly...
Access Control Course Fall 2018 on Sep 06, 2018
Registration IS CLOSED ends this Thursday. Register now. If you are looking to strengthen your ability to design and deploy access systems or...
Ligowave Wireless Profile - Ubiquiti Competitor on Aug 27, 2018
Ubiquiti has become the most common choice for wireless in video surveillance (see Favorite Wireless Manufacturers) but not without controversy and...
Security Sales Course January 2019 on Jul 31, 2018
The next IPVM Security Sales Course will be held in January 2019. Register now and save $50. This sales course is customized for the needs and...
Directory of Video Surveillance Startups on Jul 18, 2018
This directory provides a list of video surveillance startups to help you see and research what companies are new or not yet broadly known entity...
July 2018 IP Networking Course on Jul 12, 2018
Registration is closed. This is the only networking course designed specifically for video surveillance professionals.  Lots of network training...
Axis Guardian - Cloud VMS And Alarm Monitoring - Released on Jun 19, 2018
Axis has struggled to deliver a cloud-based managed service video platform. Video service providers have utilized AVHS for over a decade, and have...
Powerline Networking For Video Surveillance Advocated By Comtrend on Jun 08, 2018
Powerline networking, using existing electrical wiring, has been around for many years. Indeed, over the years, some video surveillance providers...
Top Benefits Of Attending Trade Shows (Statistics) on May 15, 2018
150 integrators told IPVM: What are the top benefits of going to trade shows? The clear top 2 responses in order: (1) Networking (2) New...
IP Network Hardware for Surveillance Guide on May 02, 2018
Video surveillance systems depend on IP networking equipment. In this guide, we explain the key pieces of equipment and features, explaining where...

Most Recent Industry Reports

ADI's Financials Revealed + W-Box Growth Priority on Oct 15, 2018
  ADI is one of the most powerful distributors in the security industry but how big are they? How much profit do they make? How much do they sell...
Dahua Face Recognition Camera Tested on Oct 15, 2018
Dahua has been one of the industry's most vocal proponents of the value that AI creates: As part of this, Dahua has released a facial...
Amazon Touts Home Security Market Disruption on Oct 15, 2018
Amazon is coming for ADT and all of home security. Indeed, Amazon is advertising this as, in their own words, calling home security a: Inside...
Higher Power PoE 802.3bt Ratified, Impact on Security Products Examined on Oct 12, 2018
Power over Ethernet has become one of the most popular features of many video, access, and other security products. See our PoE for IP Video...
"New Zealand Govt Uses Chinese Cameras Banned In US", Considers Security Audit on Oct 12, 2018
Newsroom NZ has issued a report: "NZ Govt uses Chinese cameras banned in US": This comes after the US federal government banned purchases of...
Mysterious Patent Troll 'Secure Cam' Targets Industry, Sues Hanwha, Hikvison, JCI, Panasonic, More on Oct 11, 2018
A company named "Secure Cam," who is actively hiding their ownership, has acquired a slew of video patents and is systematically suing video...
Unfixed Critical Vulnerability In Millions of XiongMai Devices Disclosed on Oct 10, 2018
XiongMai, one of the biggest OEMs alongside Dahua and Hikvision, has suffered a critical vulnerability impacting millions of their devices. This...
Honeywell Hides Selling US Gov Banned Chinese Video Surveillance on Oct 10, 2018
Honeywell hides selling US government banned Chinese video surveillance as their own 'Honeywell' products, deceiving buyers and putting US security...
Door Hinges Guide on Oct 10, 2018
Some of the trickiest access control problems are caused by bad door hinges. From doors not closing right, to locks not locking, worn or warped...
Default Passwords Outlawed in California, US To Follow on Oct 09, 2018
UPDATES A new California bill aimed at improving security for connected devices has been signed into law. The law takes aim especially at...

The world's leading video surveillance information source, IPVM provides the best reporting, testing and training for 10,000+ members globally. Dedicated to independent and objective information, we uniquely refuse any and all advertisements, sponsorship and consulting from manufacturers.

About | FAQ | Contact