Tying Video And Access Control Together

I need some clarification on VLANs when surveillance and access control need to communicate, such as when a camera needs to call up to a door breach. What is the best practice for connecting the two networks together? Are they normally separate networks routed together? Or, are they normally on the same network?

On that same note, if we have two VLANs on the same network, can we still "route" them together so they can see only information that they need to see while the rest remains hidden? For example, instead of having surveillance and ACAM on the same network with full visibility, could we separate them on VLANs and then still allow them to see the pieces of the other VLAN that they may need, so the surveillance system is aware when the door is breached and the camera can be called up (but other aspects of the ACAM remain hidden such as access levels, users, etc)?

I hope my question is clear enough. I am a bit confused and that is translating into my question.

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