Special Considerations For A Fueling Facility

We are proposing a camera system for a fueling depot where trucks pickup home heating oil. Is there anything we should be aware of that is required for this type of environment? Because there is flammable liquids and possibly vapors present does that require us to use anything special on the installation above and beyond typical common practices?


Because there is flammable liquids and possibly vapors present does that require us to use anything special on the installation above and beyond typical common practices?

Short answer: Very Likely. If not officially, then it likely is the safe thing anyway.

We covered Intrinsically Safe (Non-sparking/ no potential for igniting vapors) surveillance gear in our Hazardous Area Surveillance note.

Following NEC Guidelines, there is a good chance your fuels transfer area is the most stringent classification - Class 1/Div1, or equivalent.

In many cases (most of them), it is a better solution to mount a standard camera/multiple cameras outside the hazardous area, and use lensing to bring the area close. This is due to the high comparative cost for a hazardous rated environment. A single box camera and all the specialty fittings/cables can be $10,000 or more.

I believe it is Class 1 Div 2. I can't see how anything could ignite not being anywhere near the pumps. The closest camera is at least 60+' away. I see cheap analog cameras splattered around every gas station in my area and never gave it a second thought. You would think a tractor trailer filled with fuel running next to the pump with all it's electronics runningwould be much more a hazzard than a self contained camera runnng on POE?

Thank you

Or all the people talking on cellphones while filling up.

Pucker factor = 10

Agreed. Flash point of Home Heating Oil: 126 °F Gasoline: −45 °F

You would think a tractor trailer filled with fuel running next to the pump with all it's electronics running would be much more a hazzard...

Well considering diesel engines don't produce a high-voltage spark, and diesel fuel isn't really that flammable...

I've been doing gas stations since I started in this biz 11+ years ago, having cameras mounted on the pump island canopies has never been a concern; even on new builds, the site specs have them there, so presumably this design has passed all the architects' and inspectors' eyes as well. For that matter, the lights used in the canopies have always been pretty standard sodium fixtures (LED more recently), nothing is sealed at that level, and I believe they run 220VAC.

I'm not an expert in the design specs, and it may differ somewhat by regional fire codes, but my understanding is that the main area of concern is within about 5' of the ground - intercoms, cameras, and any other electronics are mounted above that height (the dispensers themselves being the exception, but they're designed to be intrinsically safe). Conduit running inside the store stubs up above that height as well, with explosion-proof fittings on both ends, and is sealed with "Chico" before the site goes online.

Naturally, the rules will vary depending on the types of fuel involved. Best source for this information would be somewhere between the local fire marshall (who would be versed in the local codes), and the safety people for the oil company (who would know the requirements for the fuels involved).

I agree with diesel not being very flammable which questions why go through all the trouble for home heating oil? Very informative response. Thank you for your input.