Snooze Detection Of Operators

I recently heard that a number of call center/ monitoring stations are using PTZ cameras by manager to monitor if operators are snoozing on the job. Does anyone know what the state of the art is for this and how wide use, and how big a problem snoozing on the job is? Somewhat related to this is that some vehicle systems are testing a detection system to determine if the driver is snoozing.


Robert, do you mean automated, like the PTZ, by itself, is smart enough to know if a person is snoozing? Or do you mean the manager actively controls the PTZ looking for sleeping employees?

smart enough to know if a person is snoozing...

Snoozelytics incubator anyone?

PTZzzz.com is available!

Talk about a disruptive startup...

I recently read an article that indicated that gaze monitoring is on the verge of commercial viability. This sort of information should not only indicate wakefulness, but also some measure of attentiveness.

I presume that requires a fairly straight on shot which could be problematic in typical surveillance applications.

The article referred to both eye tracking headsets and glasses:

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129563.700-fitbit-for-the-mind-eyetracker-watches-your-reading.html#.UxO9sPldXyg

I have not seen these systems in operation, but I beleive that ptz presets are setup for each operator position, and the ptz is constantly touring the employees and displayed at the managers monitor. I have since heard that managers review dvr recording from the night shift. Perhaps lack of activity on the dvr would suggest snoozing. I don't know about any analytics for this.

Object left behind?

Robert, the PTZ preset / tour combination seems like a reasonable solution.

The issue of sleepy security guards/operators is a really old one. Guard Watchclocks were used to confirm security staff were attentive, which then became guardtours. (Detex still makes watchclocks!)

Guard tours usually involve logging when a guard reaches a certain point in a facility. Access control can be used for this; a guard waves his badge at a specific reader, and that event is logged at that door at a specific date/time. Big boss man can then pull a report of those events the next morning and confirm his guard was walking around, not snoozing under the airconditioner.

It would be easy enough to implement something similar for a surveillance operator. Just require the operator wave a badge every hour at a reader. Or set the screensaver on a workstation to lock out every 15 minutes if unused. Or any number of more devious/painful hoops to jump through that prevent an operator from taking a nap.

Semi-related: http://techcrunch.com/2014/02/27/netflix-fitbit-hack/

What kind of call center has operators sitting around potentially sleeping? Answer: An unsuccessful one.

'Call Center Operator' is one of the most over-metric'ed jobs on the planet. Everything they do is measured - and if they log out for any reason (so they won't get calls routed to their phone), they generally have to choose from a series of numbers which indicate different things (like 'bathroom', making follow-up calls, lunch break, or any other category that can be imagined by management). The reports that can be generated from these metrics would amaze and stupify any normal human (mid level managers are almost never normal humans; they stand upright with no discernable backbone).

Using PTZs (and especially PTZs with snooze analytics built in) sounds to me like trying to herd ants on horseback. There are far better (and easier) ways.

Using PTZs (and especially PTZs with snooze analytics built in) sounds to me like trying to herd ants on horseback. There are far better (and easier) ways.

Could 10,000 pre-vested, pro-bono, undated, series A options in PTZzzz.com make you reconsider your position?, We were hoping you would come on board as maybe Director of Electrons or Lead Negotiator in the NoDoz acquisition, or even (CQO) Chief Quip Officer...

"PTZzzz.com - Because if anyone snoozes, everyone loses..."

Your offer sounds intriguing - especially the open CQO position.

But first, I'm going to need to have a look at your patent portfolio....

:)