Residential ALPR: The RMR You Have Been Looking For?

Despite Brian Gugler's inventive scheme being roundly criticized as unseemly, might there be another way to monetize heavy vehicular traffic (30,000/40,000 per day)?

What about an ALPR camera recording and selling plates to the various national databases? Even if you only could get a tenth of a cent per plate it would be $10,000 a year!

How much does a reliable medium-range ALPR system cost, $2000-$5000? More?

Is it legal? I haven't found a reliable price per random plate, but when a plates matches a car to be repoed, $200 is not uncommon. Does anybody know what a plate would fetch?

Of course getting 30,000 plates a day at Gugler's place is not realistic due to the fact that you likely miss 1/2 the people getting off before they get to you, plus its multi-lane, plus close traffic makes it hard to see plates, plus weather...

But there's plenty of people who live near highways that would likely have way better capture rates.

Next time you're out and about, if you see a prime location, maybe strike an ADT style deal: free security system for the rights to put a crime-fighting ALPR system on their property...

This is already being done by a number of companies, see: Give Me Your License Plate Number, I Will Look You Up Online

This is already being done by a number of companies...

Those companies are 'demand creators', retailing license plate data. They are essential, not counter to the plan. They would be the customer in this model, the integrator would be the wholesaler.

Closer to someone doing it would be perhaps Mvtrac, though even then it appears that you upload your data in exchange for being alerted when someone on your hotlist is identified.

Unless maybe you know of someone installing ALPR at high-traffic residential sites and aggregating the data to sell to the retailers, I couldn't find any.

I believe they have their own subsidiaries or divisions that record video when they are doing repo work.

But I get your point. They are Nabisco and you can be the family wheat farmer selling to them.