Need Camera For Hospital MRI Room

There is an existing, what appears to be a very small camera in room already that is used for operator in next room to see patient. Our tech could not see any information on camera.

Customer wants an additional camera to view area.

I was going to use a mini-dome camera with a plastic housing.

Does anyone have camera recommendations?


There are two main issues that come to mind when considering placing a camera in a MRI Room.

  1. Eliminating the risk of the camera or its mounting hardware becoming a flying projectile due to the immense magnetic fields found during the operation of the scanner.
  2. Insuring the camera will adequately function during operation of the MRI, again due to the strong field.

Failure in #2 might entail a sizable monetary loss, but #1 could obviously be far worse.

Things like pocketknives and pens and even steel cylinders have been known to fly across the room, sometimes with deadly consequences. The safety officer of the hospital will be an important ally into sourcing

There are specialized, and no doubt very expensive, cameras designed for this purpose, like this one, which normally handles 3 tesla, though others can be specified up to 7 tesla. You need to inquire what strength the superconducting magnet coil generates to shop these. The safety officer of the hospital will be an important ally in sourcing the proper gear here.

If this were simply a theoretical discussion, I have various thoughts on what *might* work to meet #1 and #2, but I don't feel qualified to say much more than I have already have, so let us know how it goes!

I'm going to assume that the location of the camera currently in use is in the "other" room where the nursing tech is managing the MRI?

Maybe this link will help. http://www.ets-lindgren.com/4340

Thanks for the info.

It is to be located where the patient would be.

I am going to contact the MFG. of the system for their requirements.

We are actively installing cameras in the hospital MRI and Nuc-Med rooms. Not much to worry about as long as everything is plastic. We have not had any issues in making good pictures for the operating technician - both standard NTSC cameras and now Hi-Res cameras. We are generally looking across the room - into the "donut." Sometimes from both directions. If you are installing after the magnet is in the room, be sure to work with with the staff - no metal tools. They generally have a supply of non-ferrous tools they may let you use.

Did the hospitals let you use whatever cameras you like? What was the mounting hardware made of?

The first time we did this, we demonstrated the camera by holding it in the intended mounting location on a piece of cable through the door. We had the same concerns you did and wanted to be sure it would work and provide the desired view. I wasn't the tech that installed it, but all plastic was specified, including the fasteners. It was a ceiling / surface mount using nylon screws/nuts through the ceiling tile - as I recall.

Was there any problem with the cable?

Twisted pair, coax?

As I recall, the first one was traditional analog, but we were already using cat5 with baluns. We seldom use coax at all anymore, no matter what the system.