Is A 300 Pound Maglock Enough To Protect My Office?

My office has a wood inswing door that I want to use a 300lbs fail-safe Magnetic lock electromagnetic lock to keep locked. Is this good enough? It is a standard DC maglock with bond sensors.


Hello: Lots of interior doors are secured with similar maglocks.

300 pounds is a smaller unit than a typical 600 or 1200 pound model used to secure outside peremiter doors, but for a typical interior office opening this does not seem too weak.

Do you share the office? RTE can range from being mandatory for code compliance to just a good idea, but I'd also plan on using some here.

Protect it from what, respectfully?

A 300 Pound Man leaning on it?

To be fair, if a ripped up 300 pounder takes a run at most doors maglock or mechanical lock aside, they become matchsticks.

Yes, I edited my response...

Unlikely. 600lb would probably do it if he is average. The door frame may give way before the lock does.

Thanks Mark, I added a poll to the OP's question: "What Strength Maglock Is Needed For Wood Office Door?"

Please vote!

Install an electric strike and call it a day. Unless you have dual means of egress in the form of a motion + pneumatic button your are violating NFPA codes although that is up for discussion with your AHJ. Magnets on wood doors like that are for installers that don't know how to cut in strikes and/or correct door alignment issues, install hardware etc. There is no reason for it. We will only install mags in situations where you can't install a strike like double doors, herculite doors, etc..

There could be sheetrock with metal stud around this door so just bust through that like the Cool Aid guy and not bother with the lock if you want to get in.

Unless you have dual means of egress in the form of a motion + pneumatic button your are violating NFPA codes...

Or

That is true with the new code that you can just have a bar (mechanically) break the magnet however with a wood door in an office installing a bar is not a good look and it is also more work than just installing a strike. I just don't see the sense in using a maglock unless absolutely necessary.

That is true with the new code that you can just have a bar (mechanically) break the magnet however with a wood door in an office installing a bar is not a good look and it is also more work than just installing a strike. I just don't see the sense in using a maglock unless absolutely necessary...

Panic bars are seldom considered 'good looking' with wood or not. :)

It's important to note that while IBC 2015 indeed accepts RTE in a panic bar, most jurisdictions have not yet adopted the 2015 version. In fact, there are several major jurisdictions still using 2009 and 2006 versions.

Has the NFPA adopted it? Or are they always in-sync with the IBC?

I'm guessing that you have a better chance arguing a yet to be adopted standard with the AHJ, than with a obsoleted one?