Is It Common To Move/Drive Bucket Truck With Technician In The Bucket?

Spotted this a little while ago while out at lunch. Comcast contractor doing some work, drove about 400' with the tech in the bucket as seen in the pic. Didn't have a chance to get it on video, but they moved up the street from one pole to another.

I know that some lifts are specially modified to allow this, but this didn't look like anything non-standard.

Is this common, or was this likely an infraction?


OSHA Regulation 1910.67(c)(2)(viii)

An aerial lift truck may not be moved when the boom is elevated in a working position with men in the basket, except for equipment which is specifically designed for this type of operation in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section.

Apparently it's okay for women to be in the basket while moving.

Apparently it's okay for women to be in the basket while moving.

gold... that is funny...

Lol.

I just reported OSHA to the EEOC. Damn did that feel good.

Hmm... My mother in law has been looking for some part time work, I'll let her know.

very bad idea... anyone who has operated a boom lift (such as genie z or s series) knows that when you hit a minor dip in your path your basket will nearly catapult you... the time you save in not lowering down and doing it properly is not worth it...

Isn't that why you wear a harness and strap in? Sure, it could go badly, but that's why they make fall restraints.

That said, you wouldn't catch me riding in that moving bucket!

I believe OSHA requires a fall arrest harness when in a boom lift vs. a scissor lift.

Yes arrest vs restraint. I tend to mix them up.

Yes on the boom and no on the scissor lift. To my knowledge it's optional but scissor lifts are considered portable scaffolding with a railing. In a boom lift a harness is required and the tether type has many conflicting opinions. I use a fall restraint to keep me from going out of the bucket on an unforeseen bump. A fall arrest would typically make you fly further once it unraveled after impact.

One summer I spent a lot of time driving an offroad lift around what was going to be a parking garage relocating a bunch of voice, data, and security wires which ran through the area. Even with the bucket down, going down a slight incline could get a little scary.

On level ground, though, I've moved even very large (55') buckets while up in the air. Most aerial booms are regulated to a crawl when the boom is up, but I don't think that there's anything stopping a truck like the one in the topic here from moving.

I was told this guy is tied to the HVAC unit. They should have rented a bucket.Professional Security Systems Installer

But the bucket truck wasn't in the budget :)

I would think it's very likely an infraction, and if it's not, it should be.

If that truck hits a big pothole or dip, that guy in the bucket might go for a ride.

They usually put outriggers out to make the truck stable.

Even in a scissor lift on concrete floors at creeper speed, I drop the lift quite a bit before moving.

@Jon D

Probably not a good idea.

Go to the 40 second mark in this video for an example. Link

Two reasons why that happened:

1) Missing his harness and tether

2) After the first axel lands, you are supposed to rotate the turret 180 degrees to replicate the effect of the first axel landing, which is downward force.

You can't fix stupid.

After the first axel lands, you are supposed to rotate the turret 180 degrees to replicate the effect of the first axel landing, which is downward force.

It's not bucket science.

They'd do that with the bucket truck they had at Burningman for wireless set-up.

Yes, common and sometimes necessary. Cable placing bucket trucks are made for this, they have stronger components than normal service type bucket trucks and an intercom between the basket and the cab. Many cable placers have a reel carrier on the back of the truck as well to pay out the cable as its being installed in wide open areas.

In aerial construction, the first thing that goes up is the strand cable, typically 1/4" steel. Once it has been tensioned, the fiber/coax/copper is lashed to the strand. In congested areas with lots of other cables or other obstructions, the strand, cable and lasher have to be threaded over, under and around them. A moving platform makes this job much easier.

or just use a helicopter like this... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sh_Gch9Xwto