How Come It's Called A Mullion Mount, Even When Not Mounted On A Mullion?

Mull it over.


Mullion is a general term. It is used globally, while 'door frame' (another ambiguous term) can be misunderstood to be structurally internal to the door leaf itself. But to most, the door frame is/are the 'mullions' that surround a door leaf.

In North America, we generally call a 'mullion' the component that is anchored between the leaves on a double door to the frame. Incidentally, if this piece is anchored to the inactive door leaf rather than the frame, it is called an 'astragal' and serves to order the doors and weatherstrip between them. The drawing above notes this.

Making doors and windows is a really old trade, so there are ancient terms like 'transoms', 'sash', 'stiles', 'lites' come to mean specific parts of one door type, but general parts in others.

Thanks!

But to most, the door frame is/are the 'mullions' that surround a door leaf.

Which is the same as the jambs then?

I feel like jambs have to be made out of wood, but I'm sure that's wrong.

Jambs are a general feature of frames/mullions whether they are steel, wood, aluminum, plastic, regardless.

So are 'faces', 'rabbets', and 'soffits':

In keeping with the general "confusion" theme, I bet I'm not the only one who specifically equates "soffit" with with things like roof overhangs....

Sorry. No comment. Misread the title.