Do They Make a Low Depth Metal Door Strike?

Do they make a low depth metal door strike? My distributor said he didnt know of any.

Thanks


Terminology here is important. Do you need a mortise-mount strike, or surface/rim? Just how 'low' do you need? When you say 'low depth', what dimension do you mean?

Call out the critical dimension below on this example:

We cover the basics in our Selecting the Right Electric Strike guide to help navigate the many variables in play here.

Here is an image from the door. I know I can just cut the door, but the customer would rather I dont.

Thanks

So why not take an angle grinder and notch out a bigger pocket? Remove material in red area per the template:

Thats what I wanted to do, but the customer said I should look for alternatives first.

The strike you have will work. Three cuts later, the problem is solved.

Encourage the customer to know that the majority of electric strikes require cut-in. That's why he's buying your installation skill.

That frame was factory prepped for a standard latch strike box. Installing a new device and modifying what is there is just part of the project.

Thank you, I will take a look

The HES 8000 series is intended for frame prep like this and requires no cutting. But it'll work only with cylindrical doorsets, not mortise. I didn't see mention of what sort of lock it was here, so maybe it won't work for you. I don't think there's a mortise version.

Maybe the HES 8500?

Oh right they do have that one. I'm rusty on my strikes apparently.

I'm sure I don't know what I'm talking about but I was under the impression that mortise strikes can work with cylindrical locksets, but clearly, this is not always true.

What is different about the ones that can work with both kinds vs the ones that work with just one?

The location of the latches and deadbolts (and deadlatches too) much be accomodated for in strike selection.

If the strike pocket is small, it will have trouble keeping mortise lock latches. In other cases, there needs to be rigid spacers inserted into the strike keeper to depress the deadlatch when closed.

So the answer to your question: "What is different about the ones that can work with both kinds vs the ones that work with just one?" Size of the strike keeper pocket is a big one.

  • Smaller keepers = smaller solenoids = shallower strikes
  • Big/Wide keepers = bigger, multiple solenoids = bulkier strikes

I love HES products, but I've found that the door/frame has to be near perfect when using the 8000 series. If it's not, my experience has been that they catch when opening or don't latch well. In my area, the main door hardware supplier fights against them vigorously when they're specified for a project because of all the problems he's incurred.

That said, I have installed them successfully when I am absolutely not allowed to cut the strikes in (usually because of expensive wooden trim surrounding the hollow metal door). For these, I supply the lock and hire a locksmith/door hardware tech to install in case the door or frame is not aligned well (which is pretty common).

For these, I supply the lock and hire a locksmith/door hardware tech to install in case the door or frame is not aligned well (which is pretty common).

Readers may find our Door and Frame Alignment Primer useful if they cannot hire it out.

I use almost exclusively HES products, but like Rob states above the 8000 (and 8500) series are no good. Do not use them, you will have to replace it. I would talk the customer into useing the 5000 series pictured, you will not be dissapointed. Point out that if they ever want to stop using the strike they can simply make sure that it is set to fail secure and then the door will function like it would before cutting in a strike.

The best option to avoid cutting the frame is usually to use an electrified lockset. In addition to avoiding frame modification, this also eliminates binding issues caused by sagging doors, weatherstripping, etc. And it looks much more professional.

Dan,

I would agree with you on the electrified locksets and your points, they are typically much more expensive. Drilling the door for the wire is pretty straight forward unless it is a fire rated door then the AHJ might not want it done. When they are completed they do look very nice and eliminate the problems that you indicate.

Keefe summarized my thoughts, so I'll just add:

If hardwiring, drilling a door and putting in wired hinges sucks way worse than cutting the frame.

If using a battery powered/wireless lock, that problem is avoided, but then you have radios and battery replacement to worry about.

If hardwiring, drilling a door and putting in wired hinges sucks way worse than cutting the frame.

When I was a tech, I preferred drilling doors to cutting in strikes. Drilling a door, your work is in areas concealed when everything is put together. Cutting in a strike, any slip of the tool or imperfection in your cut may be visible next to the strike.

strikes have also come a long way in being more forgiving to those who make cust less than ideal or perfect... there was a time where any variance in your cut was on display for all to see, now just about every strike comes with a trim kit to make even the sloppiest of cuts look great...

If using a battery powered/wireless lock, that problem is avoided, but then you have radios and battery replacement to worry about.

l just got a Allegion AD series wireless lock. Chose this system because it integrates with the ACP we use. Seams like a solid system with email alerting for low battery so one would think that would take care of that headache. Anyone have any real life feedback on these?

This security consultant strongly prefers electrified locksets over electric strikes.

When electric strikes are used with cylindrical locks, it is common for the lock's deadlatch function to not work correctly, allowing the latch to be easily "slipped". I find this defect in about 6 out of 10 doors that I examine when doing security assessments. I wrote a short article about this topic on my website: Do Your Doors with Electric Strikes Latch Properly?

I also feel that adding an electric strike introduces an additional point of weakness into the overall door and lock system and don't recommend strikes for high security applications. The only time I specify strikes is on doors to lower security areas in the interior of the building, or when the door must unlatch for use with an automatic door opener.

I just want to say this is a fantastic discussion with numerous excellent comments. Remember to vote up comments to recognize your colleagues!

David, It doesn't fit all applications but for most cylindrical locksets try Securitrons UnLatch motorized strike series. No frame cuts required generaly.