BNC Out To HDMI In (Or D-Sub)

I have a DVR that only has BNC out for a monitor. My monitor only has HDMI or D-Sub in. How can I make this work?

Hi Jason, if the BNC is outputting NTSC or PAL composite analog, then just use some other old monitor which has composite analog input. On consumer monitors and TV's, this will be a yellow RCA socket. You'll just need a cheap BNC to RCA adapter cable. The alternative is to pay over $200 for analog to HDMI converter and you'll have to supply it with power.

If the BNC is an SDI or HD-SDI output, then you can buy a SDI to HDMI converter which will cost around $300 from companies including Blackmagic Design for whom I previously worked.

In theory, that would work, but in many cases such low-cost hardware is junk.

Like Luke said, the yellow RCA port is for video. Pick up a pack of RCA to BNC adapters like this, and you can make all the connections with typical surveillance terminations.

Except the LG monitor does not have RCA input ports. I ordered these monitors without checking the available inputs. It only has HDMI and D-Sub.

Firstly, good find! I didn't know of that converter. However as Brian mentioned, many low cost converters are junk meaning poor image quality or unreliable or both and I've noticed this is particularly true for analog to HDMI converters.

For the same cost as the (out of stock) converter you found, I wonder if you could pay the shipping costs to return your monitor and replace it with one that has the necessary composite input? I'm a big fan of eliminating external converters wherever possible as they just add more technicalities and more points of potential failure to your setup. They also require power which will cost you in the long run.

Alternatively, people in countries with digital TV have been throwing away analog TVs for some years. I suspect you could pick up a free analog monitor or TV rather easily to replace your dead monitor.

The old monitor (quit working) was a just a TV and the coax from the BNC connection on the DVR was converted with an RCA adapter connected to the TV and it worked fine. That's why I was hoping that I could use the converter.

Honestly, it will probably be cheaper/easier to buy a monitor with a composite input.

You can't get "there" from "here" without some active electronics in the middle. Due to the low volume and specialty nature of what you're looking for, you might end up spending almost as much as a display that would allow a direct connection would cost.

For under $200 you can get a 20"+ monitor with HDMI, VGA and Composite inputs.

Jason you also mention a d-sub, which may be VGA, (RGB + 2 sync). If so here's an active composite to VGA converter with good reviews that's cheap ($17) and in-stock:

I guess I've been over thinking this. New monitors seem to be the best option. Thanks!

I agree with the new monitors as well. Sometimes we get hung up on a product we already paid for, when in reality, it's a square peg in a round hole.

I had a similar circumstance with a client that had an older DVR without a VGA (D-Sub) output. He purchased a new LCD TV to replace his old CRT TV when it died, but couldn't figure out why all his cameras were no longer providing a color image. A service call was needed to fix the issue, as he had plugged the composite video cable (RCA) into one of the component video inputs. The composite input was hidden on the side of the TV behind a panel door.