Axis: Skip The Traditional Dealers. Buy All Your Cameras From CDW.

Is this a standard policy of Axis?

Where to buy surveillance cameras?

Or just a lone Axis rep with a thing for CDW?

Dave Curran


It appears to me he was just playing to the (Spiceworks) crowd by bringing up CDW.

He apparently thinks that IT people have no search engine skills, because you can buy Axis from a huge number of online resellers.

Regarding search engine skills, the poster right before him recommended "Google "Top 10 best security cameras" to get information on security cameras, so seems consistent in sophistication.

I punched in 'Top 10 cat videos lolz' and still found an Axis reseller.

Mister Toodles is only selling cameras until his YouTube channel takes off, then it's adios surveillance industry.

Brian, I agree, but from integrators and Axis partners viewpoint, how do you think they should take this? Should Axis just admit that it doesn't care to continue or maintain a traditional integrator relationship and go the way of mass consumerism?

I think the effective Axis response is: "Sure we let anyone resell our stuff anywhere anytime anyplace, but our 'partners' get greater discounts."

So, to Axis, clearly it is a 'relationship' but it's much more of 'friends with benefits' than 'married'.

So, to Axis, clearly it is a 'relationship' but it's much more of 'friends with benefits' than 'married'.

Best thing I've read on IPVM so far!

This looks like something attached to CDW or sponsored by them??? No Axis RSM touts CDW because they don't get paid for CDW sales even if its in their territory. ( there is an exception for large projects but it is very hard to get paid even then)

According to LinkedIn:

Dave Curran

Distribution Account Manager at Axis Communications, Greater Boston Area, Computer & Network Security
.....He is an Axis employee.

".....He is an Axis employee."

But not an RSM, you may likely be both right.

As a distribution account manager, perhaps he does get paid for CDW sales, whereas a regional sales manager would not.

Different pay plan so he sort of, may get paid for CDW...but definitely more neutral than an RSM...

How would that be "neutral"? Do we know or not if it would count more postive for him if he increased sales through CDW?

So is that Axis official postion? We have RSM's to build partnerships with dealers and integrators, but we're also going to be telling your end users to get their cameras from warehouses?

As a distribution manager its possible that the distribution account(s) he is responsible for sells to CDW... ( Axis treats their catalog resellers like an integration partner).

But Dave really would not care officially as an Axis employee who resells the product as long as they are an "authorized " reseller.

"We have RSM's to build partnerships with dealers and integrators, but we're also going to be telling your end users to get their cameras from warehouses?"

To this point...the answer is unfortuantely...yes this is how it works for them. The RSM doe not get credit for catalog sales just the integration partners so the RSM has to build that relationship with you and fight against the other outlets that he/she won't get paid for.

I notice it makes no mention of having to have a license to install security or cableing. A rather suspect post.

A license is not required everywhere.

A license to pull the wire is required everywhere.

Not for low voltage.

We all should put Dave Curran on the "must skip" list.

A license to pull the wire is not required in:

  • Arkansas
  • Colorado
  • Illinois only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Most of Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky only requires a license for fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Parts of Maryland
  • Mississipi
  • Most of Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey (although they've formed an advisory commitee to create a license program)
  • New York only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • No statewide license in Pennsylvania, different municipalities have different license requirements
  • South Carolina only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Texas only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Utah only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Vermont only requires a license for fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed
  • Wisconsin

So, it's not "everywhere", it's more like 66%.

Source here.

Actually I am talking about the electrical portion of the system. The NEC does require it and the only state I know of that does not reqire a license is Utah. When and where local municipalities require it is because the NEC says so right up in the front of the book.

http://goo.gl/fwJWMo

Electrical portion? What electrical portion? You don't need a license to plug a PoE switch into an outlet.

Ari, Illinois does require a license for fire, burg, cctv and access control. Beyond that, no license is required for general low voltage, including the cable to support the above systems.

That's why I said "Illinois only requires a license for security or fire alarm systems, other low voltage systems are unlicensed".

I understand. I was only attempting to clarify that the State views CCTV and access control as security. Some IT providers have attempted to hold IP surveillance equipment as IT devices. The State has not agreed.

First off, lets be clear, this is not an end-user that Dave is speaking to. This was the post he was replying to:

Hello, Several businesses want me to set up security cameras for them. One in particular wants them to be hidden throughout the store. I was thinking IP comeras would be the best because they want to be able to check the cameras whenever they want. (for example: at home on a pc, on a tablet, phone, etc). What are some good websites to purchase from? Also, can anyone recommend any books or sources where I can read and learn more about surveillance cameras?

So whats the exact beef here?

It doesn't say specifically the person he is replying to is not a low voltage installer, but it doesn't say they are, either. This is not the only instance, just an example. Plus this is an open forum of both end users and service providers.

It doesn't say specifically the person he is replying to is not a low voltage installer, but it doesn't say they are, either.

Right, but it is also clear that they are not the end-user.

This is not the only instance, just an example.

Yes, there is also one where an investigative integrator asks Dave point-blank (twice), who would he recommend end-users buy from, and Dave replies:

If they went with Axis cameras we would make sure to recommend that they purchase our products from either CDW or from an experienced integrator like yourself!

Even though he pays lip service to the integrator, this is a better example, right?

Here's a good example from Alaine of Axis (forerunner of Dave Curran)

Where can I buy an Axis/Buffalo small system?

5. Q) Who can I get into contact with for a quote on a full system?

a. CDW can offer you a full system quote: 800-800-4239

When Axis first started selling their cameras in 1996, if memory serves me correct, they promoted sales through already well established distribution channels. They were well known abroad for their protocal converters and printers. The network video camera was marketed for "live" monitoring but was nearly a novelty because few buyers had the bandwidth to support the products and storage was for all practical purposes non-existent. End users saw the potential of IP surveillance; advances in processor speeds, data storage and internet infrastructure opened Axis up to an untapped market. Over time, consumer demand has brought competitors into the market place as demand will do.

In part because of the market place at the time, the growth of the internet and the nature of the products they were originally bringing to the market, Axis(much like Canon, Epson, HP, Dell and others) has always employed distribution marketing methods. If anything, they are more like Dell than the others. They never had any interest in building a exclusive supportive dealer network that established security integrators were accustomed to and they are not alone. To be fair, they never hid that fact. To be even more fair, they are not really crying out loud about it now either. Their market share has decreased, profit margins are slimmer, they have been sold to Canon and Asia has changed this industry forever.

Even though it may sound like it, I am not defending them. Their first loyalty has always been to their sharholders. They met that responsibility by satisfying the end users using any means necessary. But given what we all see every day in this sector, the never ending influx of cheaper and cheaper equipment, can anyone honestly point out their mistake?

As an Axis representative, Iā€™d like to help clarify this discussion. As many have deduced, Dave Curran has taken on the responsibility of engaging with the Spiceworks community on behalf of Axis, in addition to his role as a distribution account manager. Our participation in this community is intended to be educational rather than sales-focused. Axis has and always will be committed to its network of more than 75,000 partners worldwide. We encourage companies to contact us for more information about finding the right partner, whether a reseller, integrator, installer or distributor, or visit http://www.axis.com/us/en/where-to-buy.

Kelly, since you're following the thread, would you mind clarifying what the role of a Distribution Account Manager is in your organization?

Specifically, are they the interface between Axis and various distributors for all channels, or just for the non-partner ones?

Also, several people at Axis have the title National Distribution Manager, is this a similar position?

Thanks!

For North America, the National Distribution Manager manages the team of Distribution Account Managers. The team handles the day-to-day commercial and operational relationships with our distribution partners at the corporate level.

"Axis has and always will be committed to its network of more than 75,000 partners worldwide."

Kelly I know you mean well, but it is really hard to understand how any company could be 'committed' to a group of 75,000 other companies? Perhaps I have too strong of a concept of what 'committed' means.

Perhaps I have too strong of a concept of what 'committed' means.

As implied by your humorous jibe at the top, the 'relationship' is not strictly monogamous, nor indiscriminate, but rather non-platonically fraternal. ;)

"Our participation in this community is intended to be educational rather than sales-focused."

Kelley, can you clarify what that means then for the question at hand?