Abu Dhabi Is A Very Safe City


There was a time when switching out your blue Ferrari for an identical red model could be counted on to buy a little time, but not anymore!

Not when they've got facial recognition technology that sees through heavily-tinted Ferrari windows!

Who knew that Abu Dhabi outsourced its police department to a group of U.S. Army Rangers?

Well done!

I noticed the 'americanized' LE chatter as well - but - as the Hollywood-style production values indicate, I think they are outsourcing their police department to the LA County Sheriff's Dept. rather than U.S. Army Rangers.

Notice the jargon at the 1:00 mark - "possible 422"

There is no radio code in the U.S. military that corresonds to this number.

There are, however, many U.S. cities LE who use '422' as a code for different things - like LASD's Terrorist Threat (Riverside County, CA shares this same code).

I think they are outsourcing their police department to the LA County Sherrif's Dept...

I feel this is unlikely for two reasons.

  1. Jurisdictional - in addition to host consent, to operate as a sovereign agency abroad, the LASD would likely have to be granted extraterritorial powers, by act of Congress or by order of the President, unlike the Armed Forces.
  2. As you say the LASD code for Terrorist Threat is 422, but this seems like quite a leap to make from a blacklisted car to terrorist threat. Since when do terrorists threats speed around at > 100 MPH, for no reason, in flashy sports cars, licensed 01234?

In any event, the two options are not exclusive, many special forces soldiers move on to positions in SWAT units. Furthermore the Rangers may have acquired any similar grammatical constructs from their training, per Wikipedia:

The Special Enforcement Bureau (SEB) is the LASD's equivalent of a SWAT team, which was originally a creation of the nearby Los Angeles Police Department during the 1960s. LASD SEB and LAPD SWAT have helped the United States Department of Defense in the past by training United States Army Rangers, United States Army Special Forces, and other military units on policing skills prior to being deployed overseas

"I think they are outsourcing their police department to the LA County Sherrif's Dept...

I feel this is unlikely for two reasons."

What?

1. You are arguing international jurisdiction policies? That' silly. Contrary to my referenced comment, I do not think that Abu Dhabi actually outsources their LE to the LASD - or to any foreign entity for that matter... I was being sarcastic. This video was a Hollywood-style PR piece - complete with Hollywood-style dramatic music score and scene cuts. Realism was not the goal, imo.

2. My comment about 'possible 422' was in response to your (I thought, in jest) throw off comment about U.S. Army Rangers running the operation in the video. The scenario in question - tracking a vehicle outside of, into and through a metropolitan area - sounds more like a police operation to me than something Army Rangers would be doing. Except maybe in Hollywood.

Finally, right before they mention the 'possible 422' the dispatcher says the "driver is wanted on multiple charges'. One does not have to actually be a 'terrorist' (in the convention you insinuate in rebuttal) to utter a terrorist threat. The LASD itself defines Terrorist Threats as:

"Terrorist threats is a very specific felony crime involving threats of death or great injury from a person capable of committing the threat."

You are arguing international jurisdiction policies? That' silly. Contrary to my referenced comment, I do not think that Abu Dhabi actually outsources their LE to the LASD - or to any foreign entity for that matter..

You are arguing military radio codes? That' silly. Contrary to my referenced comment, I do not think that Abu Dhabi actually outsources their LE to the U.S. Rangers - or to any foreign entity for that matter..

Two other things that bug me about this video:

1. At the 3:48 mark when the facial recognition algorithms show the suspect from the blue Ferrari sitting in the front seat of the red Ferrari - the LE in pursuit doesn't indicate to dispatch that the suspect is now in a red Ferrari (nor is this ever mentioned) - which is the first thing that you would expect would be reported.

2. The 'roadblock' at 5:18 fails to block the breakdown lanes on either side of the 5 police cars. Even a drunk redneck on COPS would've went right around them all - pick a side.

I am glad this is a CCTV forum and not a car forum.

Blue car is McLaren MP4-12c

Just incase you wanna see how the Ferrari and McLaren compare on the track.

hahaha - busted. I am completely un-knowledgeable regarding high-performance automobiles.

I drive a Kia Soul.

...the LE in pursuit doesn't indicate to dispatch that the suspect is now in a red Ferrari...

Also troubling, why is the order given to arrest the subject after the face rec? At the most disadvantageous time, with only one car needing to do a u-turn? Why give away the element of surprise now that you know it's who you thought it was before?

The 'roadblock' at 5:18 fails to block the breakdown lanes on either side of the 5 police cars. Even a drunk redneck on COPS would've went right around them all - pick a side.

Good call! And since when are terrorists afraid of roadblocks?

How did I get wrapped into this?!? LOL!!